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Toliet Problems In Care Home

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by sixy74, Aug 21, 2018.

  1. sixy74

    sixy74 Registered User

    Jul 4, 2018
    101
    Hi Everyone
    Another day another question !
    Dads currently in a care home as the title suggests and even though his dementia has progressed his brain still lets him know when he needs to use the toilet, he can't tell you which end so it's a case of having to sit him on the toilet each time.
    Now Dads mobility has really declined over the past few months meaning the care home has him wearing incontinence pads for obvious reasons. The problem we have at the moment is that once Dad has informed us that he needs to use the toilet at times it can be a while before the carers are able to take him meaning sometimes he has an accident as he can't hold it for long due to suffering with an enlarged prostate.
    Today upon our visit I found Dad confined to his room due to the fact that he has a sore bottom ( no other way of putting it) lying on his side in the bed to prevent damage to the skin, in my opinion this has probably been caused by Dad having to lie in a wet incontinence pad during the night. The staff check on him every couple of hours but if he needs the toilet just after their check then he could be lying wet for another couple of hours, as he is unable to use the help button for obvious reasons. This never happened at home as we took him to the toilet immediatley.
    How can I approach this problem, as the care home do not have enough staff to see to every resident straight away, I don't suppose any care home would.
    They have said they will increase their checks
     
  2. Angela57

    Angela57 Registered User

    Jan 22, 2016
    195
    I think that I would ask that he's checked hourly both day and night. Does he have the necessary barrier creams to be applied? I would check his room to ensure they are there each time you visit in the future too. For some reason, barrier creams tend to go missing. Also, incontinence pads can go missing too, so I'd check that he has an adequate supply of them too when visiting, and raise concerns with the home if they are not readily available for him.
     
  3. chris53

    chris53 Registered User

    Nov 9, 2009
    2,930
    London
    good afternoon sixy,it seems to be a very common problem with not enough staff to do more regular checks,but it does seem very uncaring and somewhat neglectful for dad to be confined to his room,lying on his side to prevent pressure on his sore bottom,because of the possibility of being left in soiled or soaked pads for too long,which may cause even more health problems,may I ask has the doctor checked this out? also the doctor may be able to advise on fluid intake,which may prevent some of these accidents,please request that dad has a visit by the doctor(hopefully at the same time you are there) urgently. Hope so much you get this sorted out quickly.
     
  4. sixy74

    sixy74 Registered User

    Jul 4, 2018
    101
     
  5. sixy74

    sixy74 Registered User

    Jul 4, 2018
    101
    #5 sixy74, Aug 21, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2018
    Thanks guys for both of your reply’s, I did see a barrier cream today and there is a good supply of pads also.
    I do agree that keeping him in his room isn’t the solution to the problem.
    In your opinion would you say that this problem is now a medical need and will help with the homes application for one to one funding as this would help with this problem as Dad could go to the toilet when he needs to.
     
  6. love.dad.but..

    love.dad.but.. Registered User

    Jan 16, 2014
    4,380
    Kent
    Dad had a similar stage before incontinence but no very unlikely I would say...ineffective regime has caused the problem rather than medical need....from my experience with my dad the answer lies in talking with the manager and regardless of any staff shortage issues or availability of staff...reinforce with him/her that you expect your dad during this phase to be checked and changed regularly particularly at night..cleaned in that area effectively regularly...good amount of barrier cream to be applied every change...and regular prompting and/or to be taken to the toilet. And keep monitoring and reminding staff. Make sure that they update his care plan to include all of this and ask the manager that all staff are made aware of this.This is what I did for dad who suffered a sore groin for similar reasons now and again plus I encouraged the staff to give him a bath rather than shower once a week so his groin could soak. Keeping him in his room on his bed is in my view not acceptable as their solution.
     
  7. sixy74

    sixy74 Registered User

    Jul 4, 2018
    101
    Great bit of advice thank you very much
     
  8. love.dad.but..

    love.dad.but.. Registered User

    Jan 16, 2014
    4,380
    Kent
    #8 love.dad.but.., Aug 21, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2018
    Plus if the GP hasn't seen him I would ask him to be seen as he may need something other than a barrier cream prescribed...I can't now remember what it was but for dad's groin area which became very red sore another type of cream possibly steroid or anti fungal cream was also prescribed by the GP which was applied as needed.
     
  9. Angela57

    Angela57 Registered User

    Jan 22, 2016
    195
    Metanium is often used instead of barrier creams, and works quite quickly. It's still used for the elderly, and in my day, was used for severe nappy rash for babies.
     
  10. sixy74

    sixy74 Registered User

    Jul 4, 2018
    101
    Well guys visited Dad this afternoon and to my surprise the District Nurse has been to the home and prescribed a cream for Dad’s problem and the care home has ordered a new bed to try and prevent the problem, so fingers crossed we are moving in the right direction
     
  11. love.dad.but..

    love.dad.but.. Registered User

    Jan 16, 2014
    4,380
    Kent
    Good...proactive is a good sign and all you can ask of them
     

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