TV that doesn't need a Remote Control

Nessa456

Registered User
Nov 19, 2004
131
0
West Midlands
Does anyone know of a TV that doesn't need a remote control? ie whereby you change channels etc via buttons on it (as with old fashioned TV's)

My Father has a habit of either fiddling with the remote control so that the TV tuning settings go or losing the remote.

I thought that if we could find a TV that doesn't need a remote we'd solve the missing remote problem

He has his TV in his room at the care home he lives at and to be honest I don't think he's able to turn the TV on
himself so it's reliant on whether he has visitors (I get the impression the staff never think to put it on for him as it's usually unplugged whenever we visit)

Items like the remote control are very likely to get lost - this happens with his glasses as well. We labelled the last 2pairs we bought him and amazingly at least one of these new pairs is still in his room - this is good going!

But now the remote's gone - It's very frustrating!
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
17,554
0
68
Toronto, Canada
Would a radio be more appropriate? Less potential for losing it, for one thing. And it's something that's easy for the staff to put on, once you set the station (and ask that it not be changed).
 

tobermoryboy

Registered User
Mar 4, 2013
2
0
North West UK
TV that operates from Simple buttons (not Remote)

Although this is an old post, it is still a very good question..
A radio just doesn't cut it as a substitute.
My mother is not able to operate a Remote, and now has two with her Set-top box provided via UK Digital. Currently the set bottom (top) box turns itself off each night and most of us (i.e. me, my partner, her carers,) are not able to turn it back on without a lot of plugging, unplugging, button pressing. Our daughter manages best but even she cannot get it to be a "one button" option
As for my Mother she is unable to cope with anything "new" (or different), meaning she really can't cope with the Gas Fire, her new oven etc. let alone remote boxes whose buttons she can neither see nor understand, (I work in IT but have no idea of what the varying remote buttons do!).
It cannot be so difficult for a TV manufacturer to see a market here and devise a "Big Button" TV similar to the Phones now available (we looked at "Big Button Remotes" some time ago but they are too "hit and miss" with which equipment they operate.)
The Alzheimers might be able to put this to manufacturers who service this area (Doro ?) that there is a niche here that could be profitable.
 

snedds57

Registered User
Jun 15, 2011
192
0
Berwick upon Tweed
some TVs have a drop down menu with a +/- button to change channel and volume. You might be able to pick up an older style tv on something like a freecycle site which may work with a digital box/dish with buttons. Perhaps it's time someone invented one as an aid for people with dementia! :)
 

tobermoryboy

Registered User
Mar 4, 2013
2
0
North West UK
Thanks for suggestions - very quick response

Thanks guys
I think it is unlikely that a "drop down menu" would really help in our situation, even if we could find one to work with Mums older TV, and Set Top Box.

I have looked at a new "Freeview TV" but have held off as they all operate with remotes and have very small inaccessible, controls on the set.

The alzproducts remote might help if it will operate both the Panasonic TV and the Grundig Set-top box (replacing two remotes) at least the Carers and I could operate it!My mother would not (but as she doesn't anyway thats no issue)

We have already tried the Sony one and the "PowerPlus Jumbo Universal" so I have doubts, but a money back offer probably makes it worth a try.
 

nmintueo

Registered User
Jun 28, 2011
844
0
UK
Although this is an old post, it is still a very good question..
A radio just doesn't cut it as a substitute.
My mother is not able to operate a Remote, and now has two with her Set-top box provided via UK Digital. Currently the set bottom (top) box turns itself off each night and most of us (i.e. me, my partner, her carers,) are not able to turn it back on without a lot of plugging, unplugging, button pressing. Our daughter manages best but even she cannot get it to be a "one button" option
As for my Mother she is unable to cope with anything "new" (or different), meaning she really can't cope with the Gas Fire, her new oven etc. let alone remote boxes whose buttons she can neither see nor understand

It is a still a good question. I've never seen any current digital TV that has favourite-channel buttons like old-fashioned TVs used to do in the days when there were just a few broadcast channels.

Most TV sets do have controls on them somewhere, so that it is possible - but not necessarily that easy - to use them without a remote.

In many cases the problem isn't that the user doesn't understand what the remote is for, but that the remote is overcomplicated and provides unnecessary functions. A simple remote may enable the user to manage the basic functions of the TV. The Doro remote suggested above from www.alzproducts.co.uk (or cheaper elsewhere) is a good possibility.

Clearly the set-up you have at the moment with a TV and a set-top box and two remotes is giving too much trouble. See recent thread:

Ideas for a simple to use TV
http://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/showthread.php?54333
 

Lulabelle

Registered User
Jul 2, 2012
303
0
South West France
Thanks guys
I think it is unlikely that a "drop down menu" would really help in our situation, even if we could find one to work with Mums older TV, and Set Top Box.

I have looked at a new "Freeview TV" but have held off as they all operate with remotes and have very small inaccessible, controls on the set.

The alzproducts remote might help if it will operate both the Panasonic TV and the Grundig Set-top box (replacing two remotes) at least the Carers and I could operate it!My mother would not (but as she doesn't anyway thats no issue)

We have already tried the Sony one and the "PowerPlus Jumbo Universal" so I have doubts, but a money back offer probably makes it worth a try.

I had to abandon the TV and set-top box as Mum just could not get the idea that she had to turn on 2 boxes (even with only 1 remote; a universal one) and the Freeview box kept turning itself off overnight so it was impossible. I ended up getting her a new Panasonic flat screen TV with only one remote which, fortunately, she can operate although she keeps pressing the subtitles button but it could be worse.
I no longer have her phoning me daily saying that the TV doesn't work.
Of course, if funds for a new digital telly aren't available, that does not solve your problem.