App

struanstewart

New member
Sep 14, 2023
8
0
Hello,

My friend Puja and I have been working on an app for people living with dementia and their carers to help them live more autonomously. On the app the person living with dementia and their carer work together to establish what routines they need assistance with. Once set up the person living with dementia is able to carry out those routines by themselves with the guidance of their app.

We'd really appreciate speaking with anyone who might be interested in helping us to test and improve our app. If you are can you send a quick email to dementia@elselondon.com with the subject 'Test'.

Thanks,
Struan
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
5,227
0
High Peak
Once set up the person living with dementia is able to carry out those routines by themselves with the guidance of their app
Good luck with that! You do know that people with dementia are rarely able to follow instructions, no matter how clear and simple? They won't remember their carer setting it up or that they agreed to use it. They won't even remember to look at it.

There are lots of gadgets and devices already on the market to help people with dementia with their daily routines - whiteboards, dementia clocks, etc. They don't work. Even when people are still able to read, they are often not able to interpret the words or turn them into actions. It's the whole reason people need carers coming in every day, because yesterday will not be remembered.

If you could develop an app to help with toilet accidents or wandering at night that would be far more helpful.

Sorry to be so negative but people with dementia need carers not apps.
 

struanstewart

New member
Sep 14, 2023
8
0
Good luck with that! You do know that people with dementia are rarely able to follow instructions, no matter how clear and simple? They won't remember their carer setting it up or that they agreed to use it. They won't even remember to look at it.

There are lots of gadgets and devices already on the market to help people with dementia with their daily routines - whiteboards, dementia clocks, etc. They don't work. Even when people are still able to read, they are often not able to interpret the words or turn them into actions. It's the whole reason people need carers coming in every day, because yesterday will not be remembered.

If you could develop an app to help with toilet accidents or wandering at night that would be far more helpful.

Sorry to be so negative but people with dementia need carers not apps.
I appreciate the feedback. The idea is to provide people living with dementia with prompts to their mobile which tell them that it's time to use the bathroom, or that it's time to have a glass of water. This reduces the need for a carer to tell them to do these tasks. It's designed to be a very simple way of guiding someone to follow a set of instructions.

We've had feedback from other people living with dementia in which they've said they'd enjoy using this to guide them through the process of making a cup of tea without needing their carer to intervene.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
5,227
0
High Peak
I appreciate the feedback. The idea is to provide people living with dementia with prompts to their mobile which tell them that it's time to use the bathroom, or that it's time to have a glass of water. This reduces the need for a carer to tell them to do these tasks. It's designed to be a very simple way of guiding someone to follow a set of instructions.

We've had feedback from other people living with dementia in which they've said they'd enjoy using this to guide them through the process of making a cup of tea without needing their carer to intervene.
Well, I'm pleased you've had some positive results but as I'm sure others here will tell you, most people with dementia quickly lose the ability to use a mobile phone and to follow instructions. You need to remember also that using a phone is 'new' for most older people and not 'second nature' as it is for young people.

As people with dementia start to regress, things they've learned in recent years (such as mobile phones, TV remote controls, etc.) are soon forgotten unfortunately.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
24,701
0
South coast
OH forgot how to use a mobile phone long, long before he forgot how to cook, follow a recipe, use the washing machine, get washed and dressed or make a cup of tea - and he was a softwear engineer and early adopter of technology. Making a drink is probably one of the last things to be remembered. If they cant do this then they probably cant follow any instructions.
 

Neveradullday!

Registered User
Oct 12, 2022
3,229
0
England
We've had feedback from other people living with dementia in which they've said they'd enjoy using this to guide them through the process of making a cup of tea without needing their carer to intervene.
Your feedback, @struanstewart - it seems to me these people would be at the earliest stage of dementia, possibly even Mild Cognitive Impairment. Have you any feedback to say how long your gadget was useful to them?

As I hinted in another post, you will certainly have a revolving door of clients. But for how long will each one find this useful - weeks?
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
4,239
0
Victoria, Australia
I appreciate the feedback. The idea is to provide people living with dementia with prompts to their mobile which tell them that it's time to use the bathroom, or that it's time to have a glass of water. This reduces the need for a carer to tell them to do these tasks. It's designed to be a very simple way of guiding someone to follow a set of instructions.

We've had feedback from other people living with dementia in which they've said they'd enjoy using this to guide them through the process of making a cup of tea without needing their carer to intervene.
The one thing you need to understand about dementia is that people with dementia don’t often understand that they have a problem and part of this denial is that they will tell you anything. Often they resist with a definite NO but if they are exhibiting ‘hostess’ mode, they will be incredibly polite and tell you anything.

My husband has not used a mobile phone for years but still plays bridge online. He recently had a fall and I have been trying to get him to use a walking stick. He insists he doesn’t need it. He certainly won’t bother to use an app because he doesn’t really understand what it is.

He struggles to follow instructions on heating a meal in the microwave so adding the use of an app is an added complication. I don’t need to have him call me yet again asking ‘What does this mean?’ when he doesn’t understand what he is trying to read.

My point is that you are doing the right thing in asking carers because people with dementia are unreliable resources. I know you are well intentioned but perhaps a little research into your target market before you start might be a good idea.