What do you think of a hidden disabilities/dementia identifier?

HarrietD

Staff Member
Staff member
Apr 29, 2014
9,556
0
London
Our Strategic Change team would like to hear your thoughts on a potential dementia 'identifier' (e.g. lanyard, wristband) to wear outside of the home.

This has recently been raised by people with dementia in two steering groups, and they want to gather further insights and test the idea more widely.

They'd like to know...
  • How would you feel if Alzheimer’s Society created a hidden disabilities/dementia ‘identifier’ to wear when out of the home?
  • What other identifiers do you know of, or use currently, that serve a similar purpose?
  • What do you feel would be the benefits of an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
  • What would be your concerns about an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
They will aim to use any feedback to understand if there is a need/desire for an identifier over and above what is already available.

Please let us know what you think. Thanks everyone :)
 

Dunroamin

Registered User
May 5, 2019
405
0
UK
An obvious identifier would leave a person open to abuse. A discreet waterproof wristband would be fine. A lanyard for use in airports is useful but apart from that my answer would be no.
 

thistlejak

Registered User
Jun 6, 2020
480
0
We already have the sunflower lanyards for hidden disabilities in use. They don't specify what disability so don't discriminate. They have been in use for years.
I suppose you could add a forget me not badge onto the sunflower lanyard if you wanted to identify dementia specifically but I too am not sure that it wouldn't make the person more vulnerable.
 
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jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
22,626
0
Southampton
my husband wore the sunflower lanyard in covid times just so he didnt get shouted at because he was exempt from face mask. im not sure a specific sign would be the best thing as he could become targeted by thieves, muggers and when taking money from cashpoint. being older already makes him more vulnerable so to add to that wouldnt be in his best interests. we already have the helping hands cards so i can be contacted if there is a problem. alzheimers society do them as well.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
29,895
0
Bury
I agree with other posters, sunflower lanyards are useful in airport where they identify wearer, and usually accompanying escort, for special treatment.
Identifying somebody as having dementia in general public gives out an easily conned message and I think should be avoided.
 

Arty.T

New member
Mar 15, 2023
1
0
Someone may be happy to wear a lanyard, wrist band or carry a card. I think it comes down to the individual choice and may be more beneficial to someone who tends to wander. I think we are all scared off things happening to us/family members, but if someone gets in a stressful situation and they are can be quickly identified as needing more time and help then it is a good thing.
 

TrulyScrumptious

Registered User
Jun 6, 2022
11
0
I think it would be a good thing to have an identifier as an option that can be worn when appropriate but not when the person would be vulnerable.
I am thinking of when my OH goes out with other people or his children who wouldn’t necessarily like to get into discussions or even me when we are out and he does something unexpected
 

Pejic

Registered User
Jul 2, 2022
544
0
I think it would be best to stick with the sunflower lanyard, then we can concentrate on making everybody understand what that is, proliferating different badges and lanyards and symbols just confuses other people.

Mind you, something a bit more robust to hang on the spring clip would be a good idea, the skinny strip of plastic on the Altzheimer's card they provide is easily broken if it get snagged on anything.
 

kawarider

Registered User
Aug 3, 2020
18
0
We already have the sunflower lanyards for hidden disabilities in use. They don't specify what disability so don't discriminate. They have been in use for years.
I suppose you could add a forget me not badge onto the sunflower lanyard if you wanted to identify dementia specifically but I too am not sure that it wouldn't make the person more vulnerable.
I agree 100%. I have been thinking about a Sunflower lanyard for my other half for use in the airport enroute to our cruise and on board for the ship's company. I mentioned it to my Daughter in law (a community nurse) she is concerned about ne'er do well's reading the name on the badge and pretending to know them. I think the forget me not added to the icons available at the moment would be of use, for those that recognise the lanyard's meaning. until yesterday I had no knowledge of it. I think that would apply to 99% of the world population. I don't think the wheel should be re-invented. the addition of the forget-me-not to the list of icons when you are constructing your own, would be ideal and much less work to achieve.
 

Jaxx

Registered User
Jun 2, 2015
18
0
Preston, Lancashire
My mum has Alzheimer’s and she often gets stuck trying to find words. So I had a badge made that explains says ‘My name is Helen. I have Alzheimer’s. If I’m lost call (me) on 07XXXXXXXXX.’

Mum has told me this has helped her a great deal especially in shops when she’s on her own as she gets flustered and confused. The staff in the shops read her badge and know she’ll need more time.
 

Anon33

Registered User
Jul 28, 2019
61
0
I think it may make a vulnerable person more vulnerable. we did have a sunflower lanyard. My parents do not have any appreciation of their illness, so we’re reluctant to wear it or ask for help. Maybe it would have helped me if I had worn something that identified me as a carer of someone with dementia, when I am out with them. I think that might help in shops and appointments etc. potentially?
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
22,626
0
Southampton
the males that have to wear the lanyards may not appreciate forget-me-nots being there. i know there are sunflowers on the lanyard but it was quite a neutral colour.
when i used to run playschemes and taking children out, they couldnt have any identification on them including name or organisation that a person could come up to them and chat to them about. i think the same should be the cases of PWD. its very easy to strike up a conversation when they know something about you. they are too vulnerable to take chances with outward signs.
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
1,938
0
I think that it would be useful when the PWD is being accompanied somewhere but not when the person is out on his/her own.
 

pange

New member
May 16, 2022
1
0
I think this is a great idea, I have noticed when I go shopping with my mother's and she's a little slow or not sure how to pay, the cashier can be impatient. Something with the blue forget me knot
 

Mumlikesflowers

Registered User
Aug 13, 2020
181
0
My first thought was has there been research done on whether people have found existing identifiers useful or not. I like the arrangement Jaxx and her Mum came to. I also agree that it makes sense to increase awareness of the sunflower lanyard. People with mental health issues or a learning disability or people with brain injury, for instance, could easily have similar kinds of struggles as a person with dementia might out in public. I prefer to see the commonality.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
29,895
0
Bury
I agree 100%. I have been thinking about a Sunflower lanyard for my other half for use in the airport enroute to our cruise and on board for the ship's company. I mentioned it to my Daughter in law (a community nurse) she is concerned about ne'er do well's reading the name on the badge and pretending to know them.
The name does not have to be displayed, the lanyard is to identify some who needs assistance.
In my area the some hospitals promote the use of a lanyard which can be picked up free at reception and various places around the town.
They were introduced to hand out to people, especially those without an escort, so they would be identified if looking confused in the hospital,

1400_440bury3.png
 

Maidie

New member
Oct 31, 2021
2
0
Our Strategic Change team would like to hear your thoughts on a potential dementia 'identifier' (e.g. lanyard, wristband) to wear outside of the home.

This has recently been raised by people with dementia in two steering groups, and they want to gather further insights and test the idea more widely.

They'd like to know...
  • How would you feel if Alzheimer’s Society created a hidden disabilities/dementia ‘identifier’ to wear when out of the home?
  • What other identifiers do you know of, or use currently, that serve a similar purpose?
  • What do you feel would be the benefits of an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
  • What would be your concerns about an Alzheimer’s Society branded dementia identifier?
They will aim to use any feedback to understand if there is a need/desire for an identifier over and above what is already available.

Please let us know what you think. Thanks everyone :)