Vascular Dementia / Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Tricot

Registered User
Jun 20, 2017
310
0
France
Please could those caring for someone with vascular dementia tell me if they've found it true that progression happens in noticeable stages? Or can it be more gradual like Alzheimer's? After 7 years I finally have a diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease which means there's a greater likelyhood of progressing to vascular dementia. Some days I feel much worse than others and my brain works very slowly. I don't know at what point the diagnosis changes from one to the other. If you care for someone in this category perhaps you could tell me.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
24,135
0
Southampton
Please could those caring for someone with vascular dementia tell me if they've found it true that progression happens in noticeable stages? Or can it be more gradual like Alzheimer's? After 7 years I finally have a diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease which means there's a greater likelyhood of progressing to vascular dementia. Some days I feel much worse than others and my brain works very slowly. I don't know at what point the diagnosis changes from one to the other. If you care for someone in this category perhaps you could tell me.
my husband has vascular dementia. it goes down in steps rather than gradual. the memory is not affected as much as sequencing and logic. my husband was diagnosed almost 4 years ago now and still goes out on his own, and is quite independent. hope that gives you hope.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,293
0
Hello @Tricot I do not know much about Vascular Dementia but i have attached a link that you might find useful.
 

jay6

Registered User
Jun 25, 2023
1,075
0
My husband was diagnosed with vascular a year ago, although the Dementia doctor now says he has probably had it for at least 6/7 years. After going through different periods e.g. Nastiness etc. and suffering a major bleed to brain.
Depends what part of the brain is affected. Unfortunately my OH has frontal so its all about personality and apathy. It can be really hard sometimes to know how much is dementia and how much it is the dementia high lightning his normal personality, which has never been easy.
He can still was and dress even with loss of one arm from the stroke. Get himself a drink, food etc. Still knows who everyone is and what's going on. But you can't reason with him because he will always be right, no matter what! Although it has been part of his personality before the stroke or dementia so its hard to know if anything's changed there.
The hardest part of all this has been his nastiness towards me. (one one else) The only time he speaks is if he wants something.
The 'steps' have been more like phases he goes through e.g. Went through phase of violence a few years ago but luckily it stopped. But I think it could be more to do with frustration because he can't do what he used to since his stroke.
It's really hard to tell you how vascular will affect someone as I said its different, depending on what part of the brain is affected.
 

Tricot

Registered User
Jun 20, 2017
310
0
France
The hardest part of all this has been his nastiness towards me. (one one else) The only time he speaks is if he wants something.
I'm so sorry you have to suffer this treatment. One of the few compensations of being alone is that I know whatever the future holds, I will never be inflicting mean behaviour on people I love. I don't know how all you carers cope as well as you do.
 

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
7,343
0
Nottinghamshire
Both my mother and mother in law had vascular dementia. Certainly with my mother in law steps down were noticeable, but what was also noticeable as that after a dip she improved quite a bit. Not quite to where she was before but not far off. My mother's decline was more linear, in her case it was the loss of logic rather than memory that started to cause concern.
 

SelahRosario

Registered User
Feb 22, 2024
28
0
Hello. My grandma had a similar situation, and the progression seemed to have stages, but they weren't always super clear. Some days were tougher than others. We found keeping a journal of her good and challenging days helped us understand the patterns. Connecting with a support group also gave us insights from others going through it.
 

sdmhred

Registered User
Jan 26, 2022
2,317
0
Surrey
Hello @Tricot

I’m sorry to hear of your diagnosis.

We noticed subtle changes in mum around 2017, but in 2019 she was told some memory impairment but not at a dementia level. It became apparent in 2021 that things had progressed and she was diagnosed that year.

I’d say yes for us it has been in stages.

Mum however has been a joy throughout and had a fulfilling time until her mobility became very difficult. She still however retains a positive and cheery outlook and makes the most of things. She’s now early late stage I would say - in a nursing home needing complete care.

Do read my diary thread ‘Our Bittersweet Magic Moments’ if you like,

Keep posting.
 

Tricot

Registered User
Jun 20, 2017
310
0
France
Mum however has been a joy throughout and had a fulfilling time until her mobility became very difficult. She still however retains a positive and cheery outlook and makes the most of things.

Do read my diary thread ‘Our Bittersweet Magic Moments’ if you like,
Hello @sdmhred
Thank you for responding. It's so nice to read how happy and positive your mum is in spite of the dementia. I'll have a look at your diary thread.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
24,135
0
Southampton

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