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Covid 19 and admission to care home

Amelie5a

Registered User
Nov 5, 2014
121
Scotland
I'm wondering if anyone has recent experience of looking for a care home for their PWD? Are you finding any particular difficulties?

The reason for asking is that I'm in this situation, trying to find a new care home for Dad, after his recent stay in a dementia assessment unit.

I've spoken to a number of care home managers and the 'story' is the same - no matter that someone may have had several negative tests, when they arrive in a new care home they have to remain in quarantine for 14 days. Recognising that this is extraordinarily difficult for anyone, let alone a new resident who has dementia, managers seem to have different approaches. One I spoke to will only admit one new resident every fortnight as she said the impact on staffing of trying to get someone to stay in a room for 14 days, was significant; another indicated that if someone couldn't adhere to quarantine rules, then he wouldn't admit them. (This was actually in to a specialist dementia unit)

And then I think of how the PWD may feel - moved in to a new environment, not knowing anyone or be known by anyone, it must be terrifying. You don't know where you are, you're not allowed to stray beyond the door, you can't go outside..... all the things that may help you settle, are forbidden.

It's dawning me on me that it requires an extraordinary level of care to manage that situation - and actually how few homes there are, that seem equipped to do so well.

So I'm curious to hear if anyone else has encountered a reluctance of care homes to admit new residents who have significant dementia?
 

Hoped

Registered User
May 17, 2020
11
Hi unfortunately we had the same issue with my Dad,over 12 care homes would not take Dad. He was clinically fit but after 5 weeks in hospital in the middle of the pandemic he deteriorated rapidly. Nurses just didn’t have the time to care . Eventually he was accepted into a NH and had to stay isolated in his room, they had 1 iPad for over a hundred residents so no calls . We were not allowed in or near the home . So sad and confusing for him. We got a call 5 days in at nightto say his breathing wasn’t good . I stayed the night with him.however when I saw him he was in such an unkept state,unwashed,sleeping in his dirty clothes.this is another issue when families are not permitted to see relatives they are unable to help them in so many levels. Dad didn’t stand a chance in that environment.
 

Amelie5a

Registered User
Nov 5, 2014
121
Scotland
I stayed the night with him.however when I saw him he was in such an unkept state,unwashed,sleeping in his dirty clothes.this is another issue when families are not permitted to see relatives they are unable to help them in so many levels. Dad didn’t stand a chance in that environment.
It's so hard, isn't it - not being able to try and help? Did the situation improve for your Dad?

My Dad went downhill during lockdown, having only moved in to the care home in January. From what I was told, he was resisting all personal care, sleeping in his clothes etc - much like your Dad. In fact, he had to be moved to a dementia assessment ward a few weeks ago.

Dad seems to be improving there, from what I've heard - I still can't visit! But I'm fearing that he will just go backwards again when moved in to a specialist dementia unit due to the effects of being kept in a room for 2 weeks, with very limited human contact. He's fit enough to want to move around.

One of the managers I spoke to is hoping that the guidance will be adjusted to allow for quarantine to be shortened if there are several negative tests in quick succession. But the stakes are SO high if that guidance were to change ; no-one, rightly, wants to introduce the virus into the home.

So, for the moment, I'm hoping he'll be able stay where he is - where he appears to have some quality of life and is responding to the more individual care. The thought of going back to square one, with another move and enforced quarantine, really worries me