1. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Do most people find that their loved ones are given a definitive diagnosis of what type of dementia they have? My mother has had dementia for years and we have variously been told that it is Multi-Infarct and Lewy Bodies. I believe that Lewy Bodies is the most likely cause but this is only through what I have read about the symtoms. Also she has Parkinsons and I believe there can be a link with Lewy Bodies. I have also heard that in most cases it could only be definitely proved by a post-mortem - closing the stable door after the horse has bolted! Would there be any benefit in having a diagnosis? This is my first post so forgive me if I'm asking questions that have been answered many times over! Thanks in advance for any advice anyone can offer.

    :confused:
     
  2. Lila13

    Lila13 Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    1,342
    No diagnosis

    We (close family members and neighbours who've known my mother for years) believe my mother has dementia, but doctors say there's nothing wrong with her.

    She says "I am losing my memory" and "My mind ... I do mind". (I think she knows better than anyone else what is going on inside her head.)

    She attributes her present condition to an incident involving flea poison about 5 years ago.
     
  3. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Hi Noelphobic
    welcome to Talking Point
    Question
    I have also heard that in most cases it could only be definitely proved by a post-mortem - closing the stable door after the horse has bolted!
    This is true ,blood tests can show certain things ,scans can show brain shrinkage,but specific diagnosis can only be made after death.
    If you have a look at the fact sheet on this site it gives much information
    http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/How_is_dementia_diagnosed/Diagnosis_process/info_diagnosis.htm.
    Hope this is helpful.
    Post when you need
    Regards
    Norman
     
  4. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Hi Norman

    Thanks for your reply.I did find the factsheet you mentioned after I posted. As my mum has had dementia for some time I don't really think there is much point in us pursuing a diagnosis at this stage. I'm not sure why I asked the question really! I suppose that sometimes reading other people's stories it somehow seems that they have been given more definitive diagnoses from the start.

    She has probably had dementia for around 8 or 9 years now, so I suppose I should count myself lucky that she's still around and she still knows the people closest to her. That is really myself, my sister and my son as very few other people visit her. But maybe that story is for another visit! :rolleyes:
     
  5. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hello Noel, welcome to TP

    It is frustrating sometimes when diagnosis is not definate, i.e. Lewy Body/Multi-Infarct, so I tend to use the umberella of "dementia". Even when a diagnosis is made, like my Lionel and Alzheimers, after a few years someone in the proffession starts questioning"could it now be Vascular".

    As long as treatment is being obtained, and you can put in place the services you need, my attiitude is 2does it matter". We can only do our best for our loved ones, and fight for the best treatment, whatever the diagnosis.

    Take care now, Connie
     
  6. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Hi Connie and thanks for your reply

    As far as treatment being obtained, she isn't on any kind of medication for the dementia, although she's on lots of medication for other problems!

    She was in an EMI home for a year until she broke her hip. She is now in a nursing home and confined to a wheelchair. The nursing home was supposed to be arranging for physio but she has been there for a month now and they are only just trying to arrange it because I've chased it up! I think it is easier for them when all their residents are in wheelchairs.
     
  7. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    I do have to agree with the comment about "easier being left in wheelchairs".

    Not all homes I know, and some here on TP have accessed really good homes, where all needs are met. Unfortunately, shortage of staff etc. does result in patients being left sitting a lot longer than necessary. We just have to carry on complaining on their behalf. Take care now, Connie
     
  8. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    My sister and I spent a lot of time looking at nursing homes before my mum went to this one. When she went to the first (EMI) home my father had just died. We had a choice of 2 homes and a week to find a place. We now have a complaint with CSCI because of the circumstances surrounding the fall that resulted in the broken hip. It's a long story and I will no doubt bore you with it some other time!!!

    We believe the nursing home she is now in to be 'as good as they get' Ironically it was the first home that we looked at this time round and we really liked it. Then we found out that they had a long waiting list so we looked at other homes none of which we liked. However, despite having a waiting list, they had a space in a shared room - because nobody likes shared rooms. We accepted this but now my mum has fallen out with her room mate! My mum is 85 and her roomie is 90 and during the day they are not aware of each others existence! There is a space in another shared room but the other resident is presently in hospital. We have decided to allow my mum to move into this new room although we are worried about whether it will unsettle her.
     
  9. Lila13

    Lila13 Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    1,342
    Hope she'll be OK with the new room-mate.

    It is difficult to imagine being forced to share with a stranger, as an adult. (Had enough of that 40-whatever years ago.)
     
  10. Kathleen

    Kathleen Registered User

    Mar 12, 2005
    639
    West Sussex
    My Mum is in a shared room too and had a fall out with her room-mate a few months ago, we never did find out what the problem was,the staff at the home moved the other lady for two weeks,when she returned to Mum's room all was well again.
    We found a shared room was good for Mum as she was scared on her own, and another person in the room meant she settled back to sleep much more easily.
    Kathleen
     
  11. Lila13

    Lila13 Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    1,342
    You never know, do you, how two people will react if forced to share?

    At the moment my mother isn't inclined even to share her 4-bedroom house, so how she'd react to room-sharing I dread to think.

    She doesn't like being alone all day, but wants people to disappear quite quickly when dismissed, and gets stroppy if they won't take a hint.

    And if someone else is in a similar state or worse ...
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.