Eye test

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
I took John for an eye test this morning -- he broke his second pair of glasses in his fall on Monday.

I was dreading it, because John can't read at all, or communicate very much. I had warned them before we went.

Anyway, we had a young optometrist, can't have been qualified long, and I thought it would be a disaster. In fact, it was the opposite. He was patience itself with John, and if he thought John was getting agitated, immediately moved on to something else.

John was brilliant, too. Although he couldn't name many of the letters, he started air-drawing them with his finger -- his own idea. On one board, there was an N, which he drew correctly. The next letter was Z and he said 'the same but over', and drew that too. That really amazed me, that he could perceive the relationship.

So top marks all round, I came away feeling very humble.

I asked the optometrist if he had had any training in dealing with cases like John, he said no. He agreed that it should be part of the course.

I think a complimentary letter to his manager and head office is in order.
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
So pleased for you Hazel, another hurdle over.

Didn't John do well......you must have been so proud. Funny how we always want them to do their best.

Quite agree about the letter. It is good to be able to be complimentary and, in my opinion, getting rarer these days.
 

twink

Registered User
Oct 28, 2005
265
68
Cambridgeshire UK
That's great Hazel. How clever of John. I was only talking about Steve's glasses yesterday at the home. They were lost months ago when he was in hospital and he wore them all the time and I kept mentioning it because although he can't read, he looks at photos sometimes and I know he won't be able to see them. I have been wondering how he would get on having an eye test. Thanks for reminding me, I'm going to mention it again when I go and see him.

I agree about sending a letter too.

Sue
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,552
Kent
What a good experience Hazel.

Funny isn`t it, when something is dreaded it often turns out fine.

I think the new generation of professionals are losing the attitude many of the older ones are guilty of, that of putting themselves on pedestals.

It`s amazing John still had the concept of the relationship between the N and Z. Maybe he has retained some of his artistic background.

Take care

Love
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Hazel
I think it is great that John could reason? between Z and N on it's side.
I personally would never have thought of that.

It is also great that a young optician, would know how to handle someone with AD.
A letter, is definately deserved

Alfjess
 

Norman

Registered User
Oct 9, 2003
4,348
Birmingham Hades
I think the new generation of professionals are losing the attitude many of the older ones are guilty of, that of putting themselves on pedestals.
Hi Sylvia
Professionals these days cannot afford to put themselves on pedestals,too many have fallen off.

Hazel
I will complain where justified ,but will praise where justified,a letter to the manager is a must.
Norman
 

Nell

Registered User
Aug 9, 2005
1,170
68
Australia
I couldn't agree more about sending a letter of compliment to his Manager! Not only does it reward the young man himself, it tends to make others more aware of the need for careful and empathetic treatment for those with AD.

Just a point to add re glasses: Mum recently had her's redone because I read another post on TP a little while ago about someone not being able to complete the test at all. I started to think about how awful that would be if you needed glasses but couldn't get them because you couldn't do the test. So I booked Mum in ASAP! Now she has two new pairs (one of mutifocals and one of reading glasses.)

I asked the optometrist about the future re: glasses when Mum could no longer do the test, and she said that as they have Mum's current script now, they could always make up the same glasses again - even if they weren't exactly right they would be better than no glasses at all.

I urge anyone with an AD patient who can still have the test to do so and to get their current script on record so that this could be done if glasses are broken, or lost.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Hi Nell

That was what I expected to happen with John, that he would just have a repeat of his last prescription. I was so impressed that the young man was able to do at least a partial test.

The other important point is that he was able to check for cataracts and glaucoma -- both fortunately negative.
 

DeborahBlythe

Registered User
Dec 1, 2006
9,222
Nell said:
I urge anyone with an AD patient who can still have the test to do so and to get their current script on record so that this could be done if glasses are broken, or lost.
That's good advice, Nell.
Hazel, so glad all went well. I remember when I first started work years ago that a letter complimenting something I had done took me totally unawares and really made me feel tremendously valued. I still have a copy of it!
Actually , bye the bye, the people who thanked me, over the years, tended to be the ones for whom I had done, in my opinion, very little. The people for whom I sweated, often didn't ever remark at all!

I hope this doesn't sound self-satisfied, but I was then and remain now really thankful that there were people who went out of their way to encourage and support me, when I thought I had done not very much to help them.
When I think carers are acting well and have a special rapport with my mum or are thoughtful and gentle, I mention it to the manager of the home because they are like gold dust and I know how much a good word meant to me!

Definitely write!
 

Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
I wouldn't agree with that, certainly encountered many youngsters up on pedestals during the short time that I was looking after my mother.

Grannie G said:
I think the new generation of professionals are losing the attitude many of the older ones are guilty of, that of putting themselves on pedestals.
 

Nell

Registered User
Aug 9, 2005
1,170
68
Australia
Skye The other important point is that he was able to check for cataracts and glaucoma -- both fortunately negative.[/QUOTE said:
Yes! Mum was checked too and on the first check her pressures were too high - possible indication of glaucoma. The Optometrist said to have them checked again when we picked up the glasses as the pressures can just be high on one day. Thank goodness, on the second check she was found to be OK.

We have a history of glaucoma on my other side of the family - Dad's Mum went blind from it, quite early (seventies). So we are VERY conscious of having our levels checked.

So glad Hazel that John could manage the test - it is such a relief when they can still do something we feared may not be possible. Like others, I'm in awe of his ability to create answers that correctly conveys his thoughts, even when the words were not there. Quite a guy!! (But I guess you always knew that!! ;) )
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Nell said:


So glad Hazel that John could manage the test - it is such a relief when they can still do something we feared may not be possible. Like others, I'm in awe of his ability to create answers that correctly conveys his thoughts, even when the words were not there. Quite a guy!! (But I guess you always knew that!! ;) )
Yes, I always knew that!

John used to be an architect, and was a good watercolour painter. I guess now that his language has gone, letters are meaningless, but he can still identify (and even relate) shapes.

The brain is a wonderful organ!