Power of Attorney (amongst other things - the list seems endless) - please help.

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by dustyanswer, Jul 15, 2015.

  1. dustyanswer

    dustyanswer Registered User

    Jun 23, 2015
    12
    Has anyone out there had to do this recently? I'm in the process of registering POA and have now taken control of post, possession of bank accounts, medical appointments, legal docs etc. I live 40 minutes away from my Dad and would really appreciate any tips for managing this little lot from a distance. I am currently over there twice a week because of work commitments, but I really want to be there more.

    I'm finding the whole thing overwhelming, as I'm wracked with guilt for not doing more but at the same time am daunted by what I already have to do (selfish I know).

    All the documents I've read about being a carer in employment have said that work can refuse part time hours (for a myriad reasons - and my job really would go out of its way to refuse)), and I want to reduce mine further so I can be with Dad more often. Has anyone been through this?

    Also, does anyone know if carer's allowance is means tested/ how I would go about applying etc.

    It's not often I find myself out of my depth, but I really am, and would appreciate any advice whatsoever.

    Please help!!
     
  2. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    Hi Dusty,

    Just want to say welcome. You are in the right place to get help. Don't worry. People on here will happily tell you all you need to know and be very supportive, so take a few deep breaths and try to relax a bit.

    About the LPAs, I haven't had to use mine yet, thankfully, but the other members on here will be able to explain about that, and give you info about being a carer in employment.

    Just wanted to say hi and try not to stress. Good luck,

    LS
     
  3. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    PS "Daunted and wracked with guilt" pretty much describes half the people on here, myself included. You are not alone!

    LS
     
  4. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    I'm afraid that carer's allowance is means tested. https://www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/overview

    Is your father getting everything he is entitled to? The most obvious being attendance allowance and the council tax disregard for severe mental impairment?
     
  5. dustyanswer

    dustyanswer Registered User

    Jun 23, 2015
    12
    I don't know what he's entitled to. I've just found the factsheet and am about to plough through.

    Contacted DWP who are sending out a form and assured me Attendance Allowance wasn't means tested because of his age.

    Didn't know about Council Tax - so thanks for that tip. I will investigate.
     
  6. dustyanswer

    dustyanswer Registered User

    Jun 23, 2015
    12
    Thank you!

    Thank you for that. I appreciate any support at all. :)

    I'm getting a pack for Attendance Allowance sent out, which Donna at DWP assures me is not means tested because Dad is 77. We shall see.

    I've had a top tip about Council Tax, which I didn't even know about.

    Is there anything else I should be considering, do you know?
     
  7. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    I just read through that, Jennifer, because I also need to find out if mum can claim CA. Holy ****! What a lot to take in! From reading it my overall impression is that even if you manage to get CA you'll only lose the same amount of money from another benefit/pension/etc., so for most people there is no point applying. Is that really the case?

    LS
     
  8. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Well basically you're correct if we are talking about another state benefit or state pension. There can be advantages to applying, even if you don't actually get cash out of it because it's called an "underlying entitlement" which might mean you get more from other benefits. And the primary advantage to a working age person is that you get credited with NI.

    However you can get carer's allowance if you are receiving just an occupational pension.
     
  9. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Dustyanswer: when you get the AA forms (and DWP is correct, AA is neither means tested nor taxable) you need to fill them out very thoroughly with the worse days and nights in mind, not just the best. Also, just because a person can do something (dress for example) if it takes them hours or if in the end they are dressed inappropriately (for the temperature, for example, or their underwear is over their outer clothes) that's something that should be documented. Basically, if they have a need, even if that need isn't currently being met, it still means they have a need. The paper forms have a page for sort of free form answers: I attached 4 or 5 pages more of supplementary information and got upper rate AA for my mother first go. In other words, you can't be too thorough.
     
  10. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,499
    Female
    London
    #10 Beate, Jul 15, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
    Attendance Allowance is well worth applying for as its not means-tested. Carers Allowance is means-tested insofar as you are not allowed to earn more than £110 per week.

    You have the right to ask your employer for flexible working hours and they have the right to say no. They do have to have a good reason but I guess most employers could cite business or financial reasons to refuse you.

    How about you contact a charity like Age UK, Alzheimer's Society or the Carers Centre? They are pretty good in sussing out what benefits are available and can help fill in the forms.
     
  11. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,287
    Cotswolds
    Council tax exemption on grounds of severe mental impairment is indeed a top tip! You can only apply though once your father has Attendance Allowance, and then the GP usually has to confirm the impairment ( local authorities do vary in their methods, though!)

    Re Attendance Allowance, it definitely is not means tested. Just a word of caution though: fill the form in very carefully, on grounds of his needs, not what help he gets, otherwise he may be refused. And you don't want to have to appeal...... It may be useful to seek advice from AgeUK, CAB or Alz Soc. In many areas they have a visiting service largely for the purpose of helping people complete the forms.

    Good luck :)

    Lindy xx
     
  12. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,397
    Female
    South coast
    Re Carers Allowance if you are working and earn just over the limit - if you pay into a private pension 50% of this is considered an allowance and disregarded.
    So, If you earn £114 (which would take you over the limit) you can pay £9 into a private pension and bingo, it takes you down to £109.50 and you get your Carers Allowance. Of course, you also have to pay the rest of the £9, so you actually get £105, but its much better than nothing.

    Also, if you have irregular earnings you can ask to be assessed over a month or even 3 months at a time, but you will get your CA monthly or 3 monthly too.
     
  13. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    My mum is 74, not working and on a pension of less than 70 quid, so I guess she might well be eligible for the CA. I'll look into the council tax thing too as dad gets AL.

    Thanks for the information everyone. It's all so helpful! Hope things are getting easier for you with all this info too, Dusty.

    LS
     
  14. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,397
    Female
    South coast
    Im afraid that you are only eligible for CA if you are of working age. Once you are of state pension age you cant claim it, though you can have a private/occupational pension if you took early retirement.
    Sorry
     
  15. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    Ah well, that means I don't have to worry about filling in THAT form anyway. Thanks for that info, Canary. That's saved me wasting a lot of time. :)

    LS
     
  16. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Actually that's not true.

    However, in Long Sufferings mother's case, since she gets a state pension of <£70 she wouldn't get it (because you get whatever is higher, pension or CA). However, she would be entitled to the "underlying entitlement" which might mean she was entitled to the carer's premium of GC.

    There's a description of this here http://www.tameside.gov.uk/carers/allowance
     
  17. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,397
    Female
    South coast
    Well you learn something new every day. Thank you for that jennifer :)
     
  18. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    Thanks Jennifer and Canary.

    God, it's all so bloody complicated, isn't it? No wonder my mum can't be bothered with it all - I'm starting to feel that way myself!

    LS
     
  19. Miss shiraz

    Miss shiraz Registered User

    Dec 24, 2014
    82
    Midlands
    #19 Miss shiraz, Jul 15, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
    Things to consider that have helped us with MIL -
    - getting post re-directed to you or get address changed with the bank etc
    - get Dad a diary to write reminders and appointments in, things to ask you. Encourage others to write in it if this hrlps. We can see who has visited and its also a good reminder for her. Sometimes goes wrong when she doesn't know what day of the week it is
    - we told as many of her friends and neighbours about her dementia so they can look out for her and try to understand her behaviours,
    Registering the POA with banks etc whilst it takes time, makes life easier when you need to access info.. prioritise what needs to be done first. We actually reviewed her finances putting savings in all one place (less companies to deal with!)
    - she has a cleaner and gardener each week, its someone else to keep an eye out and wd pay them direct
    - key safe on side of house with front door key. Various people have the code including doctors. Doc also has the PoA registered.
    The list does seem endless but you'll get there... get the most used and important stuff done first, even making a list just helps as it gets it out of your head onto paper.

    in terms of part time work, the law changed earlier this year and employers need good grounds to decline. I don't know the full details but worth researching before approaching your employer.

    good luck... keep asking questions as the folk on here have lots of experience to share
     
  20. dustyanswer

    dustyanswer Registered User

    Jun 23, 2015
    12
    Getting to grips (or not)

    Jennifer

    Thank you. I will be more thorough than I've been already. It's a little unclear about whether I can fill it in for him or not.

    There is a confusing section which reads: "If you do want this statement to be filled in, the best person to do it is the one who is most involved with your treatment or care. This may be someone you have already told us about on this form.

    If you are signing this form on behalf of the disabled person, please get someone else to fill in this section."

    Does this mean I need to ask my husband to fill that in, as I'm not allowed to? Imagine if Dad had to do this on his own!!!
     

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