1. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    My husband is finding it very hard to step over the small step into our normal shower (he cannot manage a bath any more). Our bathroom is upstairs and whilst he can just about manage the stairs at present, I am anticipating that one day I may need to convert our dining room into a bedroom, thus keeping him on ground level.

    With this in mind, I am now investigating the possibility of making a wet room in an area we now use for coat hanging!! The area I am thinking of was probably a toilet years ago so maybe the drainage still exists.

    Has anyone experience or warnings about such 'wet rooms'?

    Beckyjan
     
  2. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    No experience, but it's something I have at the back of my mind too. I'd convert the dining area into a bedroom, and put a wet room into the (integral) garage.
    Don't want to unless I have to, but the possibility's there.

    I'll be interested in your replies.

    Love,
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,429
    My mother had a purpose built wet room in her flat. The one word of warning is to make sure the camber or slope of the floor is adequate: hers was designed and built by an artichitect but frankly, they have no idea how much water can spray about, particularly if the user is sitting (as is likely). They also failed to seal the back of the shower properly, but that's another story.

    I can tell you what sort of WC to NOT to get if you want as well :D

    Jennifer
     
  4. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Hi Jennifer - just curious about the WC. We already have washbasin and loo in a separate room downstairs so probably not relevant to us - but it may be useful to other viewers! Thanks for reply Jan
     
  5. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,429
    #5 jenniferpa, Jul 23, 2007
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2007
    Lets put it this way - what idiot thought a wc that is designed so that nowhere, when you sit on it, can "solid waste" fall anywhere but on the part of the porcelain that is NOT covered by water was a good idea? Combine that with a wall only attachment when the wall wasn't braced to hold it and you have a recipe for a disaster. I spent a lot of time muttering about male architects that had never had to clean a toilet, only to find that the person who selected it was female. The wall mounting, is, I have to say, a necessity when you're talking about a wet room since otherwise there's potentially water flooding around the base, but it's a good idea to brace it before it FALLS OFF THE WALL!!!
     
  6. currywurst

    currywurst Registered User

    Jan 29, 2006
    46
    Don't talk to me about wet rooms!

    Hi Beckyjan

    I don’t get much time to post on here but do read everyday, but I had to reply to this thread!

    I came to look after Mum after my father died almost two and a half years ago. One of the first things I did was to remove the existing shower cubicle (the cubicle had a step up of about a foot!) and turn the space into a wet room. At the time mum was extremely mobile she just couldn’t cope with stepping up. The first thing I would say is to make sure the flooring is anti – slip. The builder who installed mine assured me is was anti – slip but I soon discovered it wasn’t so that had to be replaced. Also the drain in mine is in the centre of the room but this isn’t good as it gets in the way because although the floor falls towards it there is still a slight lip on the cover which I have to avoid mum standing on or walking near, it would have been much better in the corner. Also space – make sure there is plenty of room to access all around the person being showered it’s amazing how much room you need to get around someone to wash and dry them properly and to put there pad on, and especially further down the line if the person is in a wheelchair. Plenty of hand rails at different levels are also useful. Also freestanding shower chairs with adjustable legs are ok if you can adjust it to a decent height but if not they are often too low to lower the person down safely. Also the seats that attach to the wall – most are too narrow, if you want one that attaches to the wall try to get one that is a full size seat so you can access all of the person’s body. I have a wheeled shower chair now as mum can hardly walk now but I have stuck some anti – slip pads on it as a soapy person gets quite slippery! Finally be prepared to get wet! You can get some waist height panels which are supposed to enclose the water but I can’t see how you could access the person you are showering properly but that’s personal preference, and be prepared to wash the floor after every shower as it takes ages for the floor to dry!

    I hope that helps beckyjan, good luck :)
     
  7. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi

    When I built the wet room within our new self build house, I was advised to "tank it" I think it is a special waterproofing system in the floor and maybe the walls. Sorry not be more specific, but maybe worth asking some questions.

    At the time it was meant to be my dog's shower room (St Bernards)

    The wet room is now redundant, because all of my Saints have now passed on and I could never entice Mum to use it, as much as I tried, she would use the toilet and the wash basin, but mention a shower, she freaked.

    I would also agree with all the point others have raised.

    Take care of yourself
    Alfjess
     
  8. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Thanks for your replies on this subject. A Occup.Therapist came this morning and we discussed the pros and cons of a wet room. She is arranging for an Architect to visit in the next few weeks, so I will take it from there. I am very undecided about the benefits (and for how long??) so will take it step by step.

    The OT has offered other small items which may help with the present - a small stool for the present shower - rails etc. - so the effort thus far has not been wasted.
    Take care all Beckyjan
     
  9. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #9 Margarita, Jul 24, 2007
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2007
    I was going to say , wait for an OP to come around , pleased to read that you got one in .

    In my other flat I move out of , they took out bath and put a walk in shower that took around 4 weeks , like someone said above they also put non slip flooring , as I had floor tiling .

    worth the wait
     
  10. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Hazel
    you have in mind just what I wanted too do.
    I went as far as seeking help from the British Legion, they will help ex service and their relatives. It seems they work with the City council.
    They said as the garage was only single brick it would have to be demolished and a shower room built in its place.
    My plans did not happen because as you know I lost Peg.
    I did get a conservatory built for her but she never used it.
    There is a firm that specialises in these conversions.
    Norman
     
  11. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Thanks Norman. I remember your conservatory, you posted a pic of the base. What a pity Peg never got to use it. Perhaps if we ever get any summer you'll be able to relax in it.

    I haven't investigated the shower yet -- don't fancy the upheaval, but it may come to that. I think it should be possible as the garage is integral, and I'd have it on the house side, probably with access from the utility room, so the plumbing shouldn't be difficult. (Says she who knows nothing about these things. John would have had the plans drawn up in a flash):(

    Love,
     
  12. snowtree

    snowtree Registered User

    Jun 14, 2007
    20
    ok i am going to answer your post from a building installing point of view. A wet room is quite a big undertaking. A wet room means just that...that water can go anywhere in the room and it doesnt matter - it will drain to a central point and efficiently be drained away. This can be on a timber floor (which is more difficult because timbers move and cause seals to leak) or on a concrete floor _ normally ground floor level. If a wet room is completed successfully it can be great! My dad - dementia sufferer - can miss the loo...you can literally hose down the wet room with bleach and keep it clean!! HOWEVER if it is not done professionally and with a LEAK FREE guarantee you can have water spilling through the ceiling or leaking under the floor and causing damp up the walls. The grout has to be 100% sound as do all the drain/tile joins. I would get in a company who offers a leak free guarantee and who can also give refrences from other wet rooms they have installed a COUPLE OF YEARS AGO. Time is the judge on this one and the leaks may not show themselves for a little while.
     
  13. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Thanks, Snowtree, that is very useful - an architect is due next month but I am beginning to list all the 'questions' with alarm bells in some cases.
    In our case we already have downstairs loo and washbasin. The wet room would be installed in a current 'cloakroom' off a downstairs porch (once an old scullery similar to farmhouses) - that once was a loo with obvious drainage.
    Apart from advice here on TP, no one has mentioned waterproofing the tiled walls etc (it is already tiled and the OT seemed to think that was ok !!??).

    The more I learn the more I wonder whether this is going to be a good idea.
    If David gets so bad and cannot use our existing shower upstairs, then maybe he will be into bed bath situation anyway. Sometimes I wish I knew a little of what was to come - it would be easier to make decisions.

    I so welcome the replies - I shall still continue with architect and take it from there.
    Best wishes Beckyjan
     
  14. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    I know what you mean , now that we have moved OT said when my mother can't do the stirs , they pull a wall down enlarging the toilet washbasin room we have downstairs to put shower in , but like Hazel says I to can't do with all the upheaval .


    About the
    So was mine already tiled , they had to pull some tiles of when they took bath out put they own tiles , I never had any problems with them.

    I was wondering what a Wet room was , but did not like to ask:rolleyes: as I never heard of it . thanks snowtree for explaining it
     
  15. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Margarita: the idea of me having a wet room was simply so that David could walk in without having a little step and also for me to be able to get at him when he needs more and more help. Also if and when he accepts a wheelchair I would be able to shower with him in that. Should he never manage stairs (like you say at present the exercise is better than none) - then I will make a room downstairs into a bedroom and he would be able to remain at ground level.

    The big thing is: will this ever happen and if so will he be so bedridden that we are only into bed baths???

    (We are heavily involved with a local hospice and I think we would be allowed the facility of their special bathrooms if needed - so the decision re wet room is getting harder).

    that amount of time tends to put me off!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Best wishes all Beckyjan
     
  16. angela.robinson

    angela.robinson Registered User

    Dec 27, 2004
    520
    I Had A Small Bedroom Turned Into A Wet Room , Fully Tiled , And Special Flooring Draining Into A Corner , Unfortunatly My Husbands Mobility Deteriorated Rapidly , And He Only Used It For A Few Months , ,it Was Very Costly , And If It Had Been Built On The Ground Floor It Would Have Been Worth Every Penny .. However , I Use It Myself , And Love It . So Definatly Not Going To Waste .
     
  17. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,139
    Kent
    Dear Jan,

    If David`s mobility has deteriorated to such an extent, the upheaval to build a wet room is so great, and you have the offer from a local Hospice to use their facilities, I`d accept with gratitude.

    In addition to the use of the facilities, there would always be someone `on hand` in case of difficulties. It would make it so much easier for you.

    Love xx
     
  18. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Hi Sylvia - its s... law - David masterminded the building of the Hospice and we together raised over £500,000 for it (trusts, foundations etc.) - 10 yrs of hard volunteer work.

    Now if I take him in for bathing I would have to do it out of hours as they do not take on dementia patients - just terminal illness (that was with David's own agreement when first set up!).

    So what I would do is go in out of hours, take one of the friend/nurses there and just get on with it. It is making the thought of hassle with building work, etc. seem unnecessary - but I still like the idea of 'doing it' at home!!
    Step by step I will still see the architect and see what he has to say.

    Pleased you are a bit better (what about a couple of nights respite for you - have you considered it?)

    Jan
     
  19. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,139
    Kent
    Not yet.............but thanks. Not only is Dhiren not yet ready, but neither am I.
     

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