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Reflection

Reflection

Registered User
Feb 25, 2015
10
Mum was diagnosed with AD in July. Have since applied for AA forms but don't know if she qualifies to receive any yet. She functions normally with household chores and cooking. Its the financial, phone calls, shopping, time and dates that confuse her. I see her everyday.
 

Katrine

Registered User
Jan 20, 2011
2,839
England
It's usually recommended that you get help in filling in the AA form so that you highlight areas of dependence on others to maintain independent living. Perhaps an advisor from AgeUK or Alzheimer's Society, or CAB, or a friend who's got experience.

You could start with the Bristol Activities of Daily Living checklist: http://www.health.fgov.be/internet2...acutecare/documents/ie2divers/19073273_nl.pdf

From what you say, your mum needs you to 'attend' to help with a number of aspects of Daily Living. Remember that the situation is progressive. Think about how she coped a year ago, 6 months ago, etc. and see which areas are obviously deteriorating. You may need to gild the lily a bit on the form.

For example, if there have been occasions where she forgets appointments, or leaves meals to fester in the fridge, or wears the same clothes for several days, you would note on the form that she does this regularly or usually, even if at the moment these have been occasional lapses.

There is a useful maxim "a managed need is still a need." What happens, or would happen, if you don't go and see her daily? If she is like my MIL was when I was doing daily care visits, things will unravel quite fast without your intervention. This is why she should qualify for lower level AA which concerns daytime support.
 
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canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
12,189
South coast
When I filled in the AA form the man from DWP said that I should fill it in according to what she is like on her worst day and to assume that a different person will read every question ie - dont worry about repeating yourself.
He also said to make sure that that you fill in the boxes at the bottom with examples as if you dont, that question will be ignored.

I would recommend that you take a photocopy of the blank form and fill it in in pencil to make sure that you have included everything before you fill in the actual form.

CAB and AgeUK can help you fill it if you are finding it tough going and they also know the buzz words to use.

BTW - are you a DWP appointee? Its easy to do and means that you can talk to DWP on your mums behalf.
 

Reflection

Registered User
Feb 25, 2015
10
Reflections

When I filled in the AA form the man from DWP said that I should fill it in according to what she is like on her worst day and to assume that a different person will read every question ie - dont worry about repeating yourself.
He also said to make sure that that you fill in the boxes at the bottom with examples as if you dont, that question will be ignored.

I would recommend that you take a photocopy of the blank form and fill it in in pencil to make sure that you have included everything before you fill in the actual form.

CAB and AgeUK can help you fill it if you are finding it tough going and they also know the buzz words to use.

BTW - are you a DWP appointee? Its easy to do and means that you can talk to DWP on your mums behalf.
Thank you for your help. Will go and get the Age UK to help fill in the form.
 

DMac

Registered User
Jul 18, 2015
535
Surrey, UK
I was lucky to have help from a Dementia Navigator from my local Alz Society. I really could not have completed the form without her help. My mum-in-law now gets AA at the full rate.

Also, if you are unable to work because of your caring commitments, you may be entitled to Carer's allowance. The allowance itself is not huge, but it does ensure your NI contributions are kept up. Good luck with it.
 

Pickles53

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
2,474
Radcliffe on Trent
Mum was diagnosed with AD in July. Have since applied for AA forms but don't know if she qualifies to receive any yet. She functions normally with household chores and cooking. Its the financial, phone calls, shopping, time and dates that confuse her. I see her everyday.
This is how my mum's difficulties began and she got AA at the lower rate. I did the forms myself, but I would certainly agree that it's easier if you can get someone with experience of these forms to help you. You need to think 'what would happen if nobody was available to help in this situation?' For example, because of time and date confusion, my mum turned up at her church for a funeral in January two hours before it started and would have frozen standing outside if a caretaker hadn't turned up early.