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Is dementia classed as vulnerable?

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
1,789
Welcome to the forum. Are you referring to the Government coronavirus advice? A list has been published detailing the definitions of those who are considered at high risk and vulnerable (all over 70's) but dementia is not one of the medical conditions specifically listed: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-social-distancing-and-for-vulnerable-people/guidance-on-social-distancing-for-everyone-in-the-uk-and-protecting-older-people-and-vulnerable-adults

There is a sub-forum specifically about coronavirus here which you may find helpful: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/forums/coronavirus-covid-19.83/
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,929
North Manchester
If you are not referring to coronavirus but more generally a diagnosis of dementia does not mean the person is vulnerable.

A person becomes vulnerable when , for whatever cause, they are a danger to themselves and/or others, or are easily scammed by unscrupulous people.
 

annielou

Registered User
Sep 27, 2019
734
Yorkshire
I'd say in terms of vulnerable as in people who should isolate as more at risk of being seriously ill if they catch virus then dementia probably doesn't make you more likely to be seriously ill like diseases that weaken the immune system or breathing capabilities would. I do think some people with dementia might be less likely to be able to process and remember the advice about social distancing, handwashing etc so may if out and about be more at risk of catching it or spreading it. In case of other people being allowed to go out in public if caring for a vulnerable person, then I think going out to care for a person with dementia should be included in that. I'd class my mum as vulnerable as without me going to see each day she wouldn't take her medication or eat a hot meal as she cant cook now. Also some days she cant figure out how to work tv or heating so could be sat there cold and hungry without help. She also can't cope with being on her own all day so I still go to see her each day and if I was asked why I was out thats what I'd say is the reason why.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
8,794
Yorkshire
hello @Jackmack
a warm welcome to DTP

as far as this virus goes, dementia isn't in the description of those who are vulnerable to the symptoms so should self isolate or shield

so as long as there are no underlying health issues, it's fine to follow the self distancing rules, staying at home except to shop for essentials if necessary and one session of exercise

if you feel you aren't able to look after yourself and feel vulnerable, let us know, we may be able to suggest ways to help
 

Shm123

Registered User
May 2, 2018
14
I'm with Annielou on this one. My mother has Alzheimer's and lives on her own with my daily support for all manner of things. She doesn't go out much so I am not worried she may do that, but I she doesn't understand what is going on and needs daily checking re. meals, heating, meds and nearly always some other situation arising like flooding the toilet floor by flushing a pad down it. She needs daily checking on so I continue to do it. In my opinion her inability to be aware of her own welfare makes her a vulnerable person - not vulnerable specifically for Coronavirus, but vulnerable in general.
 

Jan L

New member
Mar 26, 2020
1
I'd say in terms of vulnerable as in people who should isolate as more at risk of being seriously ill if they catch virus then dementia probably doesn't make you more likely to be seriously ill like diseases that weaken the immune system or breathing capabilities would. I do think some people with dementia might be less likely to be able to process and remember the advice about social distancing, handwashing etc so may if out and about be more at risk of catching it or spreading it. In case of other people being allowed to go out in public if caring for a vulnerable person, then I think going out to care for a person with dementia should be included in that. I'd class my mum as vulnerable as without me going to see each day she wouldn't take her medication or eat a hot meal as she cant cook now. Also some days she cant figure out how to work tv or heating so could be sat there cold and hungry without help. She also can't cope with being on her own all day so I still go to see her each day and if I was asked why I was out thats what I'd say is the reason why.
I am 74 and a Carer for my Husband (77)who is in the later stages of Dementia. He no longer knows my name, he can't speak only to say yes or no, but not necessarily the right answer, he can't find his way around the house, so I can't leave him in a room on his own very long, as I have to direct him to the toilet, and then have to try to get him to take his trousers and pants down and help him decide whether he needs to sit down or stand up. If I don't he will pee in the wash basin or the bath, anything white or stainless steel in the kitchen, I do sometimes, in the evening, end up going to sleep after only having 3/4 hours a night of sleep, the night before. He can walk, but very slowly, and can't understand the need to distance from other people when we are out. I haven't been out for 2 weeks now and have relied on others to get my shopping as I can't get a slot online for delivery or click and collect. On top of this my Sister 79, who supports me, has been recently diagnosed with blood cancer, her Husband 77 has MS and is unable to walk, they are not very good on the computer. I hoped I would be able to order groceries etc for all of us, they only live across the road, but this just doesn't seem possible, when I went on to the GOV website to register as vulnerable for priority slots of delivery or click and collect, they say I do not qualify. It is all so frustrating. I do not have any Carers for my Husband so do everything myself for how long I do not know.
 

annielou

Registered User
Sep 27, 2019
734
Yorkshire
@Jan L Thats so unfair, I don't think the goverment really understand what caring for a person with dementia involves. Would your sister or her husband be classed as vulnerable on the gov website? have you tried registering your sister or her husband as the vulnerable person for a priority slot and you order on all your behalves?
 

NotTooLate

Registered User
Jun 10, 2017
171
Alvechurch
toolate.blog
Hi Jan... I don't know if this will help, but Sainsbury have put out this statement about shopping online

If you live in England and you are over 70 years of age
You can get access to priority home delivery slots by calling us on 0800 953 4988

If you live in Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland and you are vulnerable or over 70 years of age
We’re working hard to gather details of elderly and vulnerable people living in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If this applies to you, please call us on 0800 953 4988.

Thinking of you!
Richard
 

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