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Resolving controversies on the path to Alzheimer’s therapeutics

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[QUOTE=TedHutchinson;518890][url=http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v17/n9/pdf/nm.2460.pdf]Resolving controversies on the path to Alzheimer’s therapeutics[/url]
The full text of this article is available at the link. It may be interesting to those who want to understand how the research has progressed and where it may be going.

I found the time line of Alzheimer's research interesting as well as chart showing the Hypothetical time course of AD with the stages at which interventions Clinical trials are applicable. Confirms my opinion we need to act before symptoms of any kind are apparent and the distinction between normal ageing and Alzheimer's is not as clear cut as some would like to portray.[/QUOTE]

I should perhaps suggest that sometimes it's happened I've posted links to full text free online papers as soon as they are published and later I find the link to the free source no longer works, therefore it's safer to download and save the PDF and then dispose of it if you think you'll never want to read it again.rather than assume it will always be available free at the original link.

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Updated 10-11-2011 at 06:12 PM by TedHutchinson

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    [url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22064069]Blood Folate is Associated with Asymptomatic or Partially Symptomatic Alzheimer's Disease in the Nun Study.[/url][quote]Abstract
    Asymptomatic and partially symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (APSYMAD) are a series of cognitive states wherein subjects have substantial Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (classification B or C by the Consortium to Establish a Registry for AD criteria), but have normal or only partially impaired cognitive function; all of these subjects are non-demented.
    These cognitive states may arise from the prevention or delay of clinical symptom expression by exposure to certain nutritional factors.
    This study examined blood levels of folate and antioxidants (i.e., carotenoids) in relation to APSYMAD, nested in the Nun study, a longitudinal study of aging and AD.
    Sixty elderly female subjects, who had AD on the basis of neuropathology exams, were included.
    Following adjustment for APOE4 status, education level, and age at blood draw, subjects with the highest blood folate levels had a higher likelihood of being in the APSYMAD group as compared to the demented (AD) group (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.00-1.18. p < 0.06).
    This association was not significantly influenced by additional adjustment for blood concentrations of carotenoids.
    Restriction of the population to subjects with near normal cognition on the cognitive state score (score = 1-3) indicated an elevated association with blood folate (odds ratio = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01-1.25, p < 0.04).
    Blood carotenoids were not associated with APSYMAD.
    Thus, folate status may influence the expression of clinical symptoms of AD disease and aid in the delay or prevention of dementia.[/quote]

    These nums would not have been identified as Pre Alzheimer's had they not been part of a trial. They were all normal or only partially impaired cognitive function; all of these subjects are non-demented. If ensuring you take an effective form of folate allows you to remain "normal" and not demented (albeit with indicators of Alzheimer') then this is the point at which cheap effective , side effect free interventions are most likely to delay the progress of the condition.