cooking on gas or induction

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Mandida, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    My mum is in the early stages of dementia. She has difficulty with remembering to turn off the gas after using it, seeing how high it is turned up when she is cooking, remembering to put water in pans etc.
    The gas cooker is old and really needs to be replaced.
    I have been advised that induction cookers are safer.
    But I'm afraid that it may be too late for mum to learn how to use a new device.
    If I get an induction cooker, it may result in mum not being able to cook at all.
    On the other hand, things are getting quite risky and it is probably only a matter of time before she won't be able to cook anyway.
    What would you advise?
    Thanks
     
  2. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,740
    I think there comes a point where it is not safe for them to cook and I definitely wouldn't recommend a new method of cooking. My mum couldn't even manage a different kettle - that was about half way along early moderate stages.

    I know that some people have devices fitted to gas cookers to make them safer - someone will be along soon with some practical advice

    Welcome to TP - lots of support on here and it is a comfortable place to be and ask questions x
     
  3. Selinacroft

    Selinacroft Registered User

    Oct 10, 2015
    937
    Has your mum had a visit from the fire service yet? If not make an appointment and they will come and make sure she has adequate smoke alarms fitted in the right places - free of charge and fitted during visit.
     
  4. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,272
    Male
    North Manchester
    I agree that using any new appliance could lead to problems.

    Induction hobs could mean a complete change of all pans and saucepans, they are also a 'no no' if the user has a pace maker.
     
  5. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    Thanks for your reply. Yes, we had the visit from the fire service last week. The smoke alarms were fine.
    The young firemen suggested the induction cooker and getting rid of the coal fire.
    Sound advice in itself, but I don't think they had any experience with dementia.
    I have the feeling that whatever I do will be wrong.:(
     
  6. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    Thanks for your reply.

    One trouble is that as the old cooker has basically had it, the only alternative is a new one of some type. Even a new gas one won't be the same.

    Fortunately no pacemakers.

    And with regard to changes of pans, I've had to buy a few new ones as the old ones got burned anyway.
     
  7. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    Thanks for your welcome.

    I noticed the trouble with anything different when in a holiday cottage even a couple of years ago.
    :eek:
     
  8. jugglingmum

    jugglingmum Registered User

    Jan 5, 2014
    4,910
    Female
    Chester
    You mention she doesn't put water in pans, this can cause a problem whatever type of cooker you have.

    Maybe harder decisions need to be made. It is a fine balance between maintaining independence and maintaining safety, but safety has to win, whatever the cost to independence.

    I know my mum fuses her flat from time to time with forgetting to put water in the kettle and has burnt out a kettle. She has only done it once or twice on the fusing, and carers and a maintenance man are on site so it is all fixed at the next care visit. But the carers have told me they will let me know when they think she can no longer manage her kettle. I know she likes making cups of tea but at some stage safety has to come first.
     
  9. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,482
    Radcliffe on Trent
    Spot on jugglngmum. We tried various ways of enabling mum to keep using the kitchen, but none of them worked.

    We didn't remove the old gas cooker but we did put a lockable safety valve on so it could only be used when someone else was there.


    http://www.gasproducts.co.uk/acatalog/Full_Bore_Lockable_Gas_Ball_Valve_3_4_.html
     
  10. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,390
    Yorkshire
    Is your mum able to use a microwave? There are some lovely meals available to just warm up in the microwave - my dad's favourites were from M&S - I did his shopping, so was able to make sure he didn't buy any meals in metal containers. If she's already having problems cooking, that might move on swiftly - my dad was relieved not to have to worry and for quite some time could cope with heating a meal for himself

    the coal fire sounds lovely - though I'd be seriously considering the advice to replace it - I can't imagine how my dad would have coped with a real fire - I replaced his old gas fire with one that had a glass front as he took to throwing sweet wrappers at the old one, which was a mock real fire - does your mum have central heating? - maybe make sure the thermostat is set for the house to be warm so she doesn't need the coal fire?

    best wishes
     
  11. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    Thanks for your answer.
    No central heating, so it would be cold without the fire in the winter.
    Roll on summer.
     
  12. Mandida

    Mandida Registered User

    Jan 11, 2016
    11
    Thanks for your reply. You said, If she's already having problems cooking, that might move on swiftly.
    Things do seem to have been going quite swiftly since Christmas.
    But how swiftly is it likely to be?
    The cooking is quite random now. (Today it was the dog's dinner that got cooked!)
    Last week, on a particularly bad day, she said she would give up cooking and let me do it. But by the next day, she'd forgotten that and insisted on doing it herself.
    I suppose this is normal, but it seems so strange and bewildering when you first embark on this journey of trying to 'care'.
     
  13. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,390
    Yorkshire
    #13 Shedrech, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
    Yep, strange and bewildering pretty much sums it up :) along with random

    did the dog enjoy the warm meal - please don't tell me it got hers and she .....

    There's no timetable, and I was dealing with my dad who could cook but was a man of his age and tended to resort to beans on toast and cheese sandwiches - so actually he was happy to stop any real cooking and he felt happier that he could make himself a decent meal by just heating in the microwave - probably easier for him to stop dealing with food as it hadn't been part of his daily routine as it is for most women
    I now tend to think that if I see a change in something it's time to start preparing for a major shift whilst hoping that it's just a blip - just a silly example; dad didn't seem to be making a sandwich at lunch time, he took to going out to get a supermarket ready made, then had trouble with the packaging, so I made a lunch and left it in the fridge, then noticed he wasn't getting it out, so left in Tupperware on the kitchen surface, he forgot to eat, so a phone call reminder .... and so on
    Be as flexible as you can - and take it one day at a time - we all muddle through

    Just a thought about the fire - is there a fire guard, just in case of trips ? I have fond memories of an open fire in my childhood, but there was always a large fire guard surrounding it.
     

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