Giggling

Wendy C

Registered User
Jan 29, 2012
121
0
West Midlands
Hi. The last few times I have been to see Mom, she keeps giggling at us. The carers say she giggles at them as well. I am not sure to make of this. It is very strange but chuckles away. Anyone else had this?
 

Tin

Registered User
May 18, 2014
4,820
0
UK
My mum seems to giggle a lot more these days at the oddest things, in fact we are sitting here watching tv and shes giggling. Nothing funny is being said or done. A bit inappropriate too, but she giggles at people when we are out.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
25,067
0
South coast
Hi. The last few times I have been to see Mom, she keeps giggling at us. The carers say she giggles at them as well. I am not sure to make of this. It is very strange but chuckles away. Anyone else had this?

Its called emotional lability, Wendy. People with this often cry for no reason too. Its a symptom of dementia (among other things) Im afraid, though not a common one.
I thought this site looked helpful

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-emotional-lability.htm
 

Miss Dew

Registered User
Aug 5, 2015
2
0
Wiltshire
Hi. The last few times I have been to see Mom, she keeps giggling at us. The carers say she giggles at them as well. I am not sure to make of this. It is very strange but chuckles away. Anyone else had this?

my Mum giggles a lot, she wakes in the morning chuckling away to herself. I am delighted for her that her mood is so buoyant and she is enjoying her self so much it overflows with giggles and smiles .
 

Wendy C

Registered User
Jan 29, 2012
121
0
West Midlands
Its called emotional lability, Wendy. People with this often cry for no reason too. Its a symptom of dementia (among other things) Im afraid, though not a common one.
I thought this site looked helpful

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-emotional-lability.htm

Thank you for that. Very interesting. Its just very odd sat talking to my Mom and she giggles. Glad its giggling rather than crying.
 

lavenderblue

Registered User
Nov 2, 2014
23
0
UK
Stroke patients may also experience PBA. My father suffered a severe stroke several years before he died which left him considerably disabled and with virtually no speech. Post-stroke, he was prone to involuntary episodes of laughter which were not related to amusing situations or necessarily a reflection of his mood, and were sometimes triggered by embarrassment or frustration.

There's more information here:

http://www.pbainfo.org/science
 

Long-Suffering

Registered User
Jul 6, 2015
425
0
I'm happy any time my dad isn't crying. It's lovely to see him laughing or giggling, however inappropriate it is. He isn't often happy these days. Poor old ******.

LS
 

Kijo

Registered User
Feb 9, 2014
31
0
My OH will often have small laughs throughout the day for no reason that I can see. Occassionally I will ask him what he is thinking about that makes him laugh, but he never has an answer; it is like he doesn't realize he laughed out loud.
His response at some situations can drive me crazy because he will giggle or laugh at what I think are serious situations - it's like his response meter is mixed up. He knows it is not funny, but still has a laugh anyway.
Thank you for providing links re: PBA, it helps to understand these oddities.
 

Elorac13

New member
Feb 16, 2023
5
0
Same here, my OH can constantly giggle at anything and at any time (home, out shopping or just out walking). He can also have the crying at the TV but says oh no my eyes are leaking again. It is hard to get used to tbh but at least he seems happy and it's his reality.