What do you think of a hidden disabilities/dementia identifier?

Maidie

New member
Oct 31, 2021
2
0
I feel not an awful lot of people know about the sunflower lanyard perhaps it would be more useful to spread the word about the sunflower until my husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s I did not know it was only when I went into a retail shop a lady asked me to join the monthly raffle and she told me about the sunflower my husband was diagnosed 5 years ago it took me over four years to find this out.
 

Blissy

Registered User
Jan 29, 2023
67
0
My husband does not go out on his own but when with me I think something that alerts public to his condition would be helpful. I often find myself trying to discreetly indicate his dementia when he is slow responding or saying nonsensical things to people. Personally I would prefer to it to be a lapel badge.
 

TonyTwoPints

New member
Jul 22, 2022
1
0
Something is better than nothing although what is used may depend on circumstances.
I have used a lanyard with my mother whilst travelling, and it was invaluable at the airport as it was easily seen.
In other environments, a wristband would be better as it is more discreet.
 

Patken

New member
May 11, 2022
5
0
I think they would be very useful, I have tried to get a wristband made with some info on if, eg address or contact number but nobody was interested in it be cause of cost, putting a price on life again.
I still think a wristband is the answer, and will keep trying and asking people.
 

Sonya1

Registered User
Nov 26, 2022
211
0
Our Strategic Change team would like to hear your thoughts on a potential dementia 'identifier' (e.g. lanyard, wristband) to wear outside of the home.

This has recently been raised by people with dementia in two steering groups, and they want to gather further insights and test the idea more widely.

They'd like to know...
  • How would you feel if Alzheimer’s Society created a hidden disabilities/dementia ‘identifier’ to wear when out of the home?
  • What other identifiers do you know of, or use currently, that serve a similar purpose?
  • What do you feel would be the benefits of an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
  • What would be your concerns about an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
They will aim to use any feedback to understand if there is a need/desire for an identifier over and above what is already available.

Please let us know what you think. Thanks everyone :)
In principle it could be a good idea.......BUT it does mark that person out as potentially more vulnerable so I wouldn't want my loved ones to be out alone with anything too obvious on show! Having said that, a Forget-me-Not would be the obvious choice . So perhaps a lanyard or badge for those who are accompanied, which would let others know without a companion having to explain in front of the pwd. Maybe a discreet card or wristband with contact number which pwd could use if out alone and needing to contact someone?
 

TonaJ

New member
Jan 22, 2023
2
0
With My brother, he will walk off and go down the road if his wife doesn't take him somewhere when he wants to go. It's there some kind of tracker with an alarm available to her so she can find him? So far she has been able to follow him but I'm afraid the day will come she won't be able to. It's shameful to know someone out there would take advantage of any one wearing a disability lanyard.
 

Furrywillow

New member
Mar 15, 2023
2
0
I know for sure my dad would not wear or carry anything and I agree it could make them vulnerable. I’d be happy to wear a carers ID of some sort when I’m out with dad though.
 

Matchmade

Registered User
Jun 5, 2017
2
0
Until I read up about it whilst preparing this post, I didn't have a clue what the sunflower symbol means. At least a forget-me-not, with dementia-appropriate wording, gives people some guidance: the clue is in the name.

Of course I respect those who are concerned about possible abuse and targeting, but surely there are far more people willing to help than to harm, and they may need help recognising what can be confusing symptoms displayed by a PWD out on their own or separated from their carer. Even emergency services personnel might struggle to distinguish between dementia confusion or inarticulacy and symptoms of diabetes, autism, mental health challenges or drug/drink intoxication.

Please don't shoot me down, but I quite like the lanyard sold in the UK by FMN-Products as a "dementia-lanyard-with-id-card". I can't give you the URL because I don't have 10 previous postings on this site.
DementiaIDbadge20cm.jpg
 

saljak

Registered User
Mar 2, 2015
9
0
I think the sunflower lanyard is becoming more widely recognised and covers many hidden disabilities without being specific (not everyone wants strangers to know their health history).
However for those people living with dementia (and their carers) perhaps a small business card with the forget me not Alzheimer’s logo on one side and on the other side a short statement requesting for time/help as the the person has dementia.
 

Carol G

New member
May 22, 2020
2
0
My husband sometimes will wear the sunflower lanyard but he thinks it is too girly looking and would prefer something not so flowery and bright.
 

Gasnthat

Registered User
Jun 6, 2022
11
0
When I was younger we used to tie a knot in a hanky maybe a badge in that vein would work, my ohwd got on a bus today and she could not remember which stop we were getting off at, ( even though I had told her ten seconds previously) so she said what was on the destination sign on the front, when I said which stop we wanted the driver became agitated, I don't think wearing a badge/ forget-me-not is a good idea when she is out on her own but it would help in situations such as the above when accompanied.
 
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Pejic

Registered User
Jul 2, 2022
544
0
I definitely think it would be a mistake to try and compete with the sunflower lanyard but I wouldn't mind wearing a blue sunflower on the spring clip of mine as long as it was a robust fitting, but I've got a beard so I'm not too worried about people doubting my masculinity! I've also got my "give me a marmalade sandwich and send me home" card and one giving a more precise description of the consequences of my dementia, in my wallet and in my going out clothes.
I seem to get treated with more tolerance on buses and in Boots, Home Bargains, Iceland and Tesco when I'm wearing the lanyard (though I travel in a mobility scooter, anyway) but I'm not sure everyone in my GP surgery understands what it's for.
Any money left over from providing the forget me not should be spent on promoting the sunflower ribbon (and possibly persuading them to let us use the sunflower symbol on our writing paper).
 
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jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
22,627
0
Southampton
mine does have a card in his wallet saying he may need help as he might become confused. it has his name on it but also it has my contact details on it as well so if he gets lost or cant cope, they can phone me. we found out about the lanyard only because he was exempt from wearing a mask and was getting abuse about it. the wristband looks good and more discreet but unless you have i have dementia right across your forehead, people still judge on the way you behave rather than acknowledging a lanyard etc and actually trying to help and understand why you wear a lanyard. he does carry a phone and my name is first with initials ice before, in case of an emergency so they wont need to go right through his phone.
 

Youngfogee

Registered User
Mar 26, 2012
11
0
I think it is a very bad idea. It just points out to anyone who knows the identifier, that this person is open for scamming.
A person who needs support should always be escorted by someone who can look out for them.
 

Windy28

Registered User
Jan 8, 2020
133
0
With reference to the identifier to be worn outside the home. I would not like my OH to wear one as I know he is vulnerable and scared when strangers try to speak or help him. If he wanders off on his own while out in the park with the dog and gets lost he carries a card with my phone number on and can show that to someone in an emergency.
 

northumbrian_k

Volunteer Host
Mar 2, 2017
4,291
0
Newcastle
When she was still capable of going out on her own, or with me, my wife would have been livid to have been identified in this way. She did not need or want any special treatment because, in her opinion (the only one that counted) there was nothing wrong with her. To suggest otherwise was to stir up unnecessary trouble. To anyone denying - or oblivious to - their dementia, being asked to wear an identifier of any kind would seem like an insult.