1. cjack0151

    cjack0151 New member

    Feb 8, 2019
    2
    Hi,
    I am looking for recommendations for a simple to read calendar, preferably with the abity to upload own pictures and can be programmed remotely with reminders. Does such a thing exist please?
    Thank you.
     
  2. karaokePete

    karaokePete Registered User

    Jul 23, 2017
    5,022
    N Ireland
    Hello @cjack0151, welcome to TP.

    I'm not aware of an item like the one you mention but just wanted to welcome you and advise you to use caution with such items. I think my wife is like many people with dementia in that initially I surrounded her with special clocks, calendars, watches etc., and it was a complete waste of time as they were ignored.

    Others who have had more success may be along later with a specific answer for you.

    In the meantime it may be worth checking the Alzheimer's Society shop which you can locate after clicking the blue button on the top right of the page as they have several clocks etc.
     
  3. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,863
    Female
  4. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    1,053
    My mother-in-law had a clock telling her the days ,but as others have said, eventually she stopped looking at it. There was simply no initiative to remember to look at it in the first place. She was given a radio with simple instructions, but it got ignored and she never even thought about putting it on . It is sadly all part and parcel of the illness
     
  5. cjack0151

    cjack0151 New member

    Feb 8, 2019
    2
    Thank you for your advice which I will take on board and your warm welcome. My dad has been successfully masking his symptoms for a while I believe. He has become less able to do this and a whole host of things have come to light since he came out of hospital following a fall. I live 600 miles away and he refuses to move in with me or even near me, so I am currently on 2 hourly phone calls to keep a check which is exhausting as he is profoundly deaf. Hence my query. My dad still has a fare amount of clarity from time to time and is refusing all social care and other supports. Just getting my head around how best to keep him safe. A referral to the dementia clinic is in progress but they can't tell me when he might get an appointment yet.
    Thanks again. Will maybe hold off on the gadgetry a while until I have explored further.
     
  6. karaokePete

    karaokePete Registered User

    Jul 23, 2017
    5,022
    N Ireland
    Do take a good look around the site @cjack0151 as it is a goldmine for information. When I first joined I read old threads for information but then found the AS Publications list and the page where a post code search can be done to check for support services in a persons own area. If you are interested in these, clicking the following links will take you there

    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/publications-factsheets-full-list

    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/find-support-near-you

    You will see that there are Factsheets that will help with things like getting care needs assessments, deciding the level of care required and sorting out useful things like Wills, Power of Attorney etc.

    I know that we have a few members who care from a distance so you may get more replies that will greatly benefit you and your dad later. I certainly hope so.

    Now that you have found us I hope you will keep posting as the membership has vast collective knowledge and experience.
     
  7. Sarasa

    Sarasa Registered User

    Apr 13, 2018
    611
    There was this discussion recently https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/threads/experience-of-using-myhomehelper.109126/page-2#post-1608982, that might be the sort of thing that you are considering. I've just bought my mother a very simple talking clock. Press the button once and it tells you the time, twice and it tells you the day and date. My mother is partially sighted so anything that showed pictures etc would be pointless. She loved it when I gave it to her. It will be interesting to see when I visit tomorrow if she's still that keen a week later.
    Have you had any involvement from social services as to what your father's need's are? That might be a starting point. Tricky if he thinks he's perfectly fine and won't let people in though.
    I'm deaf so I can imagine the phone calls can be hard. I try to avoid phones when possible. Is something like skype a possibility for calls?
     
  8. Chrissie B

    Chrissie B Registered User

    Jan 15, 2019
    71
    Female
    North Yorkshire
    I don't know about a remote calendar, I tried all sorts of ideas with my mum, but she has the added problem of not being able to hear without hearing aids.
    Having said that, I use an Amazon Alexa upstairs for me, and a Google Home downstairs at my house.. Mine are the old fashioned sorts, which are just for hearing, but I do believe the newer Amazon Alexa has a screen which would do what you want, only the price is ridiculously high, and as everyone points out, there has to be a certain amount of someone not forgetting to look, so it does depend largely on which stage your patient is at. The Amazon echo is annoying because it sometimes fails to understand the shut up command, but perhaps the newer version has improved, but the Google home might be worth a try, and if it doesn't work, you can always take it for yourself. Makes a great alarm clock, and you can set it to speak out reminders at certain times of the day. The Google Home mini is every bit as good as the full one and a lot cheaper.
    Avoid the calendars aimed at people with dementia problems if you do want to go down that road. The amount of time it is good for doesn't justify the cost of them. If you are tempted to get one, look for a second-hand tablet, set it up to stay on all the time and leave it plugged in. At least you'll get an idea if it's worthwhile spending money out to get something visual.
     
  9. Sarasa

    Sarasa Registered User

    Apr 13, 2018
    611
    As I thought the talking clock has now been hidden, or broken or lost, not sure which. Mum says that she doesn't want to be treated like a child which is what she thought the clock did. I tried to explain it was just an aid to help with her poor eyesight, the same way that I have various things to help me with my very poor hearing. I don't think she understood that.
    What made me laugh was her telling me if I did want to give her a present she'd prefer perfume. OK hint taken.
     
  10. Shm123

    Shm123 Registered User

    May 2, 2018
    11
    Female
    Hi - I have been using MyHomeHelper for Mum since February . It is great. I can manage the calendar remotely and also video call her without her needing to touch anything to answer it. It does also have the ability show photos (and add captions to them) but Mum prefers the photos printed out in a folder. It also has the ability to show up reminders - with one of your own images if you wish e.g. I put some up to remind Mum to take her tablets and included a photo of hew own blister packs. You can add response options if the person is likely to use them e.g. Have you taken your tablets? with your own response choices e.g. Yes, No or Can't remember. You can then get emails showing if the response is given and what it is or if no response has been given. I have tried this but am not using this on a regular basis.

    If you would like more information please let me know. Its a great device!
     
  11. TNJJ

    TNJJ Registered User

    May 7, 2019
    774
    Female
    cornwall
    I’m assuming you need broadband?
     
  12. Dimpsy

    Dimpsy Registered User

    Sep 2, 2019
    563
    Female
    Before she moved in with us, my mum was living 150 miles away on her own, isolated and very lonely. Mum is profoundly deaf,since childhood and wasn't able to use the phone.
    The only way I could stay in touch - apart from the monthly visit, was by writing. I wrote religiously every week and included photos, a magazine (even the Tesco magazine was a treat for mum who was not allowed to go out by a family member!).
    The letters were just catch-up's about what we had been up to, what was growing in the garden, what we were having for dinner, boring stuff, but it was a window into everyday normality at a time when mum was very low, and she could re-read the letters as often as she pleased.
    Letters are also a way to make suggestions, the ideas can be processed gradually in their own time and because they can be referred back to may strike a chord. Phone conversations can be easily forgotten.

    Mum has one of those time/day/date clocks that you can set remindes for. Total waste of money, she has AZ, so forgets to look at the clock.
     
  13. Shm123

    Shm123 Registered User

    May 2, 2018
    11
    Female
    Hi
    I have put Broadband into Mum's, but you can also run the MyHomeHelper off a data SIM if you don't want to put broadband in. I was quite pleased that adding Broadband to Mum's existing BT package (which is a very basic calls package) only added about £2 per month, and the router was free (except postage) so a good result really. I have also put in some IP cameras to keep an eye on her so they also use the broadband.

    Let me know if you want more info
     
  14. Al-4

    Al-4 Registered User

    Dec 30, 2016
    21
    I was the member in my family who went in for the use of gadgets. Would just like to quickly say that the previous answers with regards to items just being ignored is probably what my experience was but I think trial and error approach has to be taken as each individual case could be different. You don't have to spend a fortune on gadgets as technology (android /ios) gives you the ability to set up things like one touch radio /phone calling. Be careful with the one touch phone calling as you can end up getting calls at all times day and night, I must add that I never considered my mum a burden to me but being wakened at awkward hours could some times be stressful. If you require information on handy apps I would be happy to supply. With regards to your own peace of mind here's a link to a monitoring service which my council worked in partnership with. I think it cost £7 a month but you can check it out with your local social department. Here is the link https://justchecking.co.uk
    They were also having trials of putting gps trackers in clients shoes/slippers in case of wandering.
     

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