How does Mum know?

Kathleen

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
639
65
West Sussex
As some of you know, at the moment we are waiting to get the EPA registered and this causes a lot of stress to us all.

Mum, though is totally unaware of the problem as, apart from being in an EMI home and away from the problem, no-one has ever mentioned what is happening anywhere near her, nor do we ever talk of my brother to her.......the cause of the problem.

The strangest things have happened on the last two occasions my sister and I have visited.

With me, Mum was apparently asleep, then opened her eyes and said "if he doesn't shut up by friday, hit him over the head with a brick" then laughed. This is from a lady who can barely string three coherent words together any more.

My sister's visit was next and Mum asked
"have I made a will?"
when told she had, she said "I don't want him taking any of my things"

As it turns out, we since learned, there is an objection from my brother that the EPA was made out when Mum was unable to understand what she was signing...........wrong, but worth a try as his other objections have been proven to be unfounded.........this would mean the EPA was invalid, so too would be the will made the same day.

Strangest of all is that if that were the case, the previous will would be restored and in that will, my brother was left not one penny piece because of the awful way he was treating everyone.

He is getting a letter tomorrow to ask if he really wants to go ahead with this objection under these circumstances.............I'm guessing not!

We have racked our brains for a logical explanation to how Mum seems to know what is going on, but can't find the answers. It is strangely comforting though

Kathleen
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,319
66
Toronto, Canada
It is nice to think that your Mum is still connected somehow. Logical explanations can't explain everything. And yes, I would find it comforting too.

Glad to hear about the letter you're sending. I hope you really rattle his cage. You should agree with him & say you're going back to the old will - the one he gets nothing.

Do tell us how that turns out. I'll bet you'll hear his sphincter snapping shut!!
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Kathleen said:
The strangest things have happened on the last two occasions my sister and I have visited.

With me, Mum was apparently asleep, then opened her eyes and said "if he doesn't shut up by friday, hit him over the head with a brick" then laughed. This is from a lady who can barely string three coherent words together any more.

My sister's visit was next and Mum asked
"have I made a will?"
when told she had, she said "I don't want him taking any of my things"
That really is strange. Your mum obviously retains memories of your brother's behaviour, but why should they surface now? Do you believ in ESP? Or could the carers have been talking about it in her hearing?

Anyway, it sound as if you've got him all ends up over the EPA and will. Well done! let us know how you get on.

Love,
 

Kathleen

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
639
65
West Sussex
None of the carers know anything about this, we have deliberately said nothing in case they happened to mention about it in Mum's hearing.

Mum always knew when things were wrong with us. years ago, when I had a motorcycle accident, she stood up from the table where the rest of the family were eating and said "somethings happened to Kathleen" at the same time I was flying over the bonnet of the car.

Intuition, esp, whatever it was she had it, maybe still has on a level AD can't yet reach.

Who knows.

Kathleen
x
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
I've heard of that happening with identical twins, but not in mother/daughter. And for it to survive AD is amazing. Another field for research?

Love,
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,695
Kent
Hi Kathleen, is it possible your brother could have made contact with your mother in any way? If not, it really is a bit spooky. Who knows what perceptions people are left with when we think all means of communication have been lost.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
They are many neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, that is affected by AZ disease , science knows that a thought is an energy , so my be your mother still has thought left that is not effects so badly by the disease , so the energy that produces the thought may simulate one of the neurotransmitters to reconnect when relaxing , could be that she was dreaming of a past memory of you brother Still retaining some of the conversation she hear now , around her in her waking time life , that energy, thought simulated her memory to say what she said .
if he doesn't shut up by friday, hit him over the head with a brick" then laughed. This is from a lady who can barely string three coherent words together any more.
when she woke up from the dream

my perception only as in wondering reading up for years on the brain trying to work it out as it also happen to my mother, but in diffrent situations.

Also nightmare happen in part of the brain that works the imagination,
So that’s why Hallucination can happen at night when asleep or during the day , depending if the brain is affected with the disease in that area
 
Last edited:

Kathleen

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
639
65
West Sussex
Granny G

No, my brother last visited in November 2006, well before all this started.

I am at a loss to know what is going on with her, just glad that it will soon be resolved, the registration can take place and her home sold to one of her grandchildren, that would make her so happy.

My daughter was visiting her a few months ago when Mum said "the ding-dong needs mending"..............yes, when she got back to the house (Mum's), the batteries had failed in the front door-bell!

This same daughter occasionally smells rolling tobacco in the house and shed even though neither of them smoke, but Dad did up until a few years ago, she finds it a comfort.

Kathleen
x
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,695
Kent
Dear Kathleen, from what you write, there must be something over and above our power of understanding.
 

Lonestray

Registered User
Aug 3, 2006
236
Hereford
Strange

Kathleen,
Your post struck a cord with me. When our youngest grandaughter was about six, Jean, our daughter and I attended the school Christmas show. There were young girls all in white who had just finished singing, as they trouped off the stage one child caught my eye and just camly walked into audience over to me, reached for my hand and smiled then just went. People were looking, our daughter Colleen asked "What was that all about?" "Oh just between us"

To this day I can't explain, but something wonderful passed between us, a meeting of minds? Padraig
 

RussellC

Registered User
Jul 6, 2006
47
It is my belief, for what it is worth, that my father had more awareness than was apparent from his condition.

I might listen to 30 minutes worth of what seemed like incoherent chatter and then there would be a word that made sense of it all. When verbal skills had declined badly I learned to interpret facial expressions or moods.

Following on from this I believe that what was taken from Dad was the ability to communicate, not his essential humanity.

Russell
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
RussellC said:
Following on from this I believe that what was taken from Dad was the ability to communicate, not his essential humanity.
Russell, that is exactly what I believe about John. However frustrated we get in not being able to understand each other, he is still John.

There is more to communication than speech.
 

Helena

Registered User
May 24, 2006
715
If the house is to be sold to a Grandchild be vERY VERY sure that its been valued by the District Valuer

Otherwise you could land up with all kinds of allegations from your Brother plus even Court of Protection
 

Kathleen

Registered User
Mar 12, 2005
639
65
West Sussex
Helena

The house has had 5 valuations, 2 after the objection went in, plus one from the county valuer. Unfortunately Mum will probably have to pay for all this out of her funds. There was never any problem at all with the sale price.

We are just hoping the Court of Protection see his objections for what they are and make him pay all costs.

Besides, anyone who wanted to do Mum out of anything, or make a profit from her suffering would have to get past me first!

I may be quite a gentle person, but I fight like a lioness to protect my family, all except one, of course.

Kathleen
 

Brucie

Registered User
Jan 31, 2004
12,413
near London
Yes, as Helena says, and as Alzheimer's Society also says:

someone with dementia might be entitled to NHS continuing care. It depends upon the assessed care needs of the individual.
Anyone with dementia about to enter, or who is already in, full time residential care is entitled to an assessment to see if they qualify for NHS continuing care

The Alzheimer’s Society campaigns for

· Adequate NHS continuing care provision across the country

· National eligibility criteria for long term care across all sectors (health, social and residential)

· Criteria for NHS continuing care for people with dementia to place adequate emphasis on the need for psychological support for individuals.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Kathleen said:
Besides, anyone who wanted to do Mum out of anything, or make a profit from her suffering would have to get past me first!

I may be quite a gentle person, but I fight like a lioness to protect my family, all except one, of course.
Good for you Kathleen. Stay strong.

Love,
 

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