1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Is this a scam? It sounds like it!

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by hollysmum, May 5, 2015.

  1. hollysmum

    hollysmum Registered User

    Sep 13, 2010
    56
    Good morning everyone! My dad has asked me to check out a product which is called AFASource. He has had a leaflet which says it's some sort of blue/green algae, a "superfood", that miraculously regenerates stem cells, which can in turn lead to "guaranteed good health". Now how genuine does that sound to you? Bless him, I fully understand that he wants to try anything that might have the tiniest chance of restoring my mum to her former glory, but my very basic checks so far suggest that this is just another scam. It says that AFA stands for Aphanizomenon Flos-Aquae, and that it is the reason the Modoc indians (apparently a native American tribe) have managed to survive for over 10,000 years without getting so much as a sniffle. This is "despite having contact with other people". Astounding, isn't it?!! It states that, in the case of Alzheimer's "AFASource Caplets boosts the functioning of the synapses that connect the neurons, greatly increasing mental acuity". Should you order some of these caplets, you get a FREE! magnetic pain relief bracelet! I promised I would investigate this, but I think I know what answers I might get from Forum members....
     
  2. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,417
    A quick googling reveals that not only does this come under the "too good to be true" category, depending on where you buy them from, you may not actually get the product and put your credit card details at risk.
     
  3. CeliaW

    CeliaW Registered User

    Jan 29, 2009
    5,653
    Hampshire
  4. hollysmum

    hollysmum Registered User

    Sep 13, 2010
    56
    Thank you Jennifer and Celia - I was virtually certain this was a scam, as I'd already seen on a well-known search engine a "Complaints" site for this! It irritates me so much that such companies think it's perfectly OK to play on someone's misfortune/illness/worry just to make money. My dad would, of course, do anything to try and improve my mum's condition, and they know this. I will check out the science link, Celia, as I like to try and research anything connected with AD.
     

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