1. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    I've tried various things to try and occupy my husband. I've bought a few games that he won't even look at, so wasted money. I've tried card games but he doesn't want to try. I suddenly thought about dominoes the other day and managed to buy some.
    I asked a couple of times if he wanted to play but he wouldn't, so was surprised today when I asked and he said he would. I explained what he had to do and he was happy to give it a go. When he couldn't go and had to take a piece from the pile he got quite excited when it was one that would go and didn't want to wait until it was his turn.
    When I won the first game he didn't seem to understand about winning, he wanted to carry on with his pieces and wondered what to do with them. He just seemed to enjoy matching the pieces and it kept him amused for a while. He did get tired after a few games but I think I'll give it another go some time.
     
  2. rhubarbtree

    rhubarbtree Registered User

    Jan 7, 2015
    462
    North West
    Hi jenniferjean,

    Exactly the same as my OH. The not waiting his turn gets quite fraught when the grandchildren are playing as well. Last time we had the dominoes out I made a domino run. He loved that.
    My OH has four dementia jigsaws which have been the best value of anything I have bought. Just recently he has not been able to do the whole jigsaw so I do most of it, when he is not around, and just leave a few pieces out. He rushes to complete the jigsaw when he sees it. Like the dominoes they are thick and tactile. I think he likes handling them.
     
  3. RosettaT

    RosettaT Registered User

    Sep 9, 2018
    193
    Female
    Mid Lincs
    #3 RosettaT, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
    My OH always said he was lucky, he found something he loved to do (pilot) and found someone to pay him for doing it. The trouble is now he dosen't have any hobbies, he would always spend his time, gardening or diy as it was useful so is he really is not interested in doing any puzzles or pasttime type things. I am always struggling to find things to keep him interested or his hands busy. He will however fold towels and pair socks for me. I think it's because he sees it as something useful not something to while away time.
     
  4. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,746
    Female
    Scotland
    My husband always had to read his daily paper end to end. I buy him a tabloid now for its larger print, more pictures and simpler language. He can read the words out loud if I ask him but of course he cannot make sense of it all. Because he is still Behaving as he once did this keeps him occupied for hours looking through the pages. I leave a pile of football magazines beside him for variety and take a pile in when he has a respite week (not often).
     
  5. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    340
    I think you have to go with the flow. Gradually games with rules become too complicated but just playing with the pieces can be fun.
     
  6. crybaby

    crybaby Registered User

    Jan 8, 2017
    42

    I have to jump in here, about dominoes.
    My hubby, before he got so out of it, was quite keen to play with dominoes I'd just bought, so we could enjoy our time a bit. I left him laying them out, while I made a cup of tea so we could spend an enjoyable half hour or so.

    Came back to say 'won't be long - I've just put the kettle on' and heard a rattling noise and saw him chewing.

    White dominoes = white chocolate, his favourite!!!
     
  7. Vic10

    Vic10 Registered User

    Feb 18, 2017
    51
    I love sharing these ideas! Thank you. I haven’t tried Dominos but I will, I’m sure there are some upstairs.
    I have tried jigsaws, they were great to start with but ended up just me doing them whilst OH watched or fell asleep.
     
  8. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    340
    I also found jenga bricks good, baby Lego (Duplo), swingball and a toddlers wooden train set. All things we had left from our children. Sadly my husband is not able to cope with most of these anymore. He still likes books with pictures though.

    I agree about the eating danger but my oh has long needed 24/7 supervision so I forgot about those days when he could safely entertain himself.
     
  9. lilypat

    lilypat Registered User

    Mar 1, 2019
    206
    Female
    Yorkshire
    Dominoes, playing cards, jigsaws, colouring books, snakes and ladders !!!!!
    You name it I have tried it with my OH. All discarded within days .
    The reason I believe is he never was someone who was interested in things like that before his dementia.
    He was just a worker . A man who went out everyday for over 50 years many years on nights then days 6am till 4pm ,plus any overtime that was there ,
    Weekends and holidays were just rest days We used to go for walks and cycle .
    He enjoys the TV things of the past old cops shows etc.
    The 1 thing he seems to enjoy is Music mostly the 60,s we have in on all day and in the car
    I am just happy to watch him sing along when he thinks no one is about .
     
  10. jugglingmum

    jugglingmum Registered User

    Jan 5, 2014
    5,026
    Female
    Chester
    The kids have always played board games with mum, but they've found she doesn't always understand the rules so play the proper rules round her. I guess it helps there are 2 of them playing (aged 18 and 14 now) Snakes and ladders became too complicated a while ago, she can still play connect 4 (and win playing properly). Haven't tried dominoes - I will dig a set out for next time she comes.
     
  11. Lynmax

    Lynmax Registered User

    Nov 1, 2016
    189
    Reading this thread I have just had a light bulb moment! We are a very competitive family and have always played board games at Christmas, lots of cheating but great fun. Now mum struggles to understand the rules but last year she just played on every team. She is still aware of her problems so we have to be very careful with how we offer support but I might try to get my 12 year old nephew to play some simple games with her. She still remembers how she used to look after him when he was poorly and his mum had to go to work so she might be fine with playing games with him. He is also brilliant with her, they have a real connection and he will chatter away to her about their favourite football team for hours - she still goes to all Manchester City home matches with my brother. I must dig out Connect Four, Jenga and Pairs for them to play, she might then be willing to play them with me.m
     
  12. northumbrian_k

    northumbrian_k Registered User

    Mar 2, 2017
    711
    Male
    Newcastle
    My wife was playing dominoes with 2 other residents and the activities coordinator at her home one day last week. It was a set with oversize dominoes making the dots easier to read. I can't say how it went as I left her to it, just pleased that she had sat down for once.

    Another idea that I tried when my Mother was in a care home about 12 years ago was a simple game of 'keepy uppy' with a balloon. This showed that her reflexes were still as sharp as ever and 4 of us had a good time just batting the balloon between us for a few minutes. The best memory I have of my Mam in the months leading up to her death.
     
  13. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    Would meccano be any good? more fiddly/spanner & screwdriver type activity. Wouldnt matter that he didn't make anything recognisable

    Tray of nuts and bots to put together? various sizes, add a few washers
     
  14. jugglingmum

    jugglingmum Registered User

    Jan 5, 2014
    5,026
    Female
    Chester
    Not thought of keepy uppy with a balloon, think mum would do that with the children.
     
  15. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    My husband has never been into jigsaws. However he does seem to like handling things, he's often going through one of the drawers just pulling things out and saying what they are. I do wonder now about getting a chunky type of jigsaw to see if he too likes handling it. I'm not sure where to get the sort of thing that would work.
     
  16. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    My husband likes to tidy the kitchen, I think he too sees it as being useful. Unfortunately he mixes dirty items with clean items and I end up having to clean everything again.
     
  17. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    Do let me know if successful, it is helpful to share ideas on here.
     
  18. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    I hadn't thought of those. I'll have a word with my daughter and see if she still has the grandchildrens bricks.
     
  19. jenniferjean

    jenniferjean Registered User

    Apr 2, 2016
    371
    Female
    Basingstoke, Hampshire
    I'm not sure. I did buy him one of those kits which builds shapes using magnets, which is still in the box. When I suggest he tries it he just says "not now".
     
  20. Bee.quilt

    Bee.quilt Registered User

    Dec 29, 2017
    77
    I’m grateful for theses replies. Will pick up on the washers and screws idea. My Oh like sorting things out so dominoes are good, but also I have two packs of Lexicon and have taken out difficult consonants. he is able to make words from a ‘deal ‘of seven cards, enjoys shuffling them and will put them in alphabetical order with help. He’ll also sort tangles out of my wool bag, find single colour buttons out of my collection, put the cotton reels in lines—he’s never done any of theses things before so it’s a pleasing surprise to see him happily occupied. Best wishes all.B x
     

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