1. Lawson58

    Lawson58 Registered User

    My husband takes medication that strengthens the bladder and I know that there is a big difference in how many times he has to get up to go to the toilet during the night than before. He has been taking it for some years after problems following prostate surgery. Might help.
     
  2. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    @Lawson58 that is two nights using the nappy type pads and he has remained dry. Are they more comfortable, less easy to get into, whatever. I will continue to use these and the ordinary pads during the day as he rarely has accidents in the daytime. I am trying to get this sorted before he goes into respite. I have high standards for his hygiene and I want to be able to say honestly to them what his patterns are.

    Keeping on top of changes is wearing.
     
  3. Marnie63

    Marnie63 Registered User

    Dec 26, 2015
    1,547
    Hampshire
    In hindsight (and now 9 months on), I feel that the urine incontinence was the issue that caused us the most problems with mum. I now feel that maybe a catheter could have been a good idea, but I just felt I didn't want to do that to her, just to make things easier in that respect.

    Although we used the highest absorbency (and size!) pads I could find on the planet, it seemed, mum would still be wet some mornings, just due to the sheer volume of fluid that came out once the bladder was full. It seemed to channel up the fold on her left side, where thigh meets torso. Towards the end, the night carers and I used to wrap a small, square bed pad around the pad, but inside the stretch pants. So we'd put the big pad around her, then the stretchy/net pants, and slip one of the smaller bed pads inside the pants, trying to cover that part of her body. We still had leakages, but it certainly helped to contain things a little, and somethings saved us having to change the nightie. Changing mum's wet nightie, on my own, after an overnight leakage, while she was bed bound is a challenge you can never explain to someone who has not done it!

    It was trial and error with us and as a new issue arose, we plotted how to deal with it, and sometimes we won. I hope you find an answer as well @marionq.
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,629
    Female
    South coast
    As someone whose OH has to have a catheter, might I say that a catheter presents its own unique challenges.
    Apart from the logistics and mechanics of it there is a big problem in that many PWDs do not remember why it is there (or even what it is) and it comes as a constant nasty surprise to them, causing them to try and remove it on a regular basis. Unfortunately, they can injure themselves this way.

    My OH has an intermittent catheter, rather than an indwelling one, so it isnt there all the time causing problems, but it does mean that I have to get up at 2.00am (when he is confused and has no idea what is going on) to catheterise him.
     
  5. LizzieM

    LizzieM Registered User

    May 6, 2019
    12
    Good grief, my heart goes out for all of us having to deal with this - I find it one of the most depressing things; the constant background smell (whatever you do), piles of washing, apprehension as in dry or not, piles of pull-ups, catheters, UTIs, district nurse visits to factor in ( they’re lovely though) and now the continence service have changed the pull-up from Tena and they’re just not as good . I can confirm the prodigious amount of urine my OH (pwd) produces at night - incredible: filling large night bag, leg bag and then, oh yes, bypassing as there’s nowhere else for it to go. Thank heavens it’s not all the time.....
     
  6. Marnie63

    Marnie63 Registered User

    Dec 26, 2015
    1,547
    Hampshire
    That's one of the reasons I didn't want it. Mum tore one out in hospital once, they said it must have been very painful!
     
  7. Marnie63

    Marnie63 Registered User

    Dec 26, 2015
    1,547
    Hampshire
    In this day and age with technology to do stuff we could do without, it's a crying shame someone has not devised a method to make something like this easier to deal with.
     
  8. Lawson58

    Lawson58 Registered User

    Will keep my fingers crossed for you. We are not at that stage yet but I absolutely dread it.
     
  9. RosettaT

    RosettaT Registered User

    Sep 9, 2018
    152
    Female
    Mid Lincs
    #29 RosettaT, Jun 16, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
    My OH is cathetered because he retains urine otherwise. Some nights his night bag looks like an over inflated balloon. He does tend to pull/hold his tube and on 2 occassions has removed the leg bag over night so I have woken to dealing with a soaking wet bed. I was wondering if there is any form of fiddle proof cover I can get.
     
  10. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,629
    Female
    South coast
    I think the biggest problem is the way that people with dementia quite often produce very large amounts of urine during the night. If its during the day we could deal with it - keep changing them/catheterising them/emptying legs bags etc, but when it is at night you have no option apart from getting up during the night to sort it out, or dealing with wet beds in the morning.
     
  11. Marnie63

    Marnie63 Registered User

    Dec 26, 2015
    1,547
    Hampshire
    Yep, mum's bladder only seemed to release when she was tucked up in bed, usually just after the last carer had left! If only someone clever could use technology to devise something which could perhaps be surgically added, or maybe just physically attached on the abdomen, which forced the sphincter muscles to release. So then for those whose cognitive impairment has affected bladder control, the situation could be helped by the press of a button to empty their bladders at the most convenient time.

    Is there anyone out there listening?! It really was the thing that caused me the most in physical strain when caring for mum. I wish I was clever enough to invent something, I'd get working on it straight away. It has to come one day, I hope, for those coming down the line.
     
  12. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    For those struggling with the incontinence problem I thought I would offer an update. Plastic pants definitely out and nappy type pads in. These would be a solution of sorts except that John frequently removes his penis and pees over the side of the bed or as today on the bed. He had the mattress protector, sheet and Kylie sheet round his neck, the pad was bone dry but the mattress and floor at the side of his bed soaked.

    Have now gone down the road suggested by Izzy and ordered zip up the back pjs and also a new mattress from M&S in their sale costing £350. The last one 8 years ago was £700 so we are going down in the world.

    During the day at present I can keep things under control but nights are impossible so we'll see what happens now. I have good mattress protectors but they are no use if John strips them off so I now need one which he can not take off and is fully waterproof. Any suggestions?
     
  13. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,926
    Female
    Dundee
  14. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    Thanks Izzy that saved me searching. I have now ordered one. Onwards and upwards!
     
  15. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,926
    Female
    Dundee
    Excellent! Good luck!!
     
  16. AliceA

    AliceA Registered User

    May 27, 2016
    2,136
    I have a zipped up one and a more easily removable one that can be wiped or washed now and again.
    A waterproof cover on duvet, I use the Care Company sometimes. I do not remember where I bought these they do not rustle.

    While away a chair cushion was use to prevent problems for those sitting much of the time. I must get one. Our home is starting to resemble a care home. Now where do I get the uniform ............?
     
  17. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    @AliceA our home too is changing at a rapid rate as I try to tackle this problem. All of the bedding equipment, personal wear and things like carpet shampooer not to mention costs of WM and tumble drier all make this a costly outlay which must defeat those on a low income.

    Having experienced my mother’s home become horribly smelly from incontinence I just cannot go down that road with my own home. She resisted everything we tried to do to the extent that only when she was occasionally hospitalised could my sister and I rush in and get rid of and replace clothing and furnishings. At that time my husband John was a great help and support to me but now he is the problem. How sad.
     
  18. AliceA

    AliceA Registered User

    May 27, 2016
    2,136
    @marionq I have a keen sense of smell. So I know how you feel. Once I smelled gas outside, we called the company and a man with monitor came and gave the all clear. I insisted I could smell gas. He took the monitor further up the road and and to his astonishment he found a drain full of gas. I have missed my calling, perhaps I was a hound dog in a previous life:D

    I had an assessment for a respite care, almost 100% of my husband's income was to be given as a contribution the only thing set against it was council tax. As it was no respite was forthcoming at least not yet, I have been told I should get a direct payment. As it was I selfunded and treated like a holiday for both. I can not repeat this.
    What I fail to grasp is why the cost is not taken into consideration as you said the extra costs of care at home are very costly. My husband needs special food, extra heating, washing and irregular supplies of pull ups.
    Even volunteer drivers cost, we have a lot of hospital visits etc. Two mornings a week at a centre cost, I shop carefully on line but it nnot always the cheapest way as many have a delivery charge. It goes on and on as you know.
    It is sad to see our husbands become so week. Mind struggles at the moment to realise that hot weather means it is not safe to leave windows and doors open at night. He is right it would cool the house, but hardly safe.
    He was so security conscious at one time.
     
  19. Dosey

    Dosey Registered User

    Nov 27, 2017
    94
    #39 Dosey, Jul 11, 2019 at 12:42 PM
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 12:56 PM
    Hi Marion
    I purchased enclosed mattress covers on amazon several years ago. They can be removed for washing but also can be sponged with cleaning solutions. I have never washed mine in the machine as washing with sponge has been efficient. They are heavy duty and completely water proof. Only downside is they are green. I will check my amazon account and send you a supplier name. I also purchased these for my caravan beds 6 years ago when I purchased it new to preserve the mattresses.
    Rose x
    Hi just seen someone has given you link and you have ordered one. That's good that's the same place I got mine from. Hope this helps.
    Rose x
     
  20. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    Thanks @Dosey. I’m sure this is a common problem and a headache for carers.
     

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