• Expert Q&A: Rare dementias - Tues 3 March, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of rare dementias. It will be hosted by Nikki and Seb from Rare Dementia Support. If you have any questions about rare dementias, they will be here to answer them on Tuesday 3 March between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

EPA advice

Kate P

Registered User
Jul 6, 2007
565
Merseyside
Will the questions ever stop you ask yourselves? It doesn't look like it - the more I learn the more questions I have!!:)

Well, today's question is about how we go about claiming EPA for mum.

Dad really needs to as she doesn't understand money anymore - we've already took her bank card off her but she still remembers where he hides the savings books and at anytime is walking around with hundreds of pounds in her handbag! Heaven only knows how much money she's given out so far.

Plus there are benefits that they will both be entitled to but mum won't sign the forms as she thinks there is nothing wrong with her.

I don't really want to go down the appointee route with benefits, as that will necessitate a home visit - given that mum used to work for them, it would be very distressing for her to be visited by them now.

EPA seems the only option but given that mum probably won't consent to this either, what can be done? Would we be able to get it without her consent if we can prove her diagnosis?

I looked on the PGO site but it just confused me - isn't taking much these days!
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,406
Kent
Hi Kate, We`re still waiting for mutual EPA`s to be processed.

My husband will agree to this as it`s mutual, but he wouldn`t have agreed to me getting an EPA on him as, like your mother he still thinks he`ll recover and believes he can manage his own money.

I`m almost sure there`s no way you can get an EPA without your mother`s consent and her showing she understands the meaning of one. This is to prevent unscrupulous people taking advantage.

Sorry I can`t be more positive.
 

Kate P

Registered User
Jul 6, 2007
565
Merseyside
Hmm, well that's definitely going to be a problem because even if we could convince her to consent on the basis that she and dad did mutual ones like you and your hubby, she certainly wouldn't be able to show that she understood what it was.

Does anyone know of any other possibilities?
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,406
Kent
Are you sure, Kate?

The consultant asked my husband if he understood what a Power of Attorney was and he said it means you can control the money of another person. Would not your mother understand that?
 

jackie1

Registered User
Jun 6, 2007
238
Cheshire
Kate, It may be worth checking the AZ branch in your area. The one here runs a brilliant course 3 times a year. It is over 9 weeks and covers all aspects of AZ/dementia. I have found it a brilliant source of information and support.

As for EPA, do your parents have a solicitor who knows them well? If they do they may be able to come to the house when your mum is having a good day and be able to honestly say that she understands what she is signing. There are solicitors specifically trained in dealing with clients with dementia and the AZ Society may be able to put you in touch with one in your area.

Without her consent I think you would have to go through the courts. Which is costly and will place more restraints on how your father manages the accounts.
 
Last edited:

sue38

Registered User
Mar 6, 2007
10,854
51
Wigan, Lancs
Hi Kate,

If your Mum cannot sign an EPA (either because she refuses or because she doesn't have the necessary understanding) the only option would be for you or your Dad to apply to the Court of Protecion to be appointed as her Receiver.

This is a much more costly and complicated procedure than an EPA. This is the link to the Public Guardianship Office's explanation of being appointed receiver.

http://www.guardianship.gov.uk/theservice/externalreceivers.htm

You will see that you need a statement from a doctor confirming that your Mum is not mentally capable of handling her affairs. This certificate is normally provided by the consultant and he is entitled to charge for giving the certificate.

Notice also needs to be served on relatives, at least 3 and all in one class. So for example your Dad would count as 1 and you would count as 1. If you have brothers and siblings they would all need to be served (not just 1 to make up the 3 relatives). If you have no brothers or sisters your Mum's brothers and sisters would have to be served, or nieces and nephews. You can see that it can get complicated.

Have a look at the forms, they can be downloaded from the PGO's web site, but you may feel that it is worth pursuing the EPA and or appointee for benefits.

Good luck
 

Kate P

Registered User
Jul 6, 2007
565
Merseyside
Wow it really does get compicated doesn't it?

Well thank you all for the advice - I'll get cracking and see what we can do! Nothing to be gained by putting it off.
 

katherine

Registered User
Sep 5, 2006
57
maybe sell it to your mum that it's something everyone ought to do of a certain age - or of any age - you don't have to say it's because she specifically ha Alzheimers - just a sensible precaution as she gets older....