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Erratic sleep pattern

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
My OH has, in last 6 weeks had an even worse sleep pattern than previously as, not only being unable to sleep after just 5 hours of nighttime sleep but during rest of the day constantly falls asleep and in some awkward and uncomfortable positions in her armchair. Upon waking she is disoriented and confused but knows that she is sleeping all the time but just can’t stop herself. Sleep can come on so suddenly from being wide awake to snoring in seconds. Alzheimer’s progression or something else? Anyone else come across it as severely?
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,137
Kent
Anyone else come across it as severely?
I haven`t @Agzy although my husband did sleep a lot as his dementia progressed and was unable to occupy himself or even sustain interest in anything unless I was taking an active part in keeping him awake.
 

greensox

Registered User
May 18, 2017
8
somerset
My OH has, in last 6 weeks had an even worse sleep pattern than previously as, not only being unable to sleep after just 5 hours of nighttime sleep but during rest of the day constantly falls asleep and in some awkward and uncomfortable positions in her armchair. Upon waking she is disoriented and confused but knows that she is sleeping all the time but just can’t stop herself. Sleep can come on so suddenly from being wide awake to snoring in seconds. Alzheimer’s progression or something else? Anyone else come across it as severely?
Hi Agzy, my OH is exactly the same. It started around four weeks ago. He can fall asleep at the breakfast table and just keeps falling asleep all day. It is hard to wake him up and he looks bewildered when you do. He just can't stop himself from sleeping and because of this his sleep pattern at night is disturbed now.
He has gone from sleeping like a baby at night to waking up constantly and being awake for hours. He doesn't get up though as he now cannot get himself out of bed unaided. I don't know why he has suddenly changed, he is not on any medication. He fell asleep in front of the continence nurse at our appointment this week and she just said don't worry about it, it's normal and happens a lot.
 

Dunroamin

Registered User
May 5, 2019
36
I am the same. Somedays alert enough to read (not that I remember what) or garden, but I sleep very badly at night now, fall alseep during the day. I often have breakfast and go back to bed until lunch time. It is so very difficult to stop it.
 

greensox

Registered User
May 18, 2017
8
somerset
My OH has, in last 6 weeks had an even worse sleep pattern than previously as, not only being unable to sleep after just 5 hours of nighttime sleep but during rest of the day constantly falls asleep and in some awkward and uncomfortable positions in her armchair. Upon waking she is disoriented and confused but knows that she is sleeping all the time but just can’t stop herself. Sleep can come on so suddenly from being wide awake to snoring in seconds. Alzheimer’s progression or something else? Anyone else come across it as severely?
 

greensox

Registered User
May 18, 2017
8
somerset
Hi Agzy, last night we managed 8 hours sleep, wonderful. Think it was because I kept getting him up every time he nodded apart from letting him have a good hour in the early afternoon. I got him walking about, dancing, doing exercises to help with his mobility. Trouble is it is very hard work on the part of the carer, you are unable to do anything else and have to be constantly on alert to keep them awake, so I don't think I can sustain that. And it hasn't made any difference because this morning he is just the same, constantly falling asleep.
 

MrsDoyle

Registered User
Mar 28, 2019
61
East Mids
My PWD went through a stage of sleeping all the time, to the extent his daughter reported me to SS for negligence, suggesting I was letting him sleep his life away. (He also got hold of the car keys once when he still had a licence but we didn’t want him to drive) Nothing I could do would stop him wanting to go back to bed. In fact, he got excited at the prospect of being allowed to go back to sleep after breakfast.
Further down the line, he has had a serious stroke and has nighttime insomnia every other night. I’m fortunate to have live in carers but they are destroyed by an all night session as they do half the night each and can’t function properly during the day when he needs 2 people for personal care. I can hear them at night and I also have broken sleep but I have done my turn too and obviously, I am caring for him with them in the day. His constant talk of being useless, finished etc and begging for help to cure him is soul destroying and exhausting for us all. We have tried getting visitors in to keep him awake in the day and tire him out but it doesn’t work. He’s awake all day and night! The awful thing is, he’s desperate to sleep but can’t and is so depressed and frustrated by it. He’s also bedbound from the stroke and it has advanced his dementia somewhat. We often think he’s gone to sleep but 5 minutes later he’s wide awake again and wishing he was dead. But when he gets to sleep, it is so deep we can’t wake him to try to get a routine.

I’m sorry I’m not much help, but I’m just saying that sleep patterns are erratic. Sometimes I turn my back for a second and he’s asleep but not for long. He is often confused for a while after waking again and doesn’t realise he’s at home.
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
My PWD went through a stage of sleeping all the time, to the extent his daughter reported me to SS for negligence, suggesting I was letting him sleep his life away. (He also got hold of the car keys once when he still had a licence but we didn’t want him to drive) Nothing I could do would stop him wanting to go back to bed. In fact, he got excited at the prospect of being allowed to go back to sleep after breakfast.
Further down the line, he has had a serious stroke and has nighttime insomnia every other night. I’m fortunate to have live in carers but they are destroyed by an all night session as they do half the night each and can’t function properly during the day when he needs 2 people for personal care. I can hear them at night and I also have broken sleep but I have done my turn too and obviously, I am caring for him with them in the day. His constant talk of being useless, finished etc and begging for help to cure him is soul destroying and exhausting for us all. We have tried getting visitors in to keep him awake in the day and tire him out but it doesn’t work. He’s awake all day and night! The awful thing is, he’s desperate to sleep but can’t and is so depressed and frustrated by it. He’s also bedbound from the stroke and it has advanced his dementia somewhat. We often think he’s gone to sleep but 5 minutes later he’s wide awake again and wishing he was dead. But when he gets to sleep, it is so deep we can’t wake him to try to get a routine.

I’m sorry I’m not much help, but I’m just saying that sleep patterns are erratic. Sometimes I turn my back for a second and he’s asleep but not for long. He is often confused for a while after waking again and doesn’t realise he’s at home.
Oh @MrsDoyle how disheartening and tough for you! My OH is not at serious stage in that she can, more or less, look after herself although mobility is an issue. I presume I have the stage your PWD is at still to come, not very heartwarming! All I can do is wish you the strength of mind and body to cope x
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
Hi Agzy, last night we managed 8 hours sleep, wonderful. Think it was because I kept getting him up every time he nodded apart from letting him have a good hour in the early afternoon. I got him walking about, dancing, doing exercises to help with his mobility. Trouble is it is very hard work on the part of the carer, you are unable to do anything else and have to be constantly on alert to keep them awake, so I don't think I can sustain that. And it hasn't made any difference because this morning he is just the same, constantly falling asleep.
@greensox, I just wish my OH was interested and willing enough to participate in anything other than TV. It has taken an age and a couple of falls to get her to use a stick and to come on short strolls with me as an attempt to get her more mobile. I agree the life of a carer even when life is relatively calm is a constant and exhausting battle and the loneliness of being in company of someone who is all to often asleep and when awake has little or no conversation, very demoralising.
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
I am the same. Somedays alert enough to read (not that I remember what) or garden, but I sleep very badly at night now, fall alseep during the day. I often have breakfast and go back to bed until lunch time. It is so very difficult to stop it.
How I feel for you @Dunroamin and also feel guilty in that I have somehow avoided the fact that she too is frustrated with this latest turn of events, thank you for guiding back to full “caring”.
 

MrsDoyle

Registered User
Mar 28, 2019
61
East Mids
Oh @MrsDoyle how disheartening and tough for you! My OH is not at serious stage in that she can, more or less, look after herself although mobility is an issue. I presume I have the stage your PWD is at still to come, not very heartwarming! All I can do is wish you the strength of mind and body to cope x
Thank you. He’s now suffering from post stroke insomnia. It’s more a stroke thing but the dementia doesn’t help. He’s now been awake since yesterday morning bar about 1.5 hours this morning, 20 mins tonight. It’s torture for all concerned, especially him. x
 

Starting on a journey

Registered User
Jul 9, 2019
210
I have had loads of issues with mums insomnia and tried loads of things to help.

One of the things that worked until she got fed up was lavender spray put on the pillow at bed time. It helped her and one of our cats have some blissful hours of sleep.
The other thing we did , agreed by gp, was to have paracetamol before bed, that helps too. She does sleep a lot but luckily as she can still walk albeit with “wheels “, I take her out most days which mentally and physically exhausts her.
Hoping that your oh sleeps tonight, it must be awful for him (as well as you obviously)
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
I have had loads of issues with mums insomnia and tried loads of things to help.

One of the things that worked until she got fed up was lavender spray put on the pillow at bed time. It helped her and one of our cats have some blissful hours of sleep.
The other thing we did , agreed by gp, was to have paracetamol before bed, that helps too. She does sleep a lot but luckily as she can still walk albeit with “wheels “, I take her out most days which mentally and physically exhausts her.
Hoping that your oh sleeps tonight, it must be awful for him (as well as you obviously)
Thank you @Starting on a journey and might try the lavender spray and paracetamol if she will take it. She refuses to countenance ‘wheels’ although has conceded the stick is essential now. Thank you
 

MrsDoyle

Registered User
Mar 28, 2019
61
East Mids
I haven`t @Agzy although my husband did sleep a lot as his dementia progressed and was unable to occupy himself or even sustain interest in anything unless I was taking an active part in keeping him awake.
I have found this to be the same before my OH’s stroke, except for him reading the newspaper. I don’t think he was taking it in but it kept him awake. A trip out for a coffee n cake late in the afternoon was the only reason he’d get out of bed after lunch sometimes.If I didn’t take him out or have something planned with his friends, he’d sleep. Luckily, he slept at night too. It’s all changed now.
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
5,746
Chester
I haven't used lavender spray but in desperation when a baby wouldn't sleep cut off a whole load 9f lavender heads and crushed them in a box which I placed under the cot . It worked.

Try sneaking the spray on her pillow when she isn't there and if queried say maybe new scent of washing powder
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,280
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
I haven't used lavender spray but in desperation when a baby wouldn't sleep cut off a whole load 9f lavender heads and crushed them in a box which I placed under the cot . It worked.

Try sneaking the spray on her pillow when she isn't there and if queried say maybe new scent of washing powder
Good recommendation, thank you
 

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