For Better or Worse Advertising Campaign

northumbrian_k

Volunteer Host
Mar 2, 2017
4,291
0
Newcastle
There's a balance to be struck between telling it 'as it really is' and potentially painting a picture that is too rosy. My wife is past noticing now, but she would once have said that it must be awful to have dementia, apparently oblivious of her own Alzheimer's Disease. Compassion is important but so is knowing when it is not enough. It's maybe the title of the ad that bothers me most. My ultimate vow was to do what was needed for my wife irrespective of what she or I wanted. That did not mean slogging on, running myself into the ground and, ultimately, failing to give her the care she deserves. It did mean a tough but vital decision about how to get her that care when my efforts were no longer sufficient. Perhaps that hardest and best decision could feature in a follow-up.
 

Anthoula

Registered User
Apr 22, 2022
2,086
0
What audience is the advertisement targeting? Those who have no experience of dementia? If so then it fails as it minimises the impact of the associated problems . If it is aimed at the carers then it fails, as carers already understand how it affects them. If it is targeted towards those suffering with dementia it fails in so many ways. So what exactly was the point of it? I can`t see any point at all.
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
4,220
0
Victoria, Australia
There's a balance to be struck between telling it 'as it really is' and potentially painting a picture that is too rosy. My wife is past noticing now, but she would once have said that it must be awful to have dementia, apparently oblivious of her own Alzheimer's Disease. Compassion is important but so is knowing when it is not enough. It's maybe the title of the ad that bothers me most. My ultimate vow was to do what was needed for my wife irrespective of what she or I wanted. That did not mean slogging on, running myself into the ground and, ultimately, failing to give her the care she deserves. It did mean a tough but vital decision about how to get her that care when my efforts were no longer sufficient. Perhaps that hardest and best decision could feature in a follow-up.
And that vow about in sickness and in health means exactly what you so eloquently said, that placing someone into care is not abandoning them, it doesn’t mean dumping them and not having any responsibility or connection into the future.

If the person had some sort of trauma from an accident, or needed long term cancer care, no one would dream of suggesting that you keep on keeping on until you have nothing left to give.

Yet that ad has the subtle suggestion that you’ve made your vows, now it’s up to you to keep them.
I know that it shows love but love that can demand more than some of us have left to give.

As my dad used to say, ’There’s no point in boiling an empty kettle.’
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
24,656
0
South coast
I wish that the last scene in that ad where the wife says "I do" had been taken in a care home
It would have been much more realistic and helpful
 

sdmhred

Registered User
Jan 26, 2022
1,915
0
Surrey
Yes, you could have had a scene of the couple at an activity table or having a cup of tea with a smiley carer helping them.
 

Anthoula

Registered User
Apr 22, 2022
2,086
0
I am still puzzled as to exactly whom the advertisement is targeted. Can anyone please tell me.
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
1,938
0
I agree with @Anthoula. Who is the campaign targeted at? I assume that it's to raise funds and it's not just an awareness campaign.

I think that the Society doesn't want to frighten people too much by showing the real nitty-gritty of dementia care but at least it's better than the usual images of a sweet, well dressed, old lady smiling up into the face of a nice younger woman.
 

Anthoula

Registered User
Apr 22, 2022
2,086
0
I agree with @Anthoula. Who is the campaign targeted at? I assume that it's to raise funds and it's not just an awareness campaign.

I think that the Society doesn't want to frighten people too much by showing the real nitty-gritty of dementia care but at least it's better than the usual images of a sweet, well dressed, old lady smiling up into the face of a nice younger woman.
I feel sad to say this but I feel the AS failed miserably in whatever message their advertisement is trying to convey. Is it to make folk aware of dementia? If it is then it should be more honestly detailed for as it is it just shows an elderly person who is forgetful. If the ad is to promote fund raising then why not say so - please give generously etc. etc. If the AS were trying not to frighten people and make them fully aware that there is no cure and that suffering can be for many years then I suppose they succeeded, but what a waste of production time, effort and money.
 

Cardinal

Registered User
Oct 4, 2023
134
0
I don’t live in the UK but I watched the ad. I may be cynical but I at first assumed that the ad was paid for by social services. As we all know the cost of care in a care home is astronomical and most people will at some point need government help in paying for their loved ones care, once placed in a care home. The longer a PWD is cared for at home the less time they will need care in a care home and the less money it will cost social services. To me the ad said you married the PWD it’s your duty to take care of them.

I did feel the ad gently showed snippets of several different things caregivers encounter when caring for a PWD. I’m not sure what the purpose of the ad is. If it’s for donations for the Alzheimer’s association it did let people who are not dealing with this day to day see something besides a smiling person sitting at a table.
 

Chizz

Registered User
Jan 10, 2023
3,091
0
Kent
I am still puzzled as to exactly whom the advertisement is targeted. Can anyone please tell me.
The advertising campaign is, I believe, targeted at anyone who will give money to Alz Soc - so it has to be a little bit educational, a little bit to get sympathy, and little bit to get you (the viewer) to donate.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
22,627
0
Southampton
when the man says he wants to go home, that is so subtle that i missed it a few times. unless you are caring for PWD you may not know this is part of it. even if they made certain phrases louder, it might help. the one about not finding the teabags is another one a bit subtle like hes not normally in the kitchen so dont know where things are. even labelling seems pointless and really they dont check the labels most of ther time.
 

Anthoula

Registered User
Apr 22, 2022
2,086
0
My OH sees this advert and it visibly upsets him because it is an ongoing reminder to him of his diagnosis and problems. Not good.
 

Neveradullday!

Registered User
Oct 12, 2022
3,221
0
England
This is actually the first time I've seen this. We hardly watch ITV or C4, where I'm assuming it's shown - if it did come on, I'd turn it off sharpish.

I think it's very accurate, packs a fair bit into a short film. From the first confusion to having to provide personal care and dress the PWD.
The Alzheimer's Society probably did get more donations in September - so going for it again. It's clearly aimed at the general public who have little knowledge.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
5,626
0
Salford
Maybe the follow up could have a man caring for a woman with AZ like I did for both my mum then my wife. Just a thought.
K
 

Neveradullday!

Registered User
Oct 12, 2022
3,221
0
England
And don't understand 'I want to go home' ?
I was thinking of those who haven't any real clue - that the PWD can't dress themselves, for instance.
I was looking through the channels the other day - an old 'Birds of a Feather' was on. It had a brief scene of a dementia sufferer at a day centre. They were portrayed as a bit of a figure of fun - "Oh he thinks he's captaining a ship".
Some/many(?) haven't got a clue.
 

Neveradullday!

Registered User
Oct 12, 2022
3,221
0
England
Maybe the follow up could have a man caring for a woman with AZ like I did for both my mum then my wife. Just a thought.
K
They probably had one shot at it (with the funds available), Kevin.
To cover all the different scenarios they'd probably need about 10 short films.