1. forgetmenot

    forgetmenot Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    25
    London
    I went to see this today at my local cinema. First I was disappointed that there was only one showing a day for this week only so people who work during the week (like myself) could not have gone unless they had seen it advertised on the Alzheimer's website. Secondly it was a very poor potrayal of what life is like with alzheimers. I have contacted the Alzheimer's society about this as it gave the wrong impression altogether what it is like to be a carer. A person with Alzheimers cannot make a decision to go in to a care home or learn about this awful condition. That is not my experience.
     
  2. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Not seen it , do you have a link to it for the trailer .

    Why did they have anything to do with the making of the film ?
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Good point - I doubt they did: this is a Canadian film.
     
  4. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Just seen the trailer . seen the wife went into care home early .

    I get the impression its more to do with the emotion feeling of the husband being parted for his wife , while he see her talking to other men in care home forgetting him while the disease progresses , how distress she look when he try to make her understand that she still his wife ?

    What do you think forgetmenot ?


    That may be why the film called forgetmenot ( if you get my point )
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    I haven't seen it but already it is discounted 66% at Amazon, which is unusual for a new film.

    Makes it more affordable for us of course, at almost £6... :)

    The challenge is that films are made for the mass market. The mass market doesn't want to know what being a carer for someone with dementia is like. They go to films to be entertained, not to be informed.

    I believe the fact that a film has been made that even mentions dementia is a great thing, even more so when the actress, who plays someone with dementia, gets awards for her performance.

    I'll get it on DVD but am just piqued that this film, plus Atonement, STILL manage to come under the £15 that gets free postage!
     
  6. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #6 Margarita, Feb 17, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2008
    Its true
    .


    may be it not do to good at the cinema , so they sell it at a cheap price because its an emotional film of feeling , seeing a love one love , being taken away with a disease , to hard emotional for the viewer to watch .




    where the Film " Not Book " had a story line twist , as they show a love story at the beginning of the film , before anyone realizes the wife has now AZ or they husband wife , as he read the woman a love story . it's like his just reading a story to friend at the beginning of the film , so that film may of done better at the cinema when it first came out
     
  7. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Have not seen the film, but I guess it's just one story.

    Quoted by forgetmenot:
    As all people are not the same, so surely all carers experiences are different.
     
  8. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,990
    Toronto, Canada
    I did see the film and I was a little disappointed also. It was not a bad film, the actors were very good, it's just the facts of AD could have been a little more accurate.

    I think it is possible for someone in early stages to make decisions about their future, I simply don't know if they would make rational, logical decisions. It would depend on the day.

    On balance, it was a better film than "The Notebook", which had Gena Rowlands' character switching from almost catatonia to complete lucidity in a matter of seconds. It was not as good as "Iris".

    I think it really was supposed to be more from the viewpoint of the husband. Gordon Pinsent is a favourite of mine so that's why I saw it.

    Overall, I would still recommend it, with the reservations mentioned.
     
  9. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #9 Margarita, Feb 17, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2008

    I do hope you do not mind me saying , but I keep reading that word
    Catatonic in reference to how people with AZ look like sometime .







    I always perceived Catatonic patients would sometimes hold rigid poses for hours . so look it up in case I was wrong

    I would not say that ena Rowlands' character was almost catatonia . Oh yes she have a complete lucidity in a matter of seconds, but only One time, when she recognized her husband in the film over a meal . The rest of the time she look like you or me , but did not recognize her husband or children , grandchildren

    I suppose we all perceive thing different

    .
     
  10. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Dementia does come into the storyline in 'Atonement' also.

    You'll just have to order extra items to get your free postage Bruce! :)
     
  11. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    that's how I sneak in the little purchases I might not otherwise have made....

    Last time I did this was to get the soundtrack CD for the first "Pirates of the Caribbean" film, which is great music. The good film soundtracks seem to have become the new classical music, with a composer who understands musical form and an orchestra of real people playing instruments well. Very little of that about today!
     
  12. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,990
    Toronto, Canada
    Maggie,
    Good point about Gena Rowlands' character. I saw the movie in the theatre when it came out & didn't like it. I guess I was just remembering one point when she seemed to be very unresponsive. Thinking back, yes, she certainly didn't know anybody but she wasn't catatonic as such. I stand corrected.:eek:

    What I should have said was how the character seemed to go from later stage AD (no recognition etc) to complete lucidity in literally seconds and then back again.

    I still don't like the movie.:)
     
  13. MJK

    MJK Registered User

    Oct 22, 2004
    54
    £6.99 including free delivery at www.play.com :)

    ...can't help on Atonement though
     
  14. forgetmenot

    forgetmenot Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    25
    London
    thank you for your comments. The woman decided to go into a care home and there was a policy of no visiting for 30 days. That itself is wrong. It did not give care homes a good image. It was a disgrace the husband having an affair with another carer. It was recommended by the Alzheimers society hence going to watch it, but as I say it was a very poor picture of both the carer and the person with dementia. The cinema is only showing it one viewing a day at mid-day which is not convenient for most people who work and care for someone with dementia, hence going on a Sunday, but it is only on this week so not going to get a good audience is it.
     
  15. sony

    sony Registered User

    I just noticed on teletext entertainment news that the US Alzheimer's Association has warned Julie Christie to be a bit more sensitive at this weekends Oscar's. This is apparantly after she joked while accepting her Screen Actors Guild Award...while giving her acceptance speech she said "And if I’ve forgotten anybody, well, it’s just that I’m still in character."

    Bit insensitive alright...!

    I haven't seen the film so can't comment further...I did catch the end of 'The Notebook' the other night though and it looked thoroughly unrealistic!!

    My Two Cents!
     
  16. sue38

    sue38 Registered User

    Mar 6, 2007
    10,856
    Wigan, Lancs
    I saw this too. Talk about 1 step forward, 2 steps back...:(
     
  17. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london

    yes Joanne now I do wonder about that also . is that just generalizing people with AZ or does it really happen is what I would like to know ?
     
  18. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Well, after the mostly negative reviews here about the film I was going to give it a miss.

    However, today I drove Jan's hairdresser the 20 miles from his house to her care home, and back, and during the journey he said "I've got a film you may like to see - it is very good".

    Of course it was this one.

    We watched it last night and to review it requires a person to wear 4 caps [at least].

    Cap 1. Carer
    Cap 2. Someone who has not experienced dementia in anyone
    Cap 3. Writer/producer/director
    Cap 4. Actor

    As a carer, there were things I recognised, and there were things that seemed bizarre. There was nothing of a hands-on 24/7 caring role but the premise of the film was that the character wanted to spare her spouse that.

    The home itself - on either floor that we saw - had no difficult residents. No really challenging behavioural scenes.

    There was none of the horrible anguish on the part of either the person with dementia, or the husband.

    Jan's hairdresser has only experienced dementia through Jan in the time he has looked after her hair, for 10 years before her dementia, and the 15 since. He watched it and took many of the very true vignettes in to his head. Nobody who has not experienced dementia first hand would really wish to see a 100% true to life film about everyday caring. There would be no audience.

    A writer/etc needs to get as many points across, but in the context of a wider story. I thought they did it well, and without unduly stressing things. The note she left him where she spelled her name wrongly - many might not have noticed that but it was very close to home for me.

    For an actor it must be so difficult not to over egg the pudding, yet still to get across the vulnerability, and Julie Christie was great - well deserved awards for her.

    Overall it was quite difficult to watch, but worth it.

    On a different level, it was lovely to see the snowy landscapes of Canada.
     
  19. Blacksheep

    Blacksheep Registered User

    Nov 2, 2006
    15
    South East
    Decided to wait for this one to come out on DVD rather than seeing at the cinema, as I hate to cry in public. Is always out on rental when I go to my local rental store.

    Watched the notebook on television in February and was annoyed at the 'sanitised' account it gave of dementia, tho' as others have pointed out, who would watch a film that showed the realities of life as a carer?
     

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