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Attendance allowance query

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by Jilly606, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. Jilly606

    Jilly606 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2017
    27
    hi has anyone experience of
    Claiming attendance allowance for LO when they don’t need help with personal care, but do need help to take meds and deal with money and bills?
     
  2. Fishgirl

    Fishgirl Registered User

    Sep 9, 2019
    98
    Hi Jilly606, yes I claim Attendance Allowance, and my OH doesn’t need help with personal care yet, but he certainly wouldn’t take meds or be able to cope with money or bills, he wouldn’t be able to cook meals for himself or anything like that, It was my son that talked me into applying a few months ago. I resisted for a while because I just assumed he wasn’t bad enough, and we can manage financially, but it’s not means tested so that doesn’t count!
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,578
    Kent
    Needing help with personal care is not the only necessity when claiming attendance allowance.

    If your person with dementia would not be safe if left alone in the house;
    If your person with dementia is likely to give a stranger access if left alone;
    eg. My husband let someone in to read the gas meter. a] it could have been anyone and b] my husband didn`t know the meter is in the garage and access to the house wasn`t necessary.
    If your person with dementia could not get help if in a crisis ; eg a fire or electrical fault.
    If your person with dementia would not be able to right a wrong; eg if they caused a flood by leaving taps on and weren`t able to realise this and turn the tap off.

    All these are relevant to Attendance Allowance.
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,534
    Female
    South coast
    Other things that cont is if they are unable to prepare themselves a meal, unable to use the washing machine, unable to plan a shopping trip or any other life skills
     
  5. Jilly606

    Jilly606 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2017
    27
    Thank you, might be worth a try, my dad can cook himself, go shopping, look after himself, goes out alone, stays in alone, drives (with mum) he can do everything except for sorting his medication (doesn’t remember how much or when) and money (doesn’t remember when money goes in or out or what bills get paid when etc can’t use cash machine cos he forgets how to use it) wasn’t sure this would be enough, hardest part will be convincing him to apply cos he hates external folk “sticking their noses in - he’s fine” it would help them a lot though even to just afford more things in house to help and day trips out for breakable etc
     
  6. Jilly606

    Jilly606 Registered User

    Dec 7, 2017
    27
    Sorry some predictive text in that
     
  7. Fishgirl

    Fishgirl Registered User

    Sep 9, 2019
    98
    If your dad can still do all those things, they may not award it but like you say there’s no harm in trying (it doesn’t stop you applying again later down the line). My OH couldn’t do any of those things by the time I applied, and a lot of the form is to do with things like that.
     
  8. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    1,031
    My mother-in-law was awarded the upper rate when she started hallucinating at night ,so needed supervision and reassurance. As others have said, being unsafe at home counts.
     
  9. Fishgirl

    Fishgirl Registered User

    Sep 9, 2019
    98
    Sorry meant to add, that when I say he doesn’t need help with personal care, he does still manage to have a wash and a shave most days (won’t take a bath or shower though) and he’d put the same clothes back on forever, if I didn’t take them and put clean ones out!:rolleyes: X
     
  10. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    No harm in trying.
    First get the form,
    https://www.gov.uk/attendance-allowance/how-to-claim An advantage of ringing 0800 731 0122 and asking to be sent one is that, if successful, the receipt of your claim can be back dated a maximum of 6 weeks from when you asked for the form. You can download a copy to practise on.

    Next make an appointment with either AgeUK or CAB to help you fill it in, they know all the correct words and phrases to use.
     
  11. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,534
    Female
    South coast
    If you have to assist someone to do something, or even just prompt them it counts, because they cant do it on their own
     
  12. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    244

    He obviously does need help with personal care if he won’t bath or shower. Take a look at the forms online and really think about the questions. Just because someone shaves it doesn’t necessarily mean he could do it if everything wasn’t provided for him. My mum can still make herself a cup of tea but it’s not drinkable. She never boils the kettle and forgets to take the tea bag out. If the milk wasn’t next to the kettle she’d never find it she doesn’t know what a fridge is! So would you say she can get herself food and drink? The answer would be no, so think carefully about each answer.
     
  13. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,534
    Female
    South coast
    You also have to fill in the form as if it were his very worst day.
    I was advised to do this by DWP - so its not cheating.
     
  14. Bunpoots

    Bunpoots Registered User

    Apr 1, 2016
    3,028
    Nottinghamshire
    When I filled in the form for my dad I thought he wasn't that bad but once I started to think about it I realised that he wouldn't take his meds properly (and hadn't for some years before I realised).
    He could make himself a coffee but he'd started keeping his milk in the cupboard instead of the fridge so it was sour.
    He could cook himself a meal of sorts but is 2 packets of cup a soup and a pound of beef, an onion and a carrot in the slow cooker really a meal?
    He could wash and shave but never washed his clothes or bedding
    He could go to the shops but couldn't always find his way home.
    Still driving but forgot where he'd parked or got lost on familiar roads.
    He was never a big drinker but when he started to have whisky in his tea at breakfast and then drive how well was he really coping?
    I thought he was sleeping at night but then I got a phone call at 4am and when I told him what time it was it meant nothing to him and wanted to know why I wasn't awake ...

    It's the little things that add up.

    Dad could still do a lot of things when he got his attendance allowance but he couldn't do them independently.
     
  15. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    I repeat.
    Go to one of the charities for free assistance.
    Maybe take a downloaded filled in form as a basis of discussion, they will soon put you right on the correct submission.
     
  16. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    244
    Has your dad got a diagnosis? My mums psychiatrist wrote a letter stating my mum had lost capacity and required 24 hour supervision because she wasn’t safe to be alone.
     
  17. Lynmax

    Lynmax Registered User

    Nov 1, 2016
    234
    Can you claim attendance allowance if the PWD still lives alone but with carers or family going in for a few hours each day to help with shopping, cooking, washing clothes, showering, taking medication, dealing with any tradesmen etc etc? We also have to keep a close eye on the finances to prevent unnecessary or scam purchases. The allowance would help a little towards the cost of the carers.
     
  18. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    244

    Yes absolutely! If you visit a PWD and help them out you can claim attendance allowance but it’s means tested. The person with dementia can also claim attendance allowance and it’s not means tested.

    https://www.gov.uk/attendance-allowance
     
  19. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,534
    Female
    South coast
    Not sure what you mean.
    Attendence Allowence is not means tested.
    If you are talking about Carers Allowence, its not exactly means tested, but you are not allowed to earn more than £123 a week, not to be in receipt of state pension and the person you are caring for has to have Attendance Allowance/Disability Living Allowance/Personal Independence Payment
     
  20. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    244

    The person with dementia can claim ‘attendance allowance’ regardless of any income. A carer can claim Carers allowance but income is taken into account I.e as you say if the carer has an income of more than 123 they can’t claim. Your explanation is so much better than mine! Thanks
     

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