Truth about dementia tv prog tonight just aired

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by crybabe, May 19, 2016.

  1. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,929
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...'memories' (in the widest sense) may still be 'there', they have not been destroyed, but the ability to retrieve them has been lost..."

    Or maybe they are stored in an unusual part of the brain, this could preclude a cure as the normal storage may have been destroyed.

    Amygdala instead of hypocampus

    Have a look at bookcase analogy if you haven't seen it.

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/9iOnxYbdrrE?autoplay=1
     
  2. looviloo

    looviloo Registered User

    May 3, 2015
    464
    Female
    Cheshire
    We watched it too, and agree it was a sanitised version of dementia - I felt cross & irritated that 'dementia' and 'alzheimers' were used interchangeably. Also, what about confusion, delusions, paranoia, hallucinations, inability to reason, swallowing, speech problems, aggression, incontinence, mobility, disorientation... ?! The bit about the iPad app could be useful for some, but my dad would never be able to use an iPad let alone the app!

    This made me wonder about the validity of the trial described in the earlier part of the programme, regarding early onset dementia. I suppose it requires evidence from all angles but I was left feeling disappointed, knowing that we are still a long way from finding out the root cause :-(
     
  3. keegan2

    keegan2 Registered User

    Jan 11, 2015
    190
    I was disappointed with last night's programme. Yes there were a few interesting bits. Also everyone in the program seemed to be fairly well off it did not show how financially draining the disease can be on families. I realise in one hour it would be hard to show every aspect of what carers do. This morning hubby was tired and I had to feed him his breakfast with his eyes closed juggle that with getting ready for work and getting little man ready for school easy peas. The Americans were all well groomed and having fun what am I doing wrong I cannot even get other half to walk around the garden without holding his hand. Again different stages of disease different problema. Everyone put in one basket read do crosswords exercise keep brain working. However if you have the bad gene nothing will save you. .....
     
  4. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,929
    Male
    North Manchester
    "However if you have the bad gene nothing will save you. ....."

    At least the cause of the increased risk is known and the controversial gene therapy technique could help.
     
  5. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,509
    Ireland
    Haven't seen the program, as I've never had TV. But I remember in class years ago, our tutor talked about a study that was done on a group of nuns (because of similar lifestyle over a long number of years, I think - they made a good control group)- as they aged. And after death, it was actually found that the Reverend Mother's brain showed the placques of advanced alzheimer's disease - but she had showed no symptoms. She had been a lifelong scholar of languages, and of course in the convent, they also sang a lot, their habits were extremely regular, with exercise built into every day, plus she did translation work - so they came to the conclusion that her very high intellectual ability, her lifelong learning & education, plus the regularity of her daily life, the exercise, the singing etc. all worked to enable her brain to just bypass the disease for long enough that it never affected her noticeably. My own husband was able to "hide" or bypass his symptoms for years too, and he had also been a lifelong scholar, who spoke several languages. He was well into the middle stages of the disease before it became really noticeable to others. There had been changes in his personality - his paranoia had increased. But the memory problems, the problems with words - he was able to sidestep those for years. His consultant explained it like this: He said that the more active we are, mentally & physically, the more neural pathways our brain builds (and he included things like spending time in nature, meditation in "activity"). So, when alzheimers' disease starts damaging the brain, and we come against a "block" - the brain can just divert along a different neural pathway - and can continue to do that for much longer, the more pathways we have.
    Unfortunately, for William, once he reached a certain point, it seemed as if his decline was pretty rapid then - but his consultant said it wasn't really. It was just that he could no longer "divert" any more - there weren't enough neural pathways left undamaged anymore. So it seemed like a sudden deterioration, when in fact he had just reached the middle/later stage.
     
  6. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,952
    Suffolk
    We had the same, though not as marked as William. Again, I put it down to intelligence and mental activity.
     
  7. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,509
    Ireland
    Well that's the thing, isn't it? My husband would do nothing either. He would take part in no activities. He used to be an excellent chess player, although I never played. But once he realised he was having difficulty with playing - he stopped trying, and refused to ever play again. The same with his painting. Once he wasn't able to do it "well enough" to satisfy him - he refused to even try. Crosswords gave way to Wordsearch - and then when they got difficult, he stopped those too. Thankfully, he loved to walk around until he died. A little too much so, at times! And he always loved to watch music, travel, wildlife and nature documentaries. But no point in trying to get him to "join in" with anything!
     
  8. tigerlady

    tigerlady Registered User

    Nov 29, 2015
    427
    One thing it did make clear was that it was a disease and not just the effects of aging. How I wish this could be accepted by the authorities so that funding could be in place without people having to fight battles all the while. I know there is not enough money in the system, but when I hear about the wasteful and silly spending of any government, it does make me mad!!

    Just read a thread about someones parents having paid £400,000 to a care home for their care - now the money has run out the LA are wanting a top up of £300 a week to keep the father in the same home he has been in for 9 years - its scandalous! A person with any other disease would not be treated like that.
     
  9. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,650
    North West
    Well said tigerlady. The Prime Minister is on record as agreeing it's a disease so why isn't it treated like other diseases, i.e. why is there this absurd distinction between care needs and health needs?
     
  10. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,650
    North West
    Thanks nitram. It's an interesting clip. My problem with is that the idea doesn't really fit very well with what I observe every day with Sue, though it may ring a lot of bells with other people. For example, Sue's long and short-term memory are equally inaccessible, it would seem. But it's also the case that occasionally something - some music (though not as much now), something someone says or reads to her, meeting someone she hasn't seen for a while - will trigger a response that suggests that some connection has been made, though her lack of language makes it very hard to explore this. And this has always suggested to me that the problem is not one of lost memories but the failure of the retrieval system.

    I certainly agree with the conclusion, 'there is more to the person than the dementia'.
     
  11. beverrino

    beverrino Registered User

    Jan 12, 2015
    1,111
    I too was very disappointed with the program! learning another language and thinking more, well maybe as a way of trying to hold it back - but honestly - 'the TRUTH about dementia' - really!!

    In Dementia Awareness week, I expected better television screening and more programs not this!

    sad to see this missed opportunity by the BBC
     
  12. valmo

    valmo Registered User

    Oct 5, 2015
    32
    Yes I watched this. Even tho I did learn something, Angela's continual 'smiling' annoyed me. That Bob bit was just too unreal and I don't believe she looked after her mother 24hr a day 52 weeks a year. She wouldn't be smiling so much.
     
  13. Missy

    Missy Registered User

    Dec 18, 2006
    71
    She didn't look after her mother full time - I am sure I read that she took the decision to go down the care home route.
     
  14. looviloo

    looviloo Registered User

    May 3, 2015
    464
    Female
    Cheshire
    #34 looviloo, May 20, 2016
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
    It felt to me as though the whole dementia issue was being skirted around because it was just 'too uncomfortable'. I know they only had an hour and could probably fill a series, but it was misleading to call it the 'truth'...

    I like Angela Rippon but she seemed quite awkward in this. I'm sure it's a difficult subject for her and I'm guessing (hoping?) she has more insight than the programme showed.
     
  15. Bunpoots

    Bunpoots Registered User

    Apr 1, 2016
    2,917
    Nottinghamshire
    I was very disappointed in the program. Totally sugar coated the whole issue. I didn't learn anything useful or even new. And Angela Rippon came over as annoyingly smug about how fit she is at 71
     
  16. Lulu

    Lulu Registered User

    Nov 28, 2004
    391
    last night's programme

    Another very light and airey fairy programme - very disappointing. Why don't they give such a documentary to someone like Louis Theroux? Someone needs to show the realities! Someone needs to show how it all really is.
     
  17. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,080
    North Bucks
    Anodyne

    : anodyne



    1.


    not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull


    bland, inoffensive, innocuous, neutral, unobjectionable, unexceptionable, unremarkable, commonplace, dull, tedious, run-of-the-mill
     
  18. Mollygoose

    Mollygoose Registered User

    Dec 19, 2014
    52
    Lincolnshire
    Tv

    I watched the program ! It was good I thought but it didn't show the double incontinence that goes with it or swallowing problems or the lack of balance ! So not really a true picture
     
  19. Otiruz

    Otiruz Registered User

    Nov 28, 2015
    255
    Kent
    I agree with just about everything everyone has said my only additional comment is that at the very least it was on mainstream television at primetime.
     
  20. Lulu

    Lulu Registered User

    Nov 28, 2004
    391
    Really sorry to hear that, Kassy. I contacted the BBC a few days ago, prior to this going out, about Louis Theroux (or similar) looking into this, and the programme last night has me incensed. Why can't the AS forward all these replies to the BBC? Why can't someone show the reality?
     

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