1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. stevet2607

    stevet2607 Registered User

    Jun 10, 2008
    15
    Hi everyone
    I've been reading the forum for a while, guess its time I wrote my own thread. Dad is 77, after a scan was diagnosed with VD around 3 years ago. Apart from a few TIA's in his 60's and some high BP he's fit and healthy. The problem first became noticeable with a loss of words. I didnt take too much notice because Dad would always have gaps in his sentences while he found the exact word he needed, I guess he is / was a perfectionist. In the early days he became angry and had mood swings but the Dr soon leveled those off with some medication. He sees a specialist every 6 months and I went with him and he didnt really deteriorate much. 1 year ago I took a job in the USA but manage to get home every 3 months. I managed to get EPA before I left. In the last year I've found it so very difficult to help him. He simply cannot construct a sentence either verbally or written, hunts for completely the wrong often complicated word, gets very confused over numbers, and sees absolutely everything in life as a problem. I know he dreads opening the mail because the contents confuse him so much. He's an intelligent man and gets so frustrated with his disability.

    His consultant got him on a 6 week speech therapy course but Dad sees this as schoolwork and childish exercises when the whole point is to exercise the dead part of his brain. I managed to see the therapist last week when I was in the UK but Dad just argued with her.

    I feel helpless being so far away. His inability to talk makes phone calls extremely upsetting for both of us, and I feel so guilty I'm not there for him. (I promised my Mum I would look after him just before she died)

    I get some support just reading the threads here but the questions I want to ask dont have real or definitive answers. Should I go home? Does he need daily care? When WILL he need daily care that I can give him? When will he need more specialist care? Can anyone tell me what to expect next? If Dad is healthy in every other way can he simply die of VD?

    He gets extremely confused over money and the solicitor has suggested we visit when I'm next in UK to maybe move to full Power of attorney. I'm worried he will make a mistake over money and I read stories on here about people going out and not knowing where they are, halucinating etc. I know that when that happens I need to be near, but if only I knew when that might be.

    I dont expett too many answers, but its been good for me to get it off my chest. Any thoughts or comments would be of great help, thanks, Steve
     
  2. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Steve, welcome to TP.

    Your dad's symptoms sound very similar to the way my husband started. Loss of language, number, ability to handle money, but physically very fit. He too was a very intelligent man.

    I'd get the EPA registered as soon as possible, and I'd think you'd need to be making plans either to return to look after him, or set up some care plan for him.

    The loss of language make independent living very difficult.

    John actually remained very fit for seven years after diagnosis, until a UTI last year caused him to lose mobility and balance. His particular form of dementia is Primary Progressive Aphasia -- it's quite rare, byt if you google it you'll get more information. Not saying that's what your dad has, of course, but you might be interested to read the description.

    Otherwise, have you found the AS factsheets? They make interesting reading.

    http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/factsheets

    All the best,
     

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