1. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    It's 10ish here(pm)...sorry Debbie I always thought you were about 5 hours ahead so I thought perhaps you couldn't sleep!!! Geography is not a strong point(If geography has got anything to do with it):confused:
     
  2. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    ....and isn't it good how a depressing thread can end up so light-hearted!!!:) :) :)
     
  3. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    yeah ........ load of sad individuals aren't we :D

    as far as pronunciation goes .... first thing to know is that it's Irish, so the letters in it don't give many clues :cool: It's pronounced AWN-yuh ... She's BIG in Irish mythology ;)

    there's stories about her at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aine
     
  4. Amy

    Amy Registered User

    Jan 4, 2006
    3,453
    Hiya Mel, Just looked back to see who started the thread, in case we might have offended someone and found it's you. Phew, what a relief!
    Amy
     
  5. Amy

    Amy Registered User

    Jan 4, 2006
    3,453
    And there I was thinking you had French origins, shows how much I know!
    Amy
     
  6. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    moi? la france? non, je ne sais pas la francais :confused:
     
  7. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    It's a lovely name Áine....my husband is one quarter Irish ....we had a lovely holiday in the Sligo/Ballina area of Southern Ireland a couple of years ago and it was beautiful....very wet but beautiful....
    Amy....I'm sure no one could have got offended even if it wasn't me who started it.....it's so good for us sad souls to have a little bit of fun:)
     
  8. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I don't recall ever coming across this name before. How do you pronounce it? Not sure how you're going to tell me that in print as I can never grasp the phonetics in dictionaries but never mind!
     
  9. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Just read the thread back and my response didn't go where I thought it should :confused: Think I was in a time warp :D So all the questions I had asked and was going to ask seem to have been answered! I also had assumed it was French. I have an Irish colleague (with a nice easily pronounceable (sp?) name of Karen :D ) so will ask her to say the name for me on Monday :)

    I do find Irish names hard going. Siobhan is a good example as it doesn't sound anything like you think it would. Now what's wrong with a good old Irish name like Brenda :D
     
  10. rummy

    rummy Registered User

    Jul 15, 2005
    700
    Oklahoma,USA
    Aine, that is really beautiful ! I love the Irish names and named my daughter Erin.
    Giving a kid your name in the US would mean a lifetime of frustration of correcting people but I think I would consider it! ( If I weren't menopausal that is:eek: )
    Debbie
     
  11. jeannette

    jeannette Registered User

    Feb 27, 2006
    55
    You're all AMAZING!

    I can't get over how brave so many of you are. Makes me feel pretty humble (I've been trying to give up guilt - huh!) because I just can't seem to hack it any more. Fact is now I could NOT live with my mother any more. Visiting is getting harder and harder, taking her anywhere more impossible. But I am so very lucky (at the moment, touch wood) because the carer is still so patient, and I have support.

    But you guys... My compliments.

    Most of you speak of your "old mum", ie the way she was before AD. Is there anyone out there who had real issues with their mother before AD made everything a million times worse? Anyone else who sees things in their mother now, but can't say, hand on heart, that she was never like that before? Not the same, of course, but the "nasty" side coming out with no inhibitions to keep it down?

    That's a question and a subject I don't think I could ever raise if it weren't for the anonymity of TP. So much damned guilt. (See? I don't seem to have given it up after all.)

    I salute you all.

    Jeannette
     
  12. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I think one issue that my sister and myself had with our mum before dementia took hold is related to our so called brother. He has always been the favoured one but he shows no respect or love for her whatsoever and would bleed her dry if we weren't around, yet she can never seem to admit his faults and always makes excuses for him. He has seen her only twice in the last 18 months, once at my dad's funeral in November 2004 and then in December last year when she was in hospital and yet she will not hear a word said against him.

    A social worker recently did assessments on all the residents in my mum's nursing home and one description of my mum was 'a gentle self-effacing lady'. While that is true to a large extent and is how many people would think of her, there is much more to her than that and not all of it is good! The social worker did say in the same report that my mum 'had a good rapport with her daughters and her face lit up when she spoke directly to them'. I was extremely touched by that comment and wished some so called family members who have been quick to judge and criticise could read those words and see things in the same light!
     
  13. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london

    I read that on TP a lot how a love one seem to have favourer one particular sidling or that’s how they see it.

    Just make me wonder & if I am truthful with myself, I do that with one of my 4 children.

    One of my daughter complains to me how can I excuse his behaviour, she see it as his my favourite child,& they tell me that , his not it’s just that his my child even if his an adult & I just plain love him , you can’t just drop that love no matter how wrong the other sidling see him , I do not see that I am doing it, because I am not looking at it from the out side ,like my daughters do ,if you understand what I mean & I love them all the same , but its so hard to convince them of that .

    I must say that when I was younger I use to think my mother use to do this with my brother, only since my mother has AD & my children have grown up ,do I see it in a different light .

    My mother has change in a way since she had AD that I had wish that she would have been, when I was younger, she showing a nicer side of herself, I wonder am going to say it … is it because she feel she at my mercy? She felt that I never loved her as a child & I felt she never loved me as a child how wrong we both were & sometimes I feel she thinks I am looking after her another reason, but may –be that not her but the AD talking

    That’s why I tell my children since childhood that I love them
     

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