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Secure nursing home recommendations

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Julie2016, Mar 23, 2017.

  1. Julie2016

    Julie2016 Registered User

    May 17, 2016
    4
    Hello - I'm looking for recommendations for a secure nursing home for my mother. She is currently in the West Midlands area and is having to leave the second home in 5 weeks. We tried her in a care home for a trial, which we then tried to make permanent. But she kept trying to escape. So we had to move her to a more secure nursing home where again she keeps trying to leave. So we now need to find her somewhere else that can cope with challenging behaviour (mainly that she keeps trying to leave). She can memorise the numbers for key pads for secure doors so it will have to be very secure. Ideally it will be in the West Midlands area but ideas of good homes further afield would be welcomed. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    #2 Jessbow, Mar 23, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
    Who is telling her the number of the security doors? Absurd!

    Make it known to the home and let them change the codes.

    Most homes, especial ffor those with dementia residents should be able to manage that.

    Keep moving her will unsettle her even more. Does the home say they cant cope or do you think they can't?
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,042
    Male
    North Manchester
    "Who is telling her the number of the security doors? Absurd!"

    I assumed careless staff or visitors were not using a hand to obscure the numbers being pressed.

    You can get keypads where the keys are on top of the unit with a small lip in front, they don't look as nice and are more awkward to operate but they are good for hiding the key presses.
     
  4. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,522
    Ireland
    The nursing home where my husband was was a mixed home- a lot of the residents had dementia to some extent or other, but not all. However, the security codes on the doors were changed very regularly, and strictly staff only knew the codes. Even the regular volunteer workers, who helped the activities coordinator and the maintenance man, didn't have the codes, nor the hairdresser or chiropodist that went in every week. All visitors, even those of us going in every day had to be let in and out by a staff member, AND had to sign/time in and out too. And with all those precautions, they still (with my permission) tagged my husband as he walked all over the home and would try any door he came to.

    Sent from my Moto G Play using Talking Point mobile app
     
  5. Callandergirl

    Callandergirl Registered User

    Apr 23, 2013
    96
    My husband who has fronto temporal dementia and has managed to get out of the building 3 times has been given 28 days notice to find a new home less than 24 hours after a review meeting at which a change in the timing of his meds was suggested with a follow-up meeting in 2 weeks. I've been told by the someone who knows their stuff, that all care homes who take dementia patients should be able to be fully secure. If they are not it's because they choose not to for usually financial reasons. The staff and the environment should be fit for purpose. It might be worth contacting the care commission.
     
  6. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,783
    Salford
  7. Julie2016

    Julie2016 Registered User

    May 17, 2016
    4
    Thanks for all the comments. Mum has been standing by the keypads and watching the staff put the codes in so even when they change the code she will learn the new one. She has also been disruptive in other ways as well. The home she's in is one that's classed as being able to deal with challenging behaviour but they say she's an unusual case as she can learn new things. Any more ideas would be welcomed.
     

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