Technology & Smart House at Gloucester

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Resources' started by Chris, Sep 23, 2004.

  1. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    http://www.dementia-voice.org.uk/Projects/Projects_GloucesterProject.htm

    The Gloucester Smart House

    In partnership with Housing 21 and the Bath Institute of Medical Engineering, Dementia Voice has converted an ordinary 3-bedroom house on a sheltered housing complex into a dementia-friendly environment that demonstrates how new technology can assist people with dementia to remain independent for longer.
    The Gloucester Smart House, as it is called, was launched on 21st June 2000 and continues to be an inter-active experience for visitors who want to learn more about the role of assistive technology and interior design in the lives of people with dementia.

    There is a monthly OPEN DAY where visitors are given a guided tour of the house, have the technology fully explained and feedback their comments into the process. The tours are free to people with dementia and their carers and to voluntary sector organisations. To book a tour contact Housing 21 on 01285 659928 or e-mail gobeyvc@housing21.co.uk
    Developments in technology in the Gloucester Smart House

    The devices found around the Smart House, such as the Locator Box pictured here, continue to be developed and refined in response to the many comments received from visitors during the Open Days. Further information on these features can be found on the BIME website and from the Enable Project page on the Dementia Voice website.
     
  2. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Interior design tips

    From http://www.dementia-voice.org.uk/Projects/Projects_GloucesterProject.htm
    Sorry I couldnt cut and paste the photos but have a look at the website.

    The interior design or ‘low tech’ features

    We are about to update the colour schemes at the Gloucester Smart House, in line with latest understanding. The colours will still be bold, because we are told that as people age their memory of colour diminishes and pastels are often perceived as grey whereas reds, oranges and yellows stay fixed in the memory for longer. The textured wallpaper will remain on the walls to aid acoustics and add to the sensory feel of the rooms. We still avoid using patterned wallpapers that could be misinterpreted as having shapes, form or movement as some people with dementia can experience visual hallucinations.The picture of the lounge door illustrates the use of contrasting colours in the house and the continuation of the carpet to gently lead people into the room.
    In the living room, we have disguised a door using paint effects, which has proven useful in some care settings in re-directing people away from pathways not accessible to them. Similarly, some of the electric sockets are disguised and light switches highlighted by bright borders where easy identification is required.
    In the kitchen, we have highlighted the light switch by painting it a contrasting colour from the walls and removed cupboard doors so that someone who has difficulty with orientation will be able to see easily which cupboard they keep cups and saucers or tins of food in. On the cooker we have used an older type kettle rather than the newer cordless jug types, again to aid orientation as we have heard many stories of jug kettles being put on the cooker because that’s what people remember.
    In the bathroom we have decorated the walls in a strong contrasting colour so that the suite is easy to see against the background. We have used a picture of an old-fashioned toilet on the toliet door sign to act as a visual cue.
    If you have a tip on making the environment easier to use for people with dementia then please let us know.
     
  3. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Single operation Radio

    The idea was to develop a very easy to see and use radio.

    The tuning and volume controls are concealed in the battery compartment, giving the user one large switch to deal with when switching the radio on and off.

    see http://www.bath.ac.uk/bime/projects/single_opradio_proj.htm
    for photo.
     
  4. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Wander Reminder

    For photo see http://www.bath.ac.uk/bime/projects/wander_reminder.htm

    £35
    The BIME Wander reminder is a system to encourage time orientation for people with dementia by using verbal messages. It uses reliable and inexpensive technology that can be installed to suit the needs of individual situations.

    The BIME wander reminder is supplied in kit form and the kit includes

    a memo minder
    a mains adaptor
    a timer
    Our kit is supplied with fitting instructions

    The system is easy to install requiring no technical input. The verbal message is recorded and the minder is placed at the approach to the doorway. It can be left freestanding or hooked onto the wall. You can use batteries or plug the minder into the mains using the mains adaptor. The timer can be set to operate the minder only at key times eg. night time. Once the system is in position the infra red motion detector should be able to sense movement when the door is approached ; this will trigger a short familiar pre-recorded verbal message.

    PS The Radio in last post is £38
     
  5. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Dear Chris,

    I've had a look at the photos. The whole concept is incredibly clever and really well thought out. Thank you very much indeed.

    I'm going to utilise some of the ideas here at home - especially painting bright colours around the light switches.


    Best wishes,

    Jude
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Care Homes usimg state of the art ideas

    Hi Jude

    There are some care homes around that are trying out some of the ideas researchers are coming up with - as in my previous posts.

    If anyone knows of these ie examples fo research into practise - it would be great to hear about them on here.

    Visiting care homes when the need has not arisen may seem like an odd thing to suggest & maybe not a good idea after all - but if an emergency situation does arise it is good to know which are the better ones close to hand.

    Perhpas I'll start another thread on Resources - USEFUL IDEAS FOUND IN CARE HOMES or similar??? eg a robotic cat - its about £35 - and has an ON / OFF switch !!! For families who dont want a real one (can WELL understand that - we cant get new lounge furnityre or new carpets as one of scratches furniture & one digs holes in carpets - Burmese of course !!! one is almost silent & fairly vocak but she OK not like the Siamese 'sound' & Burmese are SO affectionate - & empathetic - there's a story there ... sound unbelieveable but true - dear Sophie comforted mME when HER brother was kiled by a car - ..... I digress . I'm not nuts really !!!!!!!)

    Sorry need to go now ... continue later. Chris
     
  7. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Dear Chris,

    Please do post as many ideas as you have on Resources. Also a good idea to drop a post on TP reminding Members to check the Resources section too. You'll notice I've done that for your last couple of posts, because all these ideas are really good things to know about.

    The robotic cat sounds pretty wild......! I could always rent out Ollie I suppose. He's has proved to be a huge hit here with my parents. I'm not so worried that he is going to trip them up now that they have got used to him being around, but am still keeping a wary eye.

    Best wishes,

    Jude
     
  8. Chris

    Chris Registered User

    May 20, 2003
    243
    Will do Jude. Maybe a lull from me for a little while as other things to attend to - but after the Dementia & Technology conference expect you'll be bombarded from me - Too much information you will say!!!

    Regards to all including Ollie.
     

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