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saving limits and care at home

wilko73

Registered User
Feb 8, 2021
76
0
if you have care at home there are 2 different thresholds for LA help towards care fees,I think these are hitting £22,250 and £14,250 at £22,250 I believe the LA pay a certain amount of the care and when you hit the lower limit it sounds as if the LA pay for the care.,at least that's probably what a lot of people think.i hear people saying that most of your pension is still taken though.
So i ask is their really much difference in the level of financial contribution between those 2 thresholds or do you still have to spend most of what is coming in even when you hot the lower limit?
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
23,667
0
North Manchester
Capital between £14,250 and £23,250 is assessed as if you have an assumed (tariff) income.
For every £250 or part of £250 above £14,250, you are treated as if you have an extra £1 a week income.
 

wilko73

Registered User
Feb 8, 2021
76
0
Capital between £14,250 and £23,250 is assessed as if you have an assumed (tariff) income.
For every £250 or part of £250 above £14,250, you are treated as if you have an extra £1 a week income.
Hi thanks,so if you get down to £14,250 and say you had £1,000 coming in each month so you would have a tariff of an extra £4 a week income i don't understand how that works so are they taking all of the money but letting you keep £4 a week for the month so £16 over 4 weeks that you can keep?
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
14,454
0
England
Simply if you fall below and stay below the lower limit then your state pension and any private pension has to go towards the cost of care. You are allowed to keep approx £25 per week of your pension/s for personal needs. If you have a partner who remains in the home then they can claim half of any personal pension. The LA then top up the pensions to the limit they pay for someone’s care. Sadly no care is completely free. In some cases a top up fee is required if the LA contribution plus pensions does not cover the care home tariff. This can only be paid for by a third party.
 

wilko73

Registered User
Feb 8, 2021
76
0

Simply if you fall below and stay below the lower limit then your state pension and any private pension has to go towards the cost of care. You are allowed to keep approx £25 per week of your pension/s for personal needs. If you have a partner who remains in the home then they can claim half of any personal pension. The LA then top up the pensions to the limit they pay for someone’s care. Sadly no care is completely free. In some cases a top up fee is required if the LA contribution plus pensions does not cover the care home tariff. This can only be paid for by a third party.
Hi thanks my mum has social care at home,the £25 that they leave you with would hardly cover food,that's amazing.She will still have utillity bills to pay etc,how does she pay them
 

Banjomansmate

Registered User
Jan 13, 2019
3,173
0
Dorset
The LA will take into account your Mum’s regular outgoings like rent, electricity, insurance, phone etc. when they do the financial assessment and allow so much for food etc. She can still claim Attendance Allowance.
 

Female1952

Registered User
Apr 6, 2021
33
0
Simply if you fall below and stay below the lower limit then your state pension and any private pension has to go towards the cost of care. You are allowed to keep approx £25 per week of your pension/s for personal needs. If you have a partner who remains in the home then they can claim half of any personal pension. The LA then top up the pensions to the limit they pay for someone’s care. Sadly no care is completely free. In some cases a top up fee is required if the LA contribution plus pensions does not cover the care home tariff. This can only be paid for by a third party.
That's if the PWD is in a care home. They can't live at home on £25 per week.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
14,454
0
England
The £25 per week is for the person in the care home to cover weekly expenses. so If the LA are funding then they will bill you for pensions less the £25. The wife/husband left in the marital home can claim half of any private pension.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
16,138
0
South coast
Hi @wilko73
I think your talk in your original post of the LA taking your pension has confused people as this is what happens when you move into a care home, but not when you are still living at home.
When someone moves into a care home the financial situation is as @jaymor has described, but when they are still at home there is a different system The two threshold of £23,500 and £14,000 still exists, but the LA does not take the pensions and Attendance Allowance (and other benefits) continue. SS agree a level of care, but if you are over the upper threshold you can either get SS to source the care and then repay SS the full amount, or you can just arrange it yourself (you can even arrange more than SS would do)

If you are under the lower threshold then SS will look at your income and if that is low too then they will pay the full amount of the care that they have agreed. If your income is high then you would be expected to pay at least some of it from your income. The finance department has lots of different allowances for different things, so they will calculate what your total allowance is for your circumstances. I dont know the details, but can say that the man from the financial department spotted that I had bought kylie sheets and said that incontinence gave extra allowance for incontinence products, washing and extra bedding. It seemed reasonably fair.

Between the two thresholds there is a sort of sliding scale and you are expected to use some of your savings to pay towards the care. As the saving go down, the amount you are asked to pay reduces.

I would also like to add that it is, of course, only the person with dementias income and savings that are considered. They dont look at the income of the spouse.
 

wilko73

Registered User
Feb 8, 2021
76
0
Hi @wilko73
I think your talk in your original post of the LA taking your pension has confused people as this is what happens when you move into a care home, but not when you are still living at home.
When someone moves into a care home the financial situation is as @jaymor has described, but when they are still at home there is a different system The two threshold of £23,500 and £14,000 still exists, but the LA does not take the pensions and Attendance Allowance (and other benefits) continue. SS agree a level of care, but if you are over the upper threshold you can either get SS to source the care and then repay SS the full amount, or you can just arrange it yourself (you can even arrange more than SS would do)

If you are under the lower threshold then SS will look at your income and if that is low too then they will pay the full amount of the care that they have agreed. If your income is high then you would be expected to pay at least some of it from your income. The finance department has lots of different allowances for different things, so they will calculate what your total allowance is for your circumstances. I dont know the details, but can say that the man from the financial department spotted that I had bought kylie sheets and said that incontinence gave extra allowance for incontinence products, washing and extra bedding. It seemed reasonably fair.

Between the two thresholds there is a sort of sliding scale and you are expected to use some of your savings to pay towards the care. As the saving go down, the amount you are asked to pay reduces.

I would also like to add that it is, of course, only the person with dementias income and savings that are considered. They dont look at the income of the spouse

Hi @canary thanks for your time,mum does have kylies and dry wipes that aren't all that cheap so that helps,thanks.
Mum's over the upper limit at the moment but I like to look forward and be a little informed of what to expect I hope I haven't got to fill in too many forms when the time arrives
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
23,667
0
North Manchester
mum does have kylies and dry wipes that aren't all that cheap
The supply of continence products by the NHS is not means tested.

To qualify for free incontinence products provided by the NHS, you’ll need to meet criteria set out by your local NHS.

Contact your local NHS continence service or clinic for a location in your area and check if you need to be referred by your doctor.

A specialist nurse may need to assess if you are eligible and will then arrange your supply of products.
https://www.ageuk.org.uk/information-advice/health-wellbeing/conditions-illnesses/incontinence/ .
 

wilko73

Registered User
Feb 8, 2021
76
0
The supply of continence products by the NHS is not means tested.

To qualify for free incontinence products provided by the NHS, you’ll need to meet criteria set out by your local NHS.

Contact your local NHS continence service or clinic for a location in your area and check if you need to be referred by your doctor.


A specialist nurse may need to assess if you are eligible and will then arrange your supply of products.
https://www.ageuk.org.uk/information-advice/health-wellbeing/conditions-illnesses/incontinence/ .
Thank you
 

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