1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Vallyh

    Vallyh Registered User

    May 11, 2015
    1
    Dad is in moderate stages of Alzheimer's and although we,re managing care fine during the day, nights are HARD! My brother is main carer and is fantastic and I have stayed tonight to give him a break. It's now 4am and dad hasn't slept at all, wandering around the house. He's not sleeping during the day either and I'm getting really concerned about how long we can all keep this up. His specialist prescribed lorazepam l1/2 mg increased to 1mg which had no effect only made dad unsteady on his feet, and we have run out anyway. The specialist said my dad can't be left unattended but if he doesn't sleep I have no idea how we can manage that. He's far too able not to be at home with us but he hasn't had a nights sleep for seven days now and looks so tired it's heartbreaking. Am going to contact specialist later this am but not sure what he can do. ideas anyone?
     
  2. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Hello and welcome to Talking Point.
    I had this problem with my husband and sadly he did go into a NH when I reached breaking point. Once he was in the Home a locum consultant suggested queitaipine which is an anti psychotic drug, having a reputation of zonking out patients and other side effects. However I agreed to it in small doses as it did make such a difference to his quality of life. I often wished he had been prescribed this whilst at home as I believe I could have cared here for longer.

    It may be worth discussing anti psychotics to the consultant but if they are prescribed it is important that they are monitored carefully and not overdosed. I am sure there are more drugs that could be tried. Also we found that a regular dose of paracetamol helped to keep my husband generally more calm.

    I felt that if I had some relief support overnight for at least 3 nights per week then I would have managed longer. Our SS would not fund this and I certainly could not afford it either. Also I believe my husband would have still needed me around him so maybe I still would have not managed sleep.

    Not sure this helps but please insist on more discussions with the Consultant.

    In his later stages this night time activity stopped and he did eventually sleep a lot both day and night.
     
  3. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,593
    Female
    Scotland
    They need to try a different drug. I don't know about Lorazepam but my husband took to Zopiclone straight away. A few months later Trazodone was added. We are now on three tablets of Trazodone a day plus Zopiclone. He sleeps well at night and the additional meds are to stop him wandering during the day. Only partially successful for that so far.
     
  4. mrs mcgonnagal

    mrs mcgonnagal Registered User

    May 9, 2015
    153
    Hello, I am going through exactly the same at the moment, i will be calling the doctor again today but i don't know what she will do if anything. Please post again if you get any help or what your doctor does. Its exhausting. Best wishes.
     
  5. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,593
    Female
    Scotland
    My husband's doctor did not hesitate to prescribe sleeping tablets as she rightly said carers cannot cope without sleep. She did however make an early appointment back at the Memory clinic to monitor what was needed.
     
  6. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    My husband was not able to have sleeping tablets as he was 'high falls risk' and obviously the more sleepy he was the more likely he was to fall. Even without them he fell 3 or 4 times each night :eek:.
     
  7. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,495
    Female
    London
    I am a bit worried about all this talk of anti-psychotic drugs when someone with dementia can't sleep. If you suffered a bout of insomnia, would that be your first choice? I think not.

    Try non invasive measures first. Get him to do exercise or a long walk during the day to tire him out. Develop a bedtime routine. A nice hot bath. A glass of warm milk with honey. Find out why he is not sleeping. Is he afraid of the dark? Install a night light. Is he maybe in pain and feels it more during the night as nothing distracts then? Have the doctor give him a physical examination. Is the bed room cool enough? Does he think it's daytime? Would a dementia clock help? Might he accept a snack to get him back to bed? I know it's not easy and you have to play detective but I would only go down the medication route once nothing else helps. It might just be a phase. Alzheimer's patients go through a lot of phases.
     
  8. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,593
    Female
    Scotland
    Beate this is great advice for normal insomnia which the average person suffers but you will know only too well that there is no normal with dementia. John gets lots of exercise in the fresh air in all seasons, we are out every day, walking, swimming, shopping, lunching, going to Alzheimer's groups, appts medical, dental, barbers etc.

    Before the sleeping tablets he was up every two hours getting ready for work. When we come in the back door from outings he is already preparing to go out the front door. There is a compulsion with some people which can only be dealt with by medication - mores the pity!
     
  9. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,495
    Female
    London
    I know but I really think all other avenues need to be explored first. What if he is in pain that he can't articulate? What if it is something that can be dealt with without anti-psychotics? They are bad for people with dementia so should only be described as a last resort.
     

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