1. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    Since Mum was formally diagnosed at the end of January I have kept a notebook with significant changes in her behaviour. In a weird way and despite reading about Alzheimer’s and a desire for sweet things this one just became poignant. I have never known Mum in 55+ years to put sugar in coffee or tea but in the cafe today she picked up a sugar packet and emptied into the mug, afterwards saying how nice the coffee was there.
     
  2. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    156
    It was only today l was chatting to a friend of mums and looking back there were lots of indicators that things were amiss as long ago as 2010, not least was mum at 73 suddenly starting to smoke...then about 5 years later forgot she had....maybe we should compile a list of all the small things that begin to form years before diagnosis but are definite red flags.
     
  3. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    I love being a 100 miles away. Left yesterday and the rotary drier was in the garden. This morning on our daily phone call she asked if I had moved it or knew who had as it is no longer there. So will be getting my detective hat on for Tuesday when I go to visit
     
  4. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,547
    @Bikerbeth Dad spent 3 weeks in hospital and started taking sugar in his coffee when he came home. He has not taken sugar for about 40 years.

    He has at least 6 caps hanging in his kitchen, all of them bearing the names of places that he has visited over the years on holidays but they are not his because he has never worn a cap in his life. I'm baffled.
     
  5. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    Definitely a case of NOT showing him a photo of him wearing one of the caps then
     
  6. northumbrian_k

    northumbrian_k Registered User

    Mar 2, 2017
    792
    Male
    Newcastle
    Looking back, an early indicator of my wife's dementia was when she started asking me whether I took milk and sugar in my coffee, as if we were casual acquaintances rather than partners for 40 years. It is often the small things that seem to mean the most.
     
  7. MrsV

    MrsV Registered User

    Apr 16, 2018
    97
    Hi OHSO,
    Looking back and long before diagnosis. Mum lost empathy for others, she became selfish, disinterested in anyone else. and now a few years after diagnosis all her filters have gone.
    She's never taken sugar in her tea, but has started to now, and a sweet tooth for cakes.
     
  8. RosettaT

    RosettaT Registered User

    Sep 9, 2018
    253
    Female
    Mid Lincs
    One of the first indicaters something was wrong with hubby, other than a bit of forgetfulness, was when he started making hot drinks with half hot and half cold water. I initially thought he had forgotten to boil the kettle but no, he was actively putting cold water in the mugs.
     
  9. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,531
    Female
    South coast
    Developing a sweet tooth is definitely a dementia symptom.
     
  10. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    156
    My mum has so many, that its only being on here that I have realised
    • Walking behind me, I slowed, she slowed, I stopped, she stopped ( possibly unaware where we were going)
    • Eating sweet stuff ( 6 cream eggs in 2 days - I had never seem mum eat chocolate at all at this time)
    • Started drinking coffee after never drinking tea or coffee for about 30 years.
    • Going to the bank and withdrawing large sums of money every week but still using card for all purchases
    • Getting obsessed with money, checking bank statements over and over
    • Stashing money around the house
    • Started smoking !!!
    • Hiding things, purse, hearing aid, glasses, bank statements then believing they had been stolen (often by me)
    • Forgetting appointments/Restaurant plans, then accuse me of not telling her
    • Declining or cancelling going out ( too tired/headache/just eaten etc etc)
    • Complaining about ailments, feeling dizzy/lightheaded ( I think to divert conversation if it got difficult)
    • Began obsessing about neighbours, exaggerating minor details into dramas
    • Saying things in exactly the same way, same words, when telling a story, or recounting a memory ( almost like a script) so much so I could almost tell it along side her.
    • Inappropriate comments, made loudly in quiet rooms ( doctors surgery 'they dont even look sick, why are they wasting time here' restaurant ' those children should learn how to behave, its the parents fault' ) very out of character.
    • changing history....and being adamant she wasnt wrong...this was a hard one to 'let go' for me, till I realised what the problem was and caused so many disagreements between us
    • Eating the same food over and over again, while still buying the same varied things she always did but then throwing it away or pushing it to the back of the cupboard.
     
  11. lis66

    lis66 Registered User

    Aug 7, 2015
    260
    My mum started taking sugar in her tea after not taking it for thirty years,she can also eat two or three buns one after another !!
     
  12. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,547
    Dad ate 15 GU chocolate ganaches in one day at 200 calories a pot.

    I had to hide them after that.
     
  13. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    Maybe I can get Mum to eat those as she has lost half a stone in a month
     
  14. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    Good visit with Mum today. Managed to track down the rotary washing line that had gone AWOL and she has now agreed to having hot meals delivered 5 days a week. We had a nice meal in her favourite cafe and no sugar in her coffee today!
     
  15. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,531
    Female
    South coast
    Well done!
     
  16. MrsV

    MrsV Registered User

    Apr 16, 2018
    97
    Yes, obsessing about the neighbours for sure, 'why aren't they home from work yet, its late'. Inappropriate comments loudly about peoples appearance, size. Hiding things, purse, handbag, keys, glasses.
     
  17. Bikerbeth

    Bikerbeth Registered User

    Feb 11, 2019
    259
    Bedford
    My Dad died 18 years ago and after that if I visited Mum she would use every excuse to get me to stay longer. Now when it gets to 4.30pm she is consistently saying I should leave and go home because ..... my partner will miss me, the traffic will be bad etc etc. I guess she is just tired nowadays
     
  18. Janelle

    Janelle New member

    Feb 2, 2019
    2
    My Mum also started to have a sweet tooth. After a lifetime of no sugar in tea she started taking artificial sweetener. Also, after a lifetime of having to be frugal with electricity, she would leave a room and leave the lights on so the whole house was lit up.
     
  19. Rach1985

    Rach1985 Registered User

    Jun 9, 2019
    398
    My dad stuck to a diet after having to take statins for high blood pressure. Looking back now his sweet tooth was definitely a sign. He ate 3 twirl bars in about 3 hours Sunday morning.
    The thing that made us smile though was when I had to buy normal muesli and not no added sugar (there wasn’t any) and he said ooh I’m not sure on that it’s a bit sweet. Made me smile, can eat 3 twirls happily but muesli with sugar was a bit much
     
  20. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    426
    Yes, Mummy developed a passion for carrot (or indeed any) cake, and would announce loudly "they are so FAT" at random people. I wonder how we never got arrested sometimes...
     

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