Walkers/Rollator/Frames

SMBeach

Registered User
Apr 19, 2020
291
0
Hello.
I’m looking for some advice regarding walking aids for dad. The dementia support services were taking dad out for walks which dad enjoyed as he rarely gets to exercise or leave home. Dad did say though that he felt his legs were heavy and he got tired quickly and found himself having to stop or walk slowly. So I thought I’d get him some sort of walking aid. I know the walking stick given to him by hospital or his gp (not sure who), he had found useful and to make a difference. I just want something that gives him a bit more support and a seat to sit down if he needs to rest. I’m looking for walking groups for dementia but so far with little luck. I think he’d be happy just feeling like he could go up and down the road a bit just to keep fit.

So I’m looking at all the different designs of frames, Rollator etc. I like the 3 wheeled ones that enable easy manouvering.

Before I take the plunge, have any of you had bad experience using them with dementia. I’ve read that walkers often cause more accidents as it takes some cognitive effort to use them.

Has anyone found them useful in the middle to later stages of dementia? I’ve asked the district nurse to assess dad for a walking frame for use in the garden at least.
 

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
7,229
0
Nottinghamshire
My mother in law had a three-wheeled rollator, that she used outside. She didn't get on with it that well, maybe because it was introduced quite late on. The walking frame, which she got much earlier on to use indoors, gave her a lot of confidence and she got quite fast with using that. The only trouble was when she tried to use it outside. She had several falls as it wasn't very safe on the uneven gravel paths around her house.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
25,048
0
South coast
OH has a 4 wheeled rollator with a seat so that he can sit down for a rest.
He was given this by the community OT who came and assessed him, so we didnt pay for it. She also knew what height to adjust it to and checked that he could use it safely. He got on so well with it that I bought another one that folded up smaller and could live in the boot of my car. I still have to go out with him, though, as he has lost his road sense and several times I have had to grab the rollator to stop him walking out in front of a car!!

I would ask your GP to refer him for an OT assessment. They might also, as part of the assessment, recommend things like grab rails, ramps and chair risers which might also help.
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
74,225
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72
Dundee
My mum had one of these but she was assessed by the OT department who then provided it - much as @canary suggested in the post above!
 

SMBeach

Registered User
Apr 19, 2020
291
0
Thanks everyone. I contacted OT but they say walking frames etc are all done under the District Nurse. They are however providing rails for front and back door. 🙂
 

sdmhred

Registered User
Jan 26, 2022
2,146
0
Surrey
We were recommended a 4 wheel rollator by a private OT. They advised the 4 wheeled ones are much more secure than 3 wheeled.

mum has adapted to it fine. She often needs me to put her hands in place but then walks well with it. We use for outside small distances. Wheelchair anything longer.

NHS following hospital stay provided a walking frame for indoors.

she feels much more confident with the equipment and I am convinced they have prevented falls.
 

SMBeach

Registered User
Apr 19, 2020
291
0
We were recommended a 4 wheel rollator by a private OT. They advised the 4 wheeled ones are much more secure than 3 wheeled.

mum has adapted to it fine. She often needs me to put her hands in place but then walks well with it. We use for outside small distances. Wheelchair anything longer.

NHS following hospital stay provided a walking frame for indoors.

she feels much more confident with the equipment and I am convinced they have prevented falls.
Oh that’s interesting. Thank you.
 

SMBeach

Registered User
Apr 19, 2020
291
0
I’m now being told it’s Physio, not district nurse. I dint think any of them actually know. Lol.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
25,048
0
South coast
I’m now being told it’s Physio, not district nurse. I dint think any of them actually know. Lol.
That sounds more likely. I didnt think the district nurses would know much about it and i doubt they would have time anyway!
There is a fair bit of overlap between what a physio does and what an OT does, so it probably depends on where you are. Can your GP refer you to the community physio?
 

SMBeach

Registered User
Apr 19, 2020
291
0
Yes. I’m going to arrange that. I do often wonder what help people with no family at all do get as nobody who comes into contact with my dad seems to notice or suggest anything that they think he may need. It’s just me coming up with suggestions and chasing everyone constantly.