Joint bank account with sufferer...

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by watcherman, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,990
    Cotswolds
    Up to date?...

    I've been looking at this old thread, and wondering if it could be bumped up, and perhaps some clever person might update anything that's changed. Just a thought, perhaps everything has changed. Can anyone advise where we can find this infirmation for ourselves?
     
  2. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,887
    Male
    North Manchester
  3. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,990
    Cotswolds
    THANKYOU Nitram...
     
  4. Salamander

    Salamander Registered User

    Dec 18, 2014
    2
    West Yorkshire
    Still a little late to post but I have experienced problems with HSBC and POA very recently. I wanted to change bank account for my parents from joint names to sole name of my dad as mum is now in full time residential care. One branch said yes it can be done and presented my dad with a form to complete the transaction, went into my local branch with POA docs to register with them and get the account changed and they refused. Would not do it even though the lasting POA is a legal document. As a result I shall close the bank account and go elsewhere. No customer service it has nothing to do with the bank how we choose to use the account. When I challenged them on what the purpose of the form was if not for situations like this I was told "the form is for divorcing couples"....great so there's more consideration gone into that life stage than someone with no mental capacity.
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,189
    Female
    South coast
    Was this the people on the desk or the bank manager?
    My experience is that people on the front desk often have no idea about POA (or, in my case, deputyship). Its much better to book an appointment with the bank manager if you want to do something with the POA
     
  6. katydid

    katydid Registered User

    Oct 23, 2018
    36
    After a death you are correct things are usually quite straightforward. BUT. Not. Whilst one partner is alive, but without capacity. It can be a horrendous story. Get an LPA
     

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