1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    #1 Kate P, Apr 9, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2008
    As you know dad has finally agreed to carers for a couple of hours per week. Last week went okayish but this week not so good.

    They rang dad and said they were going to have to leave and he would need to come back home which he did.

    However, from what he tells me there doesn't really seem to be good grounds for them leaving (to my mind anyway!).

    She sat with them and went through her photo albums and then got a duster out and started to clean (first attempt at any cleaning in months!!). She then put her coat on so they rang dad and said he'd have to come back.

    They haven't said that she was aggressive or in any way violent so why did they leave? Perhaps I'm expecting too much but I would expect professional carers would be able to deal with that much.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    Hi, sorry things not working out yet.

    Have you rung the manager or supervisor of the carers, to get a proper explanation? I think that would be my first move.

    Good luck
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Don't take this the wrong way, Kate, but is this information you got from the carers or from your father? Because you know he hasn't proved himself entirely reliable when it comes to reportage. However, I am wondering if it was the fact that she was trying to leave that was the kicker - they could not physically restrain her I would imagine. Is she still capable of opening the door? What about adding a rather more complicated lock? I'm thinking that they may be able to go along with passive restraint (i.e. not help her open a door) but once she's out that door there is nothing they can do. It's speculation though - can you not call them and find out?
     
  4. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Kate

    I agree with Jennifer here. If your mum was dtermined to go out, and you've said before she does this, there is nothing they could do to stop her.

    I'd ring the manager and hear their side of the story, they would have had to submit a report.

    If this is what happened, the suggestion of a new lock might work.

    Sorry it all went pear-shaped, and hope it's recoverable.

    Love,
     
  5. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    Thanks. I imagine she did try to leave - I would have thought it was in their scope to try and stop her but so be it.

    I do hope it is recoverable. I'm not convinced that the "game plan" is quite right for mum. They're telling dad he has to leave the house when the carers are there but I think that for a couple of weeks it would be better if he stayed in the house so that she sees he is okay with them being there?

    Then again, who knows? She may object to that as well.

    Well, fingers crossed that perseverence will pay off.
     
  6. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    Kate - they wouldn't be able to physically stop her but they should be able to at least try to employ distraction. Is there anything you've found that works in that situation? I was wondering if your mother would respond to a suggestion to look around the garden for example if she has her coat on. The other thing you should probably check: are these carers licensed (or insured or whatever) to accompany her off your property? Because if they're not that might be a stumbling block as well. When the care plan was written was it written in such a way as to exclude excursions? Because I know your mother likes to do that, so perhaps the care plan needs to be revisited.
     
  7. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Kate, when I had Crossroads for John, I was asked to stay in for the first couple of weeks until he got to know his carers. I agree with you, I don't think it's fair on your mum just to be left with people she doesn't know.

    Also, Crossroads ladies do take their clients out. John always went for a walk with his, or sometimes a drive for a coffee or icecream. I know that when people lived alone they took them into town for eye tests, hairdressers, etc.

    I'd definitely ask about this.
     
  8. Kate P

    Kate P Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    565
    Merseyside
    I'll definitely check that out because there's a place within walking distance where they could take her to feed the ducks which she usually enjoys.

    Should this care plan be in writing - should we have received something like that? So far it's just they tell dad verbally and he passes the info on to me. As far as I know there's been nothing put in writing that we've seen.
     
  9. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,419
    There has to be something somewhere in writing surely? Otherwise people wouldn't get paid. I wouldn't be surprised, though, that it hasn't been shared with the family, but that doesn't mean it shouldn't have been.
     
  10. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,722
    Kent
    Hello Kate.
    First of all I feel it`s wrong to ask your father to go out, for the first few visits anyway. Whether or not your mother remembers her carers, it`s as well to have your father on hand, `just in case`.
    Secondly, your father needs to think about what he wants from the carers. If he`s happy for them to take your mother out he needs to let the agency know this, so they can make sure insurance is in situ.
    I would have expected all eventualities to have been discussed before the first visit. I also thought carers were expected to pay a few visits to get to know the person being cared for and the domestic routine.
    It all sounds a bit hit and miss and doesn`t exactly fill me with confidence.
     
  11. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    We had a home visit from the manager, who went through what was needed, what John's interests were, whether he liked to walk, go shopping, etc. She matched the carer to John's interests, so we got a lady who was interested in art, know the local area, and liked walking. Absolutely perfect! She worked very hard to keep John talking for as long as possible.

    We didn't meet her in advance, but I stayed in for the first few times. Her first question was 'Where's the kettle?', so I always left out tea and coffee things and cakes.

    I don't think I got anything in writing, but certainly the manager made lots of notes. I think I may have had to sign an authorisation for her to take John out -- I know I had to for day centre.

    Sylvia, I didn't find it hit and miss, I never had the slightest complaint. She was always punctual, and would give me an extra half-hour when I had a U3A class. I'd come back early the other weeks, but she'd just stay and chat, she never took the time back.

    Kate, I think you need to talk to the manager yourself. You really don't know what has been arranged with your dad.

    Hope you can get it sorted.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.