1. Lyn13

    Lyn13 New member

    Jan 20, 2019
    3
    Hi there, My Dad always liked doing a jigsaw when I was a child so it's something I'm trying out for him and a carer that's visits each week. The 750 piece one is far to hard (for them both I think :() so I've ordered a 200 large piece jigsaw from Amazon. I would be interested to hear of particular makes or companies that other people have used for dementia friendly puzzles. I don't really want to go down the childish route. Many thanks
     
  2. lell

    lell New member

    Nov 21, 2017
    5
    hello all! I think we find ourselves sharing this frustration of the person with dementia not wanting to do the things that we try to get them to do? I must say that I did laugh at crybaby's white choc escapade, my dad would probably do the same! Hard isn't it (not just the domino!!)? What they used to like doing, and what we think they could try never actually work, maybe as they are no longer the same person that we used to know, or we are, inadvertantly, thinking from our own perspective? Or maybe they are aware that things are not the same, and want to maintain a positive image, not one of failure? It's frustrating for us, as we know what is coming up with regards to abilities. We know how many hours they have just sat in the chair (doing nothing, as far as we can see), they don't. We see the person, but do we really? They don't! So, will we ever get it right? I don't think so. I have spent a fortune on games, books, mobility aids etc., all to no avail. As he becomes more egocentric, it gets harder to please. So, I no longer do battle, it saves a hell of a lot of emotional capital. I encourage, and if he doesn't want to, then so be it (unless its a health issue of course!)
     
  3. philologus

    philologus Registered User

    Nov 19, 2011
    2
    North East
    I took a black and white school class photo with my wife in it when she was 11.
    I cleaned it up on Photoshop and enlarged it a bit and then had it made into a jigsaw of 500 pieces.
    It cost very little to do this and I think it was an offer that Aldi had at the time so was less than a tenner to have the jigsaw made.
    My wife - now 74 - loved it and put it together in about three days and remembered many of the other kids on it too.
    It has now been framed and is on the wall where she can often see it and smile.
    I sometimes take it down and we go through the names of her schoolmates and talk about them and whether she still sees any of them etc.

    I'm now considering which old photo to try next.
     
  4. Dot may

    Dot may Registered User

    Apr 10, 2016
    4
    Marionq.
    Where do you get the daily large print from. I tried the local newsagent with no luck. I’d be grateful to know. Thanks Dot- may
     
  5. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,793
    Female
    Scotland
    I don’t buy a special one. If I buy John a tabloid it is standard as far as I can see for there to be lots of big print and headlines as well as lots of pictures. In the past we both read the Guardian but I subscribe to it online now. I just checked Johns paper right now which he’s been going through since about 10 am. He gets the Daily Record which is a bog standard Scottish tabloid. Although he can physically read I doubt very much if he retains anything.
     

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  6. Wildsounds

    Wildsounds New member

    Mar 7, 2018
    1
    My husband is 87 now and has had dementia since he was 75. Games would not be of interest to him at all but I encourage him to do things he can manage. He is happy washing the pots and drying them and preparing vegetables for our evening meal. He also manages to fill all the bird feeders every morning and likes watching the various birds visiting the feeders. We have badgers visiting our garden every night and he always has a look to see if they are there before we go to bed and loves to see them. He likes Birdwatching magazine. He does read the articles (but can't remember the actual content) and loves the pictures. He has a great interest in nature and always has had.
    He was evacuated to Herefordshire from Liverpool during the war (in May 1940 to be precise) and can remember everything with such clarity from that time of his life. I subscribed to The British Evacuees Association for him last year and he loves the bi-monthly magazine they produce. I also applied for him to be registered as an evacuee with them and he loves the certificate he received acknowledging the fact that he was an evacuee.
    At the National Arboretum there is a sculpture dedicated to all evacuees. I bought him the DVD of the Memorial Dedication ceremony and he enjoyed that. He expressed a wish to go to the National Arboretum to see the actual sculpure so we are going to head up there in the next few weeks. We have a motorhome so will go up in that so we have our home from home with us. When I find something that he shows an interest in, I act on it to make it a reality.
    A year ago, I took on a job at the local village shop for just two afternoons a week. My husband can cope with that and I involved him in the decision to take on the job. We needed extra money and that comes from the shop now.and he knows that it makes life easier for us both.
    I also involve him in selling our surplus items on Ebay. He doesn't do any of the listings but he loves to help pack the items when they are sold and is really interested when I announce we have made a sale. I also involve him in helping me to get the photos taken and to putting the completed items in our container boxes.
    Yes, his memory isn't improving but, if a problem arises, I seek out an answer and act upon it so that it isn't such a big deal for him.
    We have been married 41 years and are together 24/7 (apart from my two afternoon shifts at the shop).
     
  7. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    410
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    You have a point there
     
  8. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    410
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    I like this idea and think I might try something similar if I can find where I can get it done.
     
  9. BryanG2001

    BryanG2001 Registered User

    Mar 2, 2014
    16
    Though this is for Care Home Workers it has a lot of useful information, I can't post a link in case I am spam, or corned beef, or pickled eggs. Search for "Unit 2 – Care home staff resources" or "Living well through activity in care homes". Or search on this website for "Activities/Interests" in Middle Later Stages threads for list of stuff I tried with Mum.
     
  10. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    402
    This is a very interesting thread.
    I may try simple origami (me doing it) to show Mummy who loves folding things (material, pleating her trousers etc). She also likes recipe mags - helps me to pick out what we will have for tea. I also wondered about one of those bubble blowers you get for children, with a thing you dip in the pot of bubble mixture.

    I think you may find large wooden jigsaw puzzles in charity shops, but check to make sure all the pieces are there....
    Mummy also like little tins and boxes with lids you can open easily. I have sewing kit (which she looks at whilst supervised) in one, but it is the opening and closing of the lid that she likes, more than the contents.
     
  11. Ludlow

    Ludlow Registered User

    Jul 20, 2016
    108
    SE England
    Dot may, the RNIB do large print newspapers.
     
  12. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    402
    Also, one of the best things my sister got for my Mum was a photo of her grandchildren put on a cushion. I think you send files to an online company and they do the rest. Mummy loved it and spent a lot of time hugging the cushion.
     
  13. Greenwellies

    Greenwellies New member

    Nov 11, 2017
    2
    Oh good idea.
     
  14. Lyn13

    Lyn13 New member

    Jan 20, 2019
    3
    Thank you for the suggestion. I will give it a go. I have seen this sort of thing advertised so will be easy to do.
     
  15. Lyn13

    Lyn13 New member

    Jan 20, 2019
    3
    Thank you, that is really helpful and I will follow it up.
     
  16. nanni s

    nanni s New member

    Mar 10, 2019
    1
    My oh hobbies was boating and motorbiking which he cant do now he also liked to play chess but is unable to now. Working was his other hobby now he has a tray with nuts and bolts old plugs that he takes apart . He has all manner of things on this tray and sits for hours arranging them. When he goes in the garage for more bits he says he is getting everything ready to go to work.
     
  17. Amarylis

    Amarylis New member

    May 20, 2018
    2
    The big dominoes sounds good and I will try the nuts and bolts for my OH. He is totally occupied on the iPad playing HiStar! It is an app where he groups different coloured squares, making the biggest number of squares together and so having a high score. There is no time problem and he can think of what to do for ages. he doesn't have to make the grade to go on to a higher level. It is simply grouping different coloured squares before clicking on them, which removes them. If he doesn't reach the target then another page of squares appears immediately and he continues playing.
    He has caught 'the bug' and plays all day, even through meal times. It has occupied him for four years and he really is lost without it. I hope that helps with your OH.
     
  18. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    410
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    Thank you. Unfortunately my husband can't use an iPad or a laptop.
     

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