1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Use of non approved drugs

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Seagull, May 30, 2006.

  1. Seagull

    Seagull Registered User

    May 29, 2006
    4
    S****horpe
    Hello everyone. I've only just realised the importance of the forum for support and information. My mum is 88 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2001. She's been OK in her own home with support until Feb this year when she was admitted to hospital under Section 2. since then there have been a series of "incidents". I find that she was prescribed amisulpheride (100mg) which I find is not an approved drug for dementia patients. I plan to make a formal complaint to the PCT. She has suffered 4 falls in 3 weeks, a case of Strep A (hospital acquired) and various other incidents. Has anyone any advice or guidance on the process or possible outcomes? She has now been relocated to a care home and is suddenly incontinent as well as suffering from infections in both legs. I'm at my wits end to know the best way forward. There is social service involvement as well as the NHS. Any advice or guidance would be appreciated.
     
  2. Kayla

    Kayla Registered User

    May 14, 2006
    621
    Kent
    Use of non-approved drugs

    Dear Seagull,
    Hospital is a stressful place for an elderly person with dementia and if they are not used to mixing with a lot of people, it is easy for them to pick up an infection. I don't know about the non-approved drugs, but they may be for another condition that your mother has.
    The problem of falls could be due to many medical conditions and they may be caused by the dementia. My mother started having falls, which was why she decided to go into a care home. Many elderly people suffer from incontinence, which could be controlled by drugs or exercises, or again it could be part of the dementia. Vascular dementia does seem to cause dramatic declines, which might get better until the next time.
    Hopefully, being cared for in a care home may help your mother's health and general well-being to improve. I think there is a lot to be learnt about the best ways to manage dementia as each patient reacts in a different way and they all have complex medical needs.
     
  3. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Hi Seagull and welcome to TP which I am sure you will find very useful and supportive.

    Regarding your complaints. Have you had any contact with PALS who should be able to help you with complaints against the hospital? If your mum was in a large hospital then they should have their own PALS department, otherwise a call to NHS Direct should be able to give you a number and explain the complaints procedure.

    Regarding the care home, is it a care home that you are as happy as it possible to be with? If not then you should be able to move her to a care home of your and her choice.

    How is your mum coping with all this?
     
  4. Kayla

    Kayla Registered User

    May 14, 2006
    621
    Kent
    Use of non-approved drugs

    Dear Seagull,
    Hospital is a stressful place for an elderly person with dementia and if they are not used to mixing with a lot of people, it is easy for them to pick up an infection. I don't know about the non-approved drugs, but they may be for another condition that your mother has.
    The problem of falls could be due to many medical conditions and they may be caused by the dementia. My mother started having falls, which was why she decided to go into a care home. Many elderly people suffer from incontinence, which could be controlled by drugs or exercises, or again it could be part of the dementia. Vascular dementia does seem to cause dramatic declines, which might get better until the next time.
    Hopefully, being cared for in a care home may help your mother's health and general well-being to improve. I think there is a lot to be learnt about the best ways to manage dementia as each patient reacts in a different way and they all have complex medical needs.
     
  5. Seagull

    Seagull Registered User

    May 29, 2006
    4
    S****horpe
    Thanks for the prompt response. I've been in touch with PALS and to be honest they are worse than useless in this situation. They seem to have an agenda for protecting the consultant who prescribed the drugs in the first place. Many of the incidents seem directly to relate to the cocktail of Amysulpiride and Temazipam which appear to induce a multitude of side effects.
    Mum's not coping well with not being in her own home. The care home is good, staff seem to be both caring and kind. The GP allocated seems to have little interest and the consultant even less interest. I get the impression that a compliant patient is the required outcome. Unfortunately I cannot accept compliance with what I believe is wrong prescribing.
    Maybe I am paranoid but I truly believe in patient advocay and Mum can no longer stand up for her rights.
     
  6. Seagull

    Seagull Registered User

    May 29, 2006
    4
    S****horpe
    Thanks Nadia - I haven't but I will
     
  7. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    I care for Lionel at home, and sometimes despair at how I have to monitor his drugs.

    Whenever a new and diffenent aspect of dementia rears its head, i.e. paranoia, or intense depression, YES there is a drug to combat this. Who monitors this, with all its pitfalls,yes ME. Never having any mediacl backgroung I do find this hard, but I accept it keeps him out of hopsital.
     

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