Symptoms of dementia were caused by dehydration

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Worried Woman, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Worried Woman

    Worried Woman Registered User

    Jan 7, 2006
    26
    Dorset
    Some friends of mine have just told me that a couple of months ago they watched a TV programme concerning an elderly woman with symptoms of dementia. It turned out that she consumed very little liquid in her diet and this had caused the symptoms. A change of diet (addition of more fluids) relieved the symptoms.

    Did any one else see this programme?
     
  2. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hi, interesting post. Can't say I saw the program, but know that dehydration can cause confusion. I guess that several things could present moderate symptons, but surely cannot CAUSE dementia. Only my theory. Take care, Connie
     
  3. Worried Woman

    Worried Woman Registered User

    Jan 7, 2006
    26
    Dorset
    No, the dehydration did not CAUSE dementia, it caused similar symptoms.

    I just thought it may be of interest. Maybe it follows that dehydration can exacerbate the symptoms of dementia.
     
  4. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    Hi WW,
    I believe the programme was Doc Martin (Martin Clunes). I guess it shows that it is best to get a proper diagnosis before assuming the symptoms are definitely caused by dementia. Best wishes,
     
  5. Grandaughter 1

    Grandaughter 1 Registered User

    Jan 17, 2006
    141
    Hampshire
    We have trouble trying to get my Grandad to drink more. He refuse's point blank to drink water. He just has tea for brekkie and lunch.

    The thing is what can you do? You can't force them to drink water!!!
     
  6. My mother had symptoms VERY similar to those in dementia when in hospital - her's was related to medication.

    I've also seen it re: Urine Infection... confusion caused my alcohol misuse etc. etc.

    These things are therefore important to rule out... that's why on admission to hospital many tests are done - urine/bloods, etc. etc. in order to carry out a proper assessment.

    If you're interested (and can read this without nodding off lol) I wrote an essay for University on assessment that might explain what I'm on about:
    http://com5.runboard.com/balzheimers.finformation.t4

    Let me know if it's relevant.

    :)

    N.
     
  7. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    As regards getting someone (male) to drink more fluids, I am asking (because I don't know, therefore not recommending) how about beer? I know spirits are probably inadvisable, since strong alcohol dehydrates further, but if one can persuade the patient to drink water nicely flavoured with hops ...

    I suppose medications would be a limiting factor too. :confused: Perhaps you had best ignore me, I'm just thinking aloud really I suppose.

    Nevertheless, I would be interested to know the answer (re. beer as a remedy for dehydration when the patient won't willingly drink anything else)
     
  8. I wouldn't adivse alcohol...

    Any type of alcohol acts as a diuretic... doesn't matter weather it's beer or spirits.

    Maybe a 'sft drink shandy' would help if the person wants the 'taste' of beer.

    I learned this tackle at University... along the lines of:

    Pints vs. shorts... it ain't the quantity that matters... it's the alcohol content - whichever you chose, you WILL pee it away and end up with the after effects of dehydration, i.e. a hangover!

    And no Lynne... I WON'T ignore you... it's posts like these that I like... makes me think about what I've learned - and I can actually use that knowledge to good effect!!!

    :D

    Right - I'm off for a pint of Guinness and a BIG WEE - see yer all soon!

    :)

    N.
     
  9. cynron

    cynron Registered User

    Sep 26, 2005
    429
    east sussex
    Dehydration

    A lady i know who lives in a small house attached to others was heard by her neighbours one night smashing the place up and generaly causing a disturbance,she is in her 90ties but had not been known to act like this before.

    She was taken to hospital and was found to be dehydrated and has returned to her home where she continues to live alone and has been back to her normal self for a number of years.

    Cynron
     
  10. Shakey1961a

    Shakey1961a Registered User

    Nov 7, 2004
    111
    Southport
    #10 Shakey1961a, Jan 22, 2006
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2006
    It doesn't have to be plain water. What about fruit juice? Natural stuff or the stuff you dilute. I get Mum the 200ml cartons from Tesco that you pierce with a straw. 9 cartons (3 each of Orange, Apple and Pineapple) and they're about £2.

    If you do get dilute, get the normal one not the one with sweeteners in especially ASPARTAME. If you have to get diet stuff or stuff for diabetics at least try and get one with just Saccharin.

    Water is bad enough when you're well, at least make it interesting.

    Would a shandy be ok? One out of a can? At least it would have the taste of the beer and it's ok for kids to drink that stuff. Maybe a way round the taste problem and it's got the beer flavour so it may encourage him.

    Also while you're there, get them to sip on a drink with you. If they have a cup with you it's one more to be had than if you had not been there.

    Just some thoughts.
     
  11. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    Good suggestions Shakey, but I would add one cautionary note if the patient is a woman.
    Common complications are UTIs (urinary tract infections) and acidy fruit drinks can make these worse. Lots of sufferers (of UTIs) drink cranberry juice, which seems to have a preventive effect. If you can find one which is acceptable to the patient, this might be a helpful addition.
     

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