1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. dottyd

    dottyd Registered User

    Jan 22, 2011
    1,066
    n.e.
    Visited today and was told she was not in a good mood. Wouldn't let anyone help her with personal care.

    She had bitten the carer. One she has bitten before.

    Sat down with her and my cousin who was visiting. We chatted to one another . Mum didn't engage at all and if she tried it was intelligible.

    I tried to sneak out but she awake from her slumber and there was another altercation at the door resulting in mum hurting the same carer in her breast.

    I just wish this was all over formy mum. My cousin sawher last year and is shocked at the deterioration. Feel free to flame me all you wish but enough is enough. My mums quality of life is so miserable. Hateful horrible.
     
  2. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,958
    Many of sometimes feel as you do - surely death would be better than this life? The only comfort then is the hope that perhaps the next change in the disease progression might be a little kinder to the patient and those who love them and care for them.

    Hope you're able to get some sleep now ... everything's worse when you're tired.
     
  3. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,668
    Salford
    So sorry to hear what you had to say dottyd, nothing more to add it's just all such a ack of **** and wishing for it to end isn't wrong, I'm sure there's a little bit in all our hearts wishing for the same thing, not for ourselves but so our loved one's misery can finally be over.
    K
     
  4. cragmaid

    cragmaid Registered User

    Oct 18, 2010
    7,963
    North East England
    What a shame all round:(
    I have no advice just sadness for you and Mum.
     
  5. Long-Suffering

    Long-Suffering Registered User

    Jul 6, 2015
    426
    Hi Dotty,

    Your feelings are totally understandable. My dad had an aneurysm about 6 years ago. By pure chance it was found before it burst. The doc said it was so huge it was a miracle he was still alive. Then just a few years later he started with the dementia. At the time of the aneurysm, I thought we were so lucky. Now I get more and more convinced that it would have been better for him to have gone then - quickly and still with all his faculties and dignity intact. I look at photos of him just a few years ago and think that man, my real dad, is gone now. We all feel like that, I guess.

    LS
     

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