Itching and scratching

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Caity, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Caity

    Caity Registered User

    Jan 25, 2011
    1
    Hello everyone, i'm a newbie!!

    fourteen months ago, I took my elderly aunt out of a nursing home to come and live with me for various reasons, this has not been without its challenges I can assure you.....but we are plodding along and she has (touch wood) been better that she had in the 3 years previously in care.

    We have various problems but the one I would like your advice on today is itching and scratching, she has psoriasis in her head and a patch of skin near her bottom that at the first available opportunity she digs, she tells me it is a habbit, and I ply her with various creams that have been prescribed. I have tried to explain how itching all the time just makes the problem worse (she often draws blood. The two areas can look so sore, the cream helps, but the relief from it gives is short lived. The whole problem is exacerbated by her dementia and she naturally forgets what she is doing. Does anyone else have similar problems with their loved one. I am currently using Dovonex in her head (but this leaves her hair really greasy) and aqueous and diprobase for her other area.
     
  2. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Hello Caity:
    This is difficult. I think you are doing excellently and already have medical advice about the psoriasis and skin problems.

    I think you can only continue with as much cream as necessary. If the skin is broken maybe you need a district nurse and/or doctor to look at it and advise. It may be that a dressing may be useful (doubtful on the head :rolleyes:). The trouble is any dressing is likely to be pulled off because of the dementia.
     
  3. burfordthecat

    burfordthecat Registered User

    Jan 9, 2008
    1,707
    Female
    Leicestershire
    Hi

    Welcome to Talking Point. My daughter has suffered skin conditions since being only a few months old. I was advised to use aqueous but found, in my daughter's case, that is actually made her skin hurt - an almost burning sensation. I have since only used diprobase and it has been very successful. The good thing about diprobase is that there are no active ingredients and it can be used as often as needed without worrying about side effects, for a long as needed. My daughter has been using it daily for 5 years and we have only had success with it.

    Love Carina x x
     
  4. nogginthenog

    nogginthenog Registered User

    Dec 8, 2009
    47
    North
    Your GP may also be able to give you an anti-itch ointment which might reduce the scratching
     

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