Sudden change in taste

JoeyToughts

Registered User
Oct 22, 2023
11
0
Hi,

I’ve had concerns for a while now but my mum is still very very present in a lot of what she thinks and does. At the moment my mum as far as I know doesn’t have dementia but it’s something I find myself worrying a lot about because of silly things she has been doing

Today she has porridge, she loves porridge, however for 2 days I’m a row now she suddenly has said that it tastes twangy and she doesn’t like it. My porridge tasted fine. Would it be likely dementia could cause a change in taste like this?
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
6,981
0
Salford
No idea what twangy means, too sweet, not sweet enough, or too stringy as it undercooked maybe, understanding is the only way forward, with AZ you can fight all the battles you want, but you will lose the war.
AZ doesn't take any prisoners the carers who post on here are just collateral damage.
Change in taste seem to be a common thing on here, but to be as specific as twangy, new one me. K
 

JoeyToughts

Registered User
Oct 22, 2023
11
0
No idea what twangy means, too sweet, not sweet enough, or too stringy as it undercooked maybe, understanding is the only way forward, with AZ you can fight all the battles you want, but you will lose the war.
AZ doesn't take any prisoners the carers who post on here are just collateral damage.
Change in taste seem to be a common thing on here, but to be as specific as twangy, new one me. K

A sour taste, like the taste is off, stale, rancid? I think
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
6,981
0
Salford
I'd try some sugar preferably brown sugar in the mix as you cook it, see if that helps.
Salt on porridge is a thing I understand, not for me but some people do add it too I understand. Not for me but it is a thing. K
 

Chizz

Registered User
Jan 10, 2023
4,036
0
Kent
Hi @JoeyToughts
My OH has Alz. In the early days she did have changes in food and drink tastes and she could express that - for example, she used to love warm Ribena but went off it altogether. As things progressed, she then began to lose the ability to find the right word or words to express what she meant - so she'd say that something - say a glass of water - was "too tight", or say a sauce -eg tartare sauce on fish was too sharp. In the shower she might say the water's too strong - meaning a bit hotter than she wants. Anyway, you get the idea - so twangy might be your mum's new description of the porridge. The change in their perception of the taste may have nothing to do with the actual taste - so, to you your porridge is fine.
Best wishes.
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
75,072
0
73
Dundee
Both my husband and my mum developed a very sweet tooth throught their dementia. There’s some information about changes in food preference here -

 

DeeCee7

Registered User
Oct 13, 2023
332
0
Hello @JoeyToughts I see you are still worried about your mum. Do you think the milk might have been a bit off and you hadn’t noticed yourself? Try a fresh bottle and see if it makes a difference. And has she mentioned any other foods tasting different? I was also thinking about your previous concerns over mum’s showering. How is that progressing? Is she still managing her shower about once a week ok?
I see it was the anniversary of your granddad’s passing not so long ago, I hope you managed that ok and could remember the happier times with him.
Thank you for sharing your concerns, and I hope it helps. We are always here to listen.
 

yoy

Registered User
Jun 19, 2022
299
0
I do think that their taste, or perception of taste, can change. I have been surprised to see my mum merrily eating foods in her care home which she would definitely not have eaten previously.