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Success with CHC funding for Dementia/Alzheimers?

feralcole

Registered User
Nov 18, 2020
15
0
Hi everyone, just wondering how many people here have actually had success in securing CHC funding for someone with advanced Alzheimer's?

If my Mum didn't have 24/7 care and people to essentially do absolutely everything for her, she would die - that seems pretty much a Primary Heathcare Need to me. She has other complications - Osetoporosis and Menieres Disease (constant vertigo), very bad mobility from a fractured hip - but nothing that means she needs an actual nurse looking after her. I have read that CHC is rarely awarded unless someone is on feeding tubes, need a nurse to look after them etc. We did apply at the start of the year and got turned down, but we did get awarded FNC should she move to a care home.

Would be interested to hear your feedback
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
76,049
0
Kent
I agree it's extremely difficult to get CHC. My husband was awarded it a week before he died and there wasn't even time to process it.
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
4,218
0
Midlands
My mother got it eventually.

She was registered blind, insulin dependant with Lewes dementia.Double incontinent Didnt qualify.

She was diagnosed with a heart condition.
Did she want the op? She said yes
I, as her POA aid no, inappropriate

The op was planned , much to my angst ( Had seen my father go through it, no was was it appropriate)
Morning of the Op, I recieved a phone call. Op was cancelled as Mum had basically collapsed died in the shower and recieved CPR!

Given that she was liable to collaspe gain at ny point, she was then awarded CHC funding,

She was long since capable of even making tea/washing herself/cooking etc BUT didnt need qualified nurses to do that - we'd paid carers for a long time, as well as half killing myself to keep her safe
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,190
0
High Peak
Hi everyone, just wondering how many people here have actually had success in securing CHC funding for someone with advanced Alzheimer's?

If my Mum didn't have 24/7 care and people to essentially do absolutely everything for her, she would die - that seems pretty much a Primary Heathcare Need to me. She has other complications - Osetoporosis and Menieres Disease (constant vertigo), very bad mobility from a fractured hip - but nothing that means she needs an actual nurse looking after her. I have read that CHC is rarely awarded unless someone is on feeding tubes, need a nurse to look after them etc. We did apply at the start of the year and got turned down, but we did get awarded FNC should she move to a care home.

Would be interested to hear your feedback
Unfortunately I think you've answered your own question when you say your mum doesn't need a nurse for her care.

There's a long-running thread here on TP about getting (or not getting) CHC - use the search box at the top of the page.

It's almost impossible to get and also depends somewhat on where you live. It seems the multi-disciplinary teams involved have a default position of 'no' and will tick boxes as they see fit. Also look out for huge errors on the assessment forms - this is very common so check everything.
 

Andy54

Registered User
Sep 24, 2020
162
0
My wife went into residential care around 7 months ago (she has Alzheimer's), initially partly funded by the local authority. Once she had moved in her social worker submitted a claim for CHC funding as she was confident that D met the criteria. This was based on lack of cognitive function, communication and some challenging behaviour. CHC funding was awarded a few weeks later. In some ways it all seemed too easy compared to what I have read of others experiences. Just dread the annual review now.
 

feralcole

Registered User
Nov 18, 2020
15
0
My wife went into residential care around 7 months ago (she has Alzheimer's), initially partly funded by the local authority. Once she had moved in her social worker submitted a claim for CHC funding as she was confident that D met the criteria. This was based on lack of cognitive function, communication and some challenging behaviour. CHC funding was awarded a few weeks later. In some ways it all seemed too easy compared to what I have read of others experiences. Just dread the annual review now.
That does indeed sound very easy! What sort of challenging behaviour were you dealing with, if you don't mind me asking?
 

Andy54

Registered User
Sep 24, 2020
162
0
@feralcole . Most of the challenging behaviour revolved around toileting and personal care, physically resisting clean up and washing assistance etc. Communication is almost impossible, D doesn't really take in what is said to her and when she tries to speak it is just a jumble of partly formed words which is impossible to understand.
 

feralcole

Registered User
Nov 18, 2020
15
0
@feralcole . Most of the challenging behaviour revolved around toileting and personal care, physically resisting clean up and washing assistance etc. Communication is almost impossible, D doesn't really take in what is said to her and when she tries to speak it is just a jumble of partly formed words which is impossible to understand.
thank you, yes my Mum's communication is like that, she doesn;t really understand what is said to her and her replies make very little sense. The challenging toilet stuff is just beginning for us...
 

Andy54

Registered User
Sep 24, 2020
162
0
I was fortunate I suppose in that I didn't have to play an active part in the CHC application process, it was all dealt with by social services which no doubt helped enormously. I'm not sure if this is an uncommon situation.
 

feralcole

Registered User
Nov 18, 2020
15
0
I was fortunate I suppose in that I didn't have to play an active part in the CHC application process, it was all dealt with by social services which no doubt helped enormously. I'm not sure if this is an uncommon situation.
omg yes, you seem very lucky...in our first assessment social services were awful, definitely weren't working for us, had very little knowledge of Mum, had never met her due to Covid so I literally did everything. i'm really happy to hear you had a smooth ride though - it's what should be the norm in these circumstances - as if things are difficult enough, the last thing that is needed is battles for CHC and battles with the lawyers from social services!
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
847
0
It’s interesting that Andy’s wife’s SW applied for CHC, presumably because a successful application would mean that the LA would no longer have to (partially) fund her care. I think that it’s normally a relative of the PWD who applies. I certainly don’t begrudge Andy’s wife getting CHC but I think that she was very fortunate as many other people with similar needs and behaviours are turned down.

I had pretty much discounted applying for my friend but as it’s her problems with her legs that are the main problem rather than her dementia I’m wondering whether she might qualify. I’m going to have to do some research.
 

Andy54

Registered User
Sep 24, 2020
162
0
It’s interesting that Andy’s wife’s SW applied for CHC, presumably because a successful application would mean that the LA would no longer have to (partially) fund her care. I think that it’s normally a relative of the PWD who applies. I certainly don’t begrudge Andy’s wife getting CHC but I think that she was very fortunate as many other people with similar needs and behaviours are turned down.

I had pretty much discounted applying for my friend but as it’s her problems with her legs that are the main problem rather than her dementia I’m wondering whether she might qualify. I’m going to have to do some research.
Yes I think that you are right, I can't help feeling that the Local Authority had this plan in mind before they agreed to the placement If we had been self funding it would have been a very different story. Left to my own devices I don't think I would have considered the possibility of CHC funding.
 

Frank24

Registered User
Feb 13, 2018
345
0
My Mum is currently in receipt of CHC funding, and as with Andy's experience I feel like it was too "easy" a process. Due to Covid I think the process was different, I wasn't required to attend any meetings and the social worker just spoken to me on the phone. She told me that she considered my mum was "borderline" and asked me some questions which I gave wholly truthful answers to. At the end of the conversation she said she would take it her superiors and see if it should go to panel. My mums situation is like all of us on here - really sad and hard. She can't communicate, move, do anything at all for herself and needs input with everything. Going through the DST tool is really helpful as it really focuses on exactly what the criteria is. Its also a fairly depressing state of affairs seeing what your LO can't do for themselves anymore. My mum needs nursing care as she has been awarded FNC. I only found out that mu Mum had been awarded CHC when I called Social services to take the over the payment of care home fees once the house had been sold and I was shocked to be told she was now CHC funded and two weeks later I got a letter confirming this. I am confused about the review process, as I understand its reviewed after three months and then annually but that time has gone by and I haven't heard anything. I understand that there is a backlog due to Covid so have wondered if that is the hold up and why I haven't heard anything.
The whole process seems really confusing. The social worker I spoke to on the phone did mention totally in passing that my mum isn't compliant with her care. I have no idea what she meant by this as my Mum is not aggressive (as far as I can see) and is fairly easy going. When I had asked nursing staff how my Mum coped with being in a hoist was she frightened for example they replied that she was at first and they reassured her. I'm not sure how much I can actually cope with hearing about my Mum suffering so I haven't pushed for more information. I'm just trying to take each day as it comes until I know the outcome and timing of this review. I spoke with a social worker from another department who told me that it was unlikely that they would take it away from my Mum at this stage. But really who knows! Im not sure if any of this is helpful but just my experience. My mum funded 24 7 care of home for x 2 years (expensive and stressful for me!) with the help of a family loan against her property. My mum would have been a self funder.
The social worker who I spoke to initially did make a comment that if she thought anyone was eligible for funding she get it and they considered everything fairly but have read so many negative experiences about the whole process I've found this the only "easy" part of anything to do with my Mums care and situation over the years. Haven't said that I don't't fully understand the process.
 

Andy54

Registered User
Sep 24, 2020
162
0
I was told at the original assessment meeting that the 3 month review (it was actually nearer to six months when this actually happened) was not a formal full review but simply a check that no significant change had occurred and that I would not be invited or notified of this. However I was contacted by the nurse from the health authority who did this review who basically asked if I was happy or had any concerns with D's care. The nurse visited the home and had a discussion with the home's manager. I understand that the 12 month review is essentially the same process as the original application assessment.
 

Frank24

Registered User
Feb 13, 2018
345
0
I was told at the original assessment meeting that the 3 month review (it was actually nearer to six months when this actually happened) was not a formal full review but simply a check that no significant change had occurred and that I would not be invited or notified of this. However I was contacted by the nurse from the health authority who did this review who basically asked if I was happy or had any concerns with D's care. The nurse visited the home and had a discussion with the home's manager. I understand that the 12 month review is essentially the same process as the original application assessment.
oh Andy that is useful to know thank you.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
14,970
0
England
I was told at the original assessment meeting that the 3 month review (it was actually nearer to six months when this actually happened) was not a formal full review but simply a check that no significant change had occurred and that I would not be invited or notified of this. However I was contacted by the nurse from the health authority who did this review who basically asked if I was happy or had any concerns with D's care. The nurse visited the home and had a discussion with the home's manager. I understand that the 12 month review is essentially the same process as the original application assessment.

My husband was awarded CHC with no problems at all. He went into a nursing home with the funding with 24 hour 1:1 care. The 1”1 care was reducuded to 12 hours a day after a couple of years when he slept better and was less mobile. He had CHC for the whole of his 4 years in the nursing home.

I was not aware of the 3 month check though it was recorded in his notes. I was invited to and attended the 4 yearly checks he had. They went through each category with Manager and myself contributing. Only his mobility was ever marked down.

After three crises at home he went into an assessment unit. After 2 weeks there we were told he could never return home and at 4 weeks they asked us to a meeting where he was discussed by several professionals now involved with him. It was from this in depth 2 hour meeting that it was decided that they would put an application forward.

My husband was 7 years at home with me as his carer and 4 in the nursing home.
 

feralcole

Registered User
Nov 18, 2020
15
0
Thanks everyone...it really does seen like a postcode lottery...my mum is in Bedfordshire...where are you guys located?
 

Frank24

Registered User
Feb 13, 2018
345
0
Sorry I don't feel comfortable about disclosing a location just in case family members are reading X
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,427
0
South coast
Anyone who is looking at CHC would be well advised to read the government decision support tool. This is a long document, but it outlines what is needed to qualify, the different domains that must be considered and how to score them.


It is very difficult for people with dementia to qualify because most of the problems associated with dementia (mobility problems, incontinence, needing help with washing, dressing, feeding, disorientation, processing problems etc) are considered social problems rather than health problems and do not score high enough.
 

BlondieH

New member
Dec 30, 2021
3
0
My dad is due for his CHC assessment appointment next week and the more I read the more complicated it seems. Has anyone any experience of using a solicitor to assist them?
 
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