1. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    Hello everyone,

    When I lost my job as an engineer, I also started to loose my memory as far as my computer was going, and it took many months of trial and error to get some of it back.
    I can not remember how to do a lot of things I used to do at work on the computer, but I have got enough to get me through. I think it is a wonderful tool for those with Dementia to use as they can at times express them selves better that way than they can by talking to someone, don't ask how but it works.
    I suppose we don't feel threatened by facing someone directly?, and yet it is nice to see a photograph of someone at the other end.
    But I do think it would be a good idea, if branches could encourage people to try using a computer in a zone set up for it, away from pressures of other people who are watching etc.
    I can appreciate that there are costs involved as well as coaching, but surely there are enough helpers or people like myself who would gladly give up some time to help others like this. I know I get a lot of pleasure helping others when I am up to it so there must be others.
    It is amazing how many people can not or are frightened of useing computers, but as we here know it is an ideal way to contact others.

    Best wishes

    kenc
     
  2. Lila13

    Lila13 Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    1,342
    Sadly my mother gave up emailing when she got so ill last autumn and there was nothing we could do to persuade her to look at the screen again, even when friends and relations posted photos to her.

    She also persuaded herself that using the computer was harmful (possibly one of the causes of her illness) and therefore worried about the amount of time I spent on it.

    Lila
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    Oh Ken, I`ve tried so hard to encourage my husband to develop even the most basic computer skills, but he loses all the information after a few minutes and has now lost interest.

    You are an inspiration, but you did have computer skills before your memory began failing you, so in effect you were re learning old skills.

    My husband often sits with me when I`m on the computer, and he admires the benefits. He is just unable to benefit from them.

    Keep up your good work. Sylvia
     
  4. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    #4 KenC, Nov 19, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2006
    Compurters and Dementia

    Hello Grannie G,
    I can really appreciate what you are saying.
    Believe it or not I can not write a letter now by hand, because I keep going from capitals to small case, and back again without trying.
    For some reason the brain switches from one to another without me thinking about it, and what is worse than the thought that I can not stop it. To write an e-mail, I need to keep one hand out of the way otherwise all hell breaks loose if I try to use both hands. I have lost the nack of using a pen to write with, but I am struggling with the computer. At least I have got the spell check.
    When I was at work I realised things were going wrong, when I could not write an order form by hand anymore. I am lucky that I am in the early stages. But there are times that I forget how to sign my name, and that is hard after all these years.


    Keep trying he may well grasp it before long.

    Best wishes

    kenc
     
  5. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    The brain is an enigma Ken. When I write by hand, often my mind goes faster than my pen, so I leave out letters and sometimes, even words.
    The beauty of the computer is the edit facility. How often, before I had a PC, did I have to scrap practically a full page of script.
    From reading your Posts, no-one would suspect for one minute, the effort it takes. I hope My husband will eventually grasp it.
    Thanks, and keep writing. Sylvia
     
  6. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Ken, you are a star.

    Our local Alzheimer's branch have a computer that people are welcome to practise on, but I don't think anyone has through of offering 'tuition'.

    Maybe I shall be able to offer something along these lines in the future.......have more time to myself now.

    Love,
     
  7. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    #7 KenC, Nov 22, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2006
    Hi all
    I do realise that those with Dementia are at a disadvantage to others in some respects, and do not always come across as that. We all look normal outside but the brain thinks otherwise, and works differently, in fact I feel mine is working on its own at times.
    I for instance am fine on some days and nothing gets to me. But on others I can not work out how to say a word let alone try to spell it. Sometimes I end up breaking a word down totally to see how to spell or say it. ( I'm going back to basics, or my brain is). Its as if my brain and every thing else are seperate. The brain tries to do one thing and the body something else. Which is why in some cases if not all it would be better to have tuition on the computer. If I read something and then try to do it, it does not work because I find I have forgotten what I have just read.
    I can understand what is happening on the Forum, but in reality, it does not work for everyone else.
    Even though I used computers every day at work, home, for letters reports estimates and other things, I now find I am struggling with simple things. So I understand that people can not use them. But it is a medium that is becoming popular with this illness, because we find we can commumicate better than talking face to face at times. But perhaps its just a case of trial and error. Today is a good day for me, as far as this goes yesterday was different.

    Best Wishes

    kenc
     
  8. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    Hi Ken I hope you have many more `good days`. I`m always so inspired by your posts.

    Regards , Sylvia
     
  9. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    ken c

    please talk to me
    hubby has demetia and i think you could help
    love bel x
     
  10. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    #10 KenC, Dec 14, 2006
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2006
    Hi bel,
    I am not sure what I can say. We are all different and react differently. Although it is easy for me to say that I am determined to fight this all the way I know that sooner or later it will get the best of me.
    I am lucky that I got involved with a fantastic Branch office in my home town and they supported me and gently pushed me in the right direction.
    After that I have used the society as a tool to keep my mind occupied. I am also lucky to have a very supportive wife,(God Bless her) because she won't let me give in and now she helps me to do work for the society.
    When I can I have also tried to talk about my problems to others. Sometimes it helps others it doesnt. I know it is very hard at times to explain things and sometimes I find it hard to talk about things, but I have to try for my wifes sake if not my own.
    The society needs people like your husband and I to talk about our problems in the hope that it will help others if not ourselves. Try to get him to use a computer if you can, because the society has one or two wonderful web sites, where we can express ourselves. I hope I have helped you in some way.
    ps. There is supposed to be a very good branch office near to where you live, try to get him to go and see them.

    Best wishes
    kenc
     
  11. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    you have helped

    dear ken
    thanks a lot you have helped it has given me some ideas
    on line talking would be no good for hubby even with me spelling for him it would frustrate him too much but when he was first told he had frontal lobe dementia we went to a few alz cafe meetings at night -social etc he did not hate them --but i think he could comunicate better there i will try again thanks
    love bel x
     
  12. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    Hi bel,
    I know it does not work for everyone, but these social events can help, and if people can be coaxed into discussion groups locally as I was, it usually helps them come to terms with the illness.
    Good luck and keep us informed.

    Best Wishes

    kenc
     
  13. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Ken, you are always so upbeat.........but I am sure you have your 'down' moments.
    Thanks for sharing the "better times" with us. I take my hat off to you, and your good lady wife......is she nameless?.........could you introduce her.?

    Much love,
     
  14. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    Hello connie,

    My wife is called Janice and she is the one who has helped and guided me through this mine field. Although she no longer works as a Dispenser in a Chemist, she has said many times that she has a full time job with me.
    When I go to Alzheimers Society events she is always along side me or close enough to make sure I don't put my foot in it. She always reads the speeches and edits them before events, aswell as acting as go between when someone from the society rings up.
    As well as this she works tirelessly at our local branch, on the committees and fundraising, and as she has said on many occassions her life revolves around me, the society, and her Mothers Union role at our local church.
    Janice is also with me when I go to the Branch Discussion Forum Groups and acts as my mentor, which is handy when get stuck for words.
    This medication gives her a bit of freedom to do these things on her own otherwise I would drive her up the wall.
    Along with all this I have a daughter called Claire who is a qualified Biologist, and she keeps me going in the right direction. Before I was diagnosed and given the medication these two dragged me through it all, and would not given in where I was close to it many times.

    There you have it in a shortened version.

    Best Wishes

    kenc
     
  15. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi KenC

    Thanks for that.

    Janice & Claire, good to meet you. You sound a lovely family, and you are all so lucky to have each other.

    Best wishes,
     
  16. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    #16 KenC, Feb 4, 2007
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2007
    Computers

    Hi all.

    Since my medication has been stepped up I have noticed some changes which are strange and unreal. Although I am not getting better and never will, I have been doing things on the computer, which I could never fathom out while I was at work, and using the computer all day.
    This makes me think that I have had this illness longer than I had at first thought. But it is very strange that even though the brain is playing silly devils with me and my memory, that I can do things now that I could'nt before.
    This defies all logic and when I looked into it, the medication is supposed to sharpen up the brain and make it think a little clearer. What a pity it does not stop us forgetting whether we have done something or not. Still I suppose one of these bright sunny days someone will find a solution.

    Best Wishes

    ken
     
  17. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi Ken
    You have a wonderful wife and daughter and you are an inspiration to us all.
    Long may you keep fighting.
    Alfjess
     
  18. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    Dear Ken, What good news for you. I hope you continue to feel sharp and be able to work on your computer successfully.

    This feeling of `sharpness` really interests me. My husband is not on medication, other than anti-depressants and diabetic medication. I recently read that blood tests in some Alzheimer patients, showed a deficiency of Vitamins B6 B12 and B9 [folic acid]. In November 2006, I began giving my husband these vitamins, together with Vitamin E, which is supposed to help the B vitamins be effective. He has shown a noticeable improvement just recently. He wakes up and says his brain feels `crystal clear`. He is definitely `sharper` in many ways and although, in my husband, the sharpness only lasts the morning, it still makes life a lot easier.

    I thought you might be interested. Love Sylvia
     
  19. KenC

    KenC Registered User

    Mar 24, 2006
    913
    Co Durham
    Hi Sylvia,

    That sounds very interesting and no doubt my wife will look into it, as she was a dispenser in a chemists.
    Like you husband I find that things don't last for long, but while it lasts its good. I sometimes find that I am ready to switch off again at lunch time, but I suppose its the shear pressure of trying to do things properly.


    Best Wishes

    Ken
     
  20. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    Dear Ken, If your wife does look into B vitamins, I`d be very interested to know what she finds, if you don`t mind. Thank you, Sylvia
     

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