Using word to spell-check your thread.

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Dementia Talking Point' started by Anne54, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. Anne54

    Anne54 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2004
    147
    Nottingham
    #1 Anne54, Dec 8, 2004
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2004
    In word type your thread.

    Type what you want to say,
    High-light the text, then
    Hold down the Ctrl button (bottom left of your keyboard)
    Then press c
    Now go to the message page, as if you were going to type your message again but instead hold down the Ctrl button then press v
    The text from word should now appear as if by magic.

    Anne
     
  2. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Anne
    or type the message in word and spell check it.
    highlight and click on copy.
    Got to the message reply page make sure the curser is there amd click paste.Should appear like more magic
    Regards
    Norman
     
  3. Anne54

    Anne54 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2004
    147
    Nottingham
    Norman

    That sounds a lot simpler thanks.

    Anne
     
  4. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Or just don't bother. Pople will probableee no wot you're tawlking about anywaysee! Oi thunc.

    Chosca
     
  5. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Chesca
    I don't think the spelling is that important, it's what the posting is all about that counts.
    Folks crying out for help and advice is the same message however it is spelt,
    all best wishes
    Norman
     
  6. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Norman! Excactly. 'A' bloody Men to that!

    The day a degree in Eng lit or oanguage is reuiqred to voice one's opinions, feelings or the price of a gbag o f chips I'll show my aspidistra on hte local town cryers' wheely bin. Does anybody relive velive that having been to your own hell and black, and in its personal deliverance of that, somebody will actually take the tiem to say: somebody there having a major crisisi, similar to that which nearly destroyed my life ..................and a well punctuated sentence would have made all the difference? Don't think so.

    The day a Masters in caring is awarded, despite all the mappings of despicable politicos (I'm sorry, children not allowed) and the PC, Ill be up there completely unpunctuated, complete with appropriate waffle - more than your average intellectual! could ever hope to bat. And then I'll start really laughing.

    Chesac
     
  7. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Hi there - Cool it - not so heavy !!!!!

    It was little me that began this & for my own benefit !!!!! - wasnt criticising anyone elses writing !!!

    I jsut find it incredibly irritating that I can hand write with few spelling errors but when I type (as I'm thinking) - I continually get 2 adjacent letters round the wrong way. (These are when letters are made through typing one with left hand and the next one with the right hand - if i type slowly it sOK) I have noticed htsi in one ot two other peopel (NOT on this Forum) !!! - Am jsut waiting fo r someone to say that , after analysign emails and forum messages - htis is a first sign of Alzheimres !!!!! (Did you all catch the news recently where some bright spark has analysed Iris Murdochs last book and hsa beenable to chart the progress of her Alzheimers ?)

    BW

    Chris
     
  8. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Whoops! And many agolopies!

    Chesac
     
  9. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Thats OK - I am now typing at a slow and regular speed - a la Mavis Beacons Typing course and it is much better. Think I need 'something' to calm me down - maybe hyperactivity can be a part of the bereavement process as well as times feeling totally exhausted?

    Take care . BW Chris
     
  10. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Dear Chris

    I do believe hyperactivity is a diversionary tactic - it's called displacement activity apparently. A recently bereaved friend has cleaned cupboards where she didn't even know she had cupboards and if she cleans the tiling much more she'll need to replace it - and much of this in the middle of the night. Then she wonders why she is exhausted. I've never underestimated the exhaustion of emotional upheaval - and you have had more than your fair share. Be gentle with yourself. Fingers on the home keys.

    Best wishes
    Chesca
     
  11. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    unrelated comment but something I have noted:

    while I often find my fingers run ahead of my brain, and letters come out somewhat jumbled ['all the right ones, not necessarily in the right order'], if I find this happens frequently in the course of a sentence or two, I reach to have my magic migraine pills to hand, because for sure I have an attach [meant 'attack' but it is the first wrong word so I'm not sorried (that's a second error - more worried now!) ] coming on.

    Jan always felt her head a little numb at the back after one of her faints - and this is similar to the after effects of a bad migraine attack.

    The brain is a very complex thing, and when the electrics go squiffy, either temporarily or permanently, the results are not good. Stating the obvious, of course.
     
  12. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Chris & Chesca
    hyperactivity is a diversionary tactic.
    I have noticed that when I am upset,angry,frustrated I always find jobs to do.
    Cut grass,clean things,any things,work work work.
    This nearly always happens when I am pushed to the limit and my patience runs out.
    I too end up exhausted.
    As we wll know one cannot reason,discuss with AD so this is when the diversionary tactic comes into play.
    Norman
     
  13. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Dear Bruce

    My electrics are indeed going squiffy, and I don't mean the one's lighting the tree. Sometimes I find it quite scary. Can't point out anything definite, just a sensation that all is not right. My concentration levels are zilch sometimes. But I suspect this is more to do the depression accompanying all of this, or should I say I hope..............

    Chesca
     
  14. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Chesca

    funny you should say so but I was at the surgery just this morning telling my GP how I think I've suffered collateral damage as a result of Jan's condition. I got the "thank goodness you have accepted you have depression" speech from him.

    I guess this is common to all carers.

    I can't concentrate on doing things or reading, flit from thing to thing like an inebriated butterfly, and suffer sudden dips into severe depression. [and yes, there is always the fear. This is how Jan started!]

    The GP says I have reactive depression and agrees with me that medication is not the answer. He reckons I have worked out a survival methodology and should stick with it.

    My worry is that Sam Carter didn't look so good to me yesterday on either of the Stargate programmes!
     
  15. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Hello Bruce

    Just wanted to empathise.

    What works for one doesnt work for another - but with a great deal of effort I find deciding on a very small job that is important to me at the tme - then getting it done and sayng Right Thats it - Achievement - now I'm allowed to switch off - works - well - sometimes ! [Come to think of it i may have got this idea from TP - mayb eyou !!! If so - TP works well too !!!]

    Take care of yourself - thats the most important bit.

    Chris
     
  16. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Dear Bruce

    I can identify with all you say, except, of course the Sam Carter bit, heaven forbid!

    I start something, then all of a sudden can't see the point. It was suggested to me last week that I appeared, be it from a sense of duty, or whatever, subconsciously hell bent on going down with the ship - that as Mum deteriorates so do I. Don't know what was going on there! Above all, I hate the instrospection of it all, the selfish indulgence of wallowing even though sometimes it feels out of control. Time to give myself a good shake, I think. I sometimes feel that I need a battery start-up, a damned good jolt.

    Back to the Beano.

    Chesca
     
  17. Anne54

    Anne54 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2004
    147
    Nottingham
    Dear Chesca

    I have been sent this as an e-mail, I see what you mean about spelling.

    Anne


    The Amazing Human Mind

    I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdenieg.
    The phaonemneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aodccrnig to a rscheearch at
    Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dnsoe't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a
    wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer
    be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll
    raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the hmuan mnid deos not
    raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.. Azmanig huh?
    yaeh and I awlyas tghuoht slpeling was ipmorantt
     
  18. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    Maziamng! Ot rulty si.

    Hascec
    yyy
     
  19. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    When you go on a journey you never know what you will find !!!!!

    What did I start when I simply asked if we could have a Spell Checker on this Forum !!!!!!

    I was really surprised I could read this at all - yet alone read it very quickly !!!!!

    I'm printing it out to test people !!!! Maybe the speed at which you read it is a test of AD ? No - dont lets go there !!!
     
  20. Chesca

    Chesca Guest

    I'm going to print it off to see how many people who have had too many toots of their favourite tipple over the holiday get it right. Chris, you may have been the inventor of a new parlour game when you first asked the question!

    Chesca
     

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