• Expert Q&A: Rare dementias - Tues 3 March, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of rare dementias. It will be hosted by Nikki and Seb from Rare Dementia Support. If you have any questions about rare dementias, they will be here to answer them on Tuesday 3 March between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

diabetes

Natashalou

Registered User
Mar 22, 2007
426
london
does anyone know if there is a link? I have noticed my mother seems to be drinkin a lot of fizzy water, and when I asked her if she had a metallic taste in her mouth she said yes (although Im not sure she understood) also her eyesight has deteirated with amazing speed which I heard is another symptom, we were initially told it was cataracts but now that has been changed and she is waiting for new glasses but she has only had her exisiting pair a few months.
I tried to ask for a blood test for her and this is on her record for when the doc calls, unfortunatly I cant always arrange to be there as they are really gettin fed up with me at work now due to the time i have had off!
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
There is believed to be a link between diabetes and dementia but in that order, rather than in reverse ie someone who has diabetes is believed to be more likely to develop dementia but I don't think someone with dementia is more likely to develop diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes is probably more likely to occur as we age. Glucose intolerance is also more likely, and this can be a precursor to diabetes. It is very easy to test for with a simple finger prick, although the doctor may wish to do a fasting test which would involve a blood draw from the arm.

This link will take you to the Diabetes UK website and will show a list of the most common symptoms

http://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-diabetes/What_is_diabetes/Signs_and_symptoms/

I hope you manage to have your mother tested soon and then you should at least know.
 
Last edited:

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
I know with my mother that not controlling her diabetes 2, with medication contributed to her getting dementia AZ, because of lack of oxygen to the brain also when her food in take is not control she gets more confused, but when her diabetic is under control with medication and the right healthy food I can see a improvement in her confusion.

My mother eye sight is poor & has cataracts , Glaucoma , An optician can look in the eyes and see if a person has diabetic or if its getting worse .
 

Natashalou

Registered User
Mar 22, 2007
426
london
Ah

thanks for that she had an eye test as recently as two weeks ago so I guess the optician would have picked it up then. Blind, immobile and confused then :(
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Margarita said:
, An optician can look in the eyes and see if a person has diabetic or if its getting worse .
I don't think an optician would be the right person to diagnose diabetes. If diabetes is suspected then a blood test should be done. This can be done by the GP, a nurse or Lloyds pharmacies also do them.

Brenda
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
70,405
Kent
My husband had Type 2 diabetes well before he developed Alzheimers and the GP did suggest it was a possible cause, due to poor circulation to the brain.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
I don't think an optician would be the right person to diagnose diabetes.

My apologies:confused: , I did not say that
diagnose diabetes
,
should I have said that an optician could of pick up on it and could , would of said to go doctors, just that something alone those happen with me , when optician pick up on the pursue in my eyes that can lead to glaucoma , also my mother go to the optician that put a puff spay in her eye that picks up how her diabetic. if its geting worse , so optician can do check for those sighs or they would notice it .

so I am not saying go to an optician to get diagnose for diabetes :D :rolleyes: :D
 

sarah018

Registered User
Dec 12, 2006
11
Leeds
my gran had type 2 diabetes and dimentia. im not sure about the connection with the two but i know that for at least a year she didnt take any tablets for the diabetes and i dont think she took them for the dimentia. we found a stash of tablets when we were clearing out her house after she passed away.
i work for lloyds pharmacy, all you need to do is pop in to one of the stores which has a consultation area (not all do). we do recommend you fast for 8 hours but it can be done without. we cant acctually diagnose diabetes but we can give you an idea of if your sugar levels are high which is an indication that you might be diabetic. then we would send you to the doctors.
some of the others symptoms are passing water alot more frequently, dramatic weight gain, night cramps, pins and needles in fingers and feet, drinking lots or water, slow healing wounds, reccurant infections.
i hope this helps a bit
sarah x
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
sarah018 said:
some of the others symptoms are dramatic weight gain
sarah x
are you sure you don't mean dramatic weight loss Sarah, although I know that this is more common in type one than type two?

Brenda
 

Momx4

Registered User
Oct 19, 2006
25
Hello Natasha

My mother developed high blood pressure and diabetes in her 50s, both controlled by medication. She went on to develop glaucoma, which was also kept fairly stable by eye drops. Mum had a series of strokes which affected her right side and caused some memory loss when she was 76 and has had TIAs and other small strokes since then. The vascular dementia has been a series of drops and level periods with the attacks escalating over the last 4 years. Mum is now 86 and has been in an EMI unit since last July.

My mother's GP described the symptoms my mother has as a 'common cluster'. He said her illness followed a 'typical progression'. We felt that she was rather 'written off'. The last 4 years have been tricky but for 6 of the 10 years since her first stroke and because Mum was a fighter, she was able to maintain a good quality of life with the right support so things were not as bleak as they appeared initially.

I do agree that there seems to be a pattern of symptoms but Mum would have been really annoyed if we had followed the medical view and accepted the 'inevitable'. I hope you can find a positive way forward too.

With best wishes
Diana
 

sarah018

Registered User
Dec 12, 2006
11
Leeds
sorry i did mean loss yes. my mind is so scattered at the moment i didnt even realise! im not sure which it is most common with to be honest; my mum has type two and so did my gran, my mum didnt loose weight but my gran did. suppose it depends on the person i guess?
x
 

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