paying for a care home when using it??

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi All

I sort of gatecrashed, maybe that is to strong, I just insisted I be present at the weekly meeting with Mum's consultant, ward Doctor, nurse etc.

Mum has taken another step downwards and I'll give you three guesses what caused it?

A UTI, so we are back to the beginning, trying to stabalise her, when the UTI has been dealt with.

The consultant gave wouldn't, couldn't? or just covering his A-- answers.

He doesn't see Mum being discharged before mid January, but still said it was early days and was maybe slightly hopeful of turning Mum around, so that she could go back to residential care. Mum at the moment has to have one to one nursing care for her safety.

I cannot imagine that medication can improve Mum's condition to such a vast extent that residential care will meet her care needs. After all we've been there.

What I then discovered I think, he was sitting on the fence.

He didn't want me to terminate the contract with Mum's care home, he was keeping his options open, if, when, they discharge her from the acute assessment unit in the hospital and she has nowhere to go (technically homeless)

I have found out that homeless, in NHS speak, doesn't mean technically, you don't have a home/house. It means that there is nowhere immediately available when they are ready to discharge, so therefore in an acute assessment ward, they can't discharge, so it would be bed blocking.

And again I think I perceived from the meeting that everything will be tried before continuing care is granted.
Fair enough, but I don't want MUM so sedated that yes, she could be anywhere and manageable, but prescibed a chemical cosh to save the NHS money

Sorry for this rant, but I don't know what to do for the best and Dad, in the care home has refused to get out of bed to-day, as has mostly been the norm since Saturday, so I am worried about hin also.

Sorry
Alfjess
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I've been thinking about this situation with your mother. Surely, in what appears to be the very unlikely event your mother could go back to the original home she would either a) go back into the room she shared with your father or b) go into a different room. If it was the first situation, well the room is still occupied by your father - all they'd have to do is move that bed back in. If it was the latter, you'd have to wait until a room was available anyway, wouldn't you? I mean, they're unlikely to have a spare room available just like that. If she needed a seperate room what effect would you having a contract with the home have? Would you skip any waiting list? Would you still have to wait your turn? Even if you could skip the waiting list, would that be meaningful? How frequently do rooms become available? To be honest, it sounds as if the home wants to thave their cake and eat it too.

As for the consultant - I guess there are good reasons for their desire never to commit themselves (I'm sure on ocasion people do attempt to hold them to whatever they say). On the other hand, I don't see that it should be your problem if they suddenly get their act into gear, want to discharge her, and then find she doesn't have a suitable placement. In fact, if there isn't a somewhat unsuitable placement ready and waiting for her, perhaps they'll be a bit more proactive in finding a suitable placement. It strikes me that it might be just a bit too easy, when push comes to shove, for them to take the less hassle (for them) route and push her back to this home, heavily sedated if necessary.

On balance, I think I cancel the contract for her. Just my opnion of course.

Love
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Jennifer

To-day after a lot of thought, I meant to terminate the contract, because given Mum's condition at the moment, I don't believe that they will manage to turn her around enough, to be able to go back to residential care and I don't think it would meet her needs long term anyway.

I went to view the new dementia unit (opening next week) at the complex where mum has been in residential care.

The manageress wasn't convinced she could meet Mum's complex behavioural care needs, as the Cpn had already spoken to her, but what she did tell me was that residents, already in the trust had priority, which has made me think twice about terminating the contract. I may need this facitlity in future.

I am still undecided.

As you say Jennifer, it would only mean moving a bed, which hasn't been removed as yet.

More confused undecided than ever

Thanks
Alfjess
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
You really are caught between a rock and a hard place with this, aren't you? It's almost like a strange sort of gambling, and you're having to work out the odds. If I pay x amount for n weeks and there is a y chance of my mother imporving enough to use this care home, I win, but if any of those change I lose. I have to say, from what you say, the odds aren't in your favour, but I can understand if you have an almost superstitious desire not to rock the boat.

No words or wisdom, but a lot of sympathy.

Love
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Jennifer

This was my thought exactly, do I gamble on the very slight chance of Mum being able to go back to the care home?

I think the odds would be very high? If that is correct?
Not being a gambling person myself, but I suppose my husband could probably work out the odds for me.
He has a racehorse. I prefer pets.

I feel that I am being fleeced, but I am afraid, not to go along with it. Just in case

It is disgraceful that we carers have this worry, as well as,the worry of our loved ones welfare.

In an ideal world everything would be in place, but we don't live in an ideal world, it is all down to finances
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Jennifer

This was my thought exactly, do I gamble on the very slight chance of Mum being able to go back to the care home?

I think the odds would be very high? If that is correct?
Not being a gambling person myself, but I suppose my husband could probably work out the odds for me.
He has a racehorse. I prefer pets.

I feel that I am being fleeced, but I am afraid, not to go along with it. Just in case

It is disgraceful that we carers have this worry, as well as,the worry of our loved one's welfare.

In an ideal world everything would be in place, but we don't live in an ideal world, it is all down to finances

Thanks for your interest
Alfjess
 

Margaret W

Registered User
Apr 28, 2007
3,725
North Derbyshire
Alfjess

My heart goes out to you, and I am not a soppy person, not many get me feeling protective, but your story has done that. I want to give you a hug, I can't do pictures, just a hug.

I hope it all works out for you. I can't advise, never been in your position, but I suppose all of us might be if our rellies are moved to hospital. I suppose all you can do is continue paying the room charge, as hospital is free, but of course you wouldn't still be getting Attendance Allowance, which makes a big difference.

Do the government realise this?

Moderators - shouldn't we have a forum on things for the government to recognise, and perhaps put forward a combined letter to our leaders?

Regards

Margaret
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Magaret

As I am in Scotland, when in a care home, an allowance for personal care of £145.00 per week is paid direct to the care home, so therefore we don't get AA.

Care home says PCA is only paid for 2 weeks after admission to hospital. SS say this allowance is paid for six weeks. I don't know which of them are correct, but I mean to find out.
The only thing I know, I have been charged full rate for Mum even though she is in hospital, so I have now terminated the contract and will just have to deal with the consequences as and when I need to.

Thanks
Alfjess
 

chip

Registered User
Jul 19, 2005
400
Scotland
Iwas interested in you saying about contracts. I have not seen never mind signed a contract for my husbands nursing home. I still don't no the cost that we've to pay ether. So again i don't no where i stand. Do all nursing homes give you a contract?
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
There supposed to Chip BUT I did see some stuff on the scotland websites that indicates that for some reason, many people who are in care homes in Scotland and placed there by social services or the NHS DON'T have contracts, or at least not ones that the families have seen. Also, my mother was in a NH (in England) from March until her death and I never did sign a contract (and it wasn't for lack of trying).
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Chip, I have a contract with the NH, and also one with the LA, who have one with the NH!

Sounds complicated, but in fact the LA pay the NH, then bill me for the amount less the personal care allowance. My NH contract is just about my rights, notice if I want to move him, what happens if they want to move him. If it wasn't arranged by SS. there woulfd also have been a financial section.

I was told when John was due to leave hospital that he couldn't be transferred until all the contracts were in place.

I think you should ring you SW in the morning to find out your position. You need to know how much you'll be paying. If it's possible, try to get your LA to arrange the contracts. It means I only pay what the LA is prepared to pay, and the NH can't just put up the fees whenever they like.
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Jennifer

It does indeed read as though the care home manager was right about 2 weeks.

Thanks for the link. I will phone SS again tomorrow to check.

It was the senior social worker I spoke with, you would think she would have the correct facts!

Thanks
Alfjess
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Come, come now Alfjess - I KNOW you've been doing this for several years. Why would you think something silly like that? :D
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Right Jennifer

How could I be so niave?

I phoned the senior SW to-day, as usual it was the answering machine, so I left a message, but I am still awaiting a return phone call.

Lets see what tomorrow brings!!

Alfjess