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The Lighter Side Of Alzheimers

CardiffGirlInEssex

Registered User
Oct 6, 2018
153
This town ain't big enough for the both of us...Or am I remembering the wrong track?? Appropriate to the circumstances though, i think!
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
1,660
Essex
I seem to remember that dad said that this music sounds b***** awful!

I was to busy sniggering to say anything.

MaNaAk
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
83
North East England UK
Went to visit Mum in CH last weekend. Found her slumped over sleeping in a chair in the lounge. I wanted to see how she was doing when she didnt know I was there. Suddlenly she woke up, looked around confusedly, then she saw me and exclaimed loudly "Daughter!"
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
83
North East England UK
The other nice thing is she enjoying her food nnow and eating proper meals, which was not the case when she was at home. As the dementia progressed she forgot about refusing to eat, she has gained weight and no longer emaciated.
Another thing, winks at men. But keeps poker face while winking.
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
1,660
Essex
Went to visit Mum in CH last weekend. Found her slumped over sleeping in a chair in the lounge. I wanted to see how she was doing when she didnt know I was there. Suddlenly she woke up, looked around confusedly, then she saw me and exclaimed loudly "Daughter!"
Lovely!

MaNaAk
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
1,660
Essex
The other nice thing is she enjoying her food nnow and eating proper meals, which was not the case when she was at home. As the dementia progressed she forgot about refusing to eat, she has gained weight and no longer emaciated.
Another thing, winks at men. But keeps poker face while winking.
So that's probably how dad came to achieve two female admirers! He was also the same as your mum regarding his eating but he was also diabetic.

MaNaAk
 

Lyd

Registered User
May 27, 2019
62
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,074
68
Dundee
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
That’s lovely. :)
 

LynneMcV

Volunteer Moderator
May 9, 2012
3,851
south-east London
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
How lovely - it made me smile just picturing it :)
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
436
Yesterday I was making my husband a cup of coffee and he said to me “you’re very reliable” it did make me smile
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
83
North East England UK
Mum worked in a textile mill for her first job before joining the Womens Royal Air Force, at the time joining the military and getting a on the job training was the only way out of poverty for young working class youth. Later she worked as an assistant to a seamstress in a small habadashery shop. She loved textiles as well as being very knowlegeable about them, and made clothes, as well as knitting and embroidery, but as the dementia progressed she would not wear anything new, her clothes were worn, frayed, had paint on them (one of her hobbies was painting, both art work and the walls). The clothes were actually dirty most of the time. I bought her new clothes but she preferred to wear the same old things over and over.
When she was admitted to the care home I gradually managed to get all her clothes out of the house and taken to the care home. Some of the clothes were very nice and had hardly been worn at all, others were almost rags. The other strange thing she had used scissors to cut some of them up. Once she was in the care home she began to run out of clothes. I also bought a lot of clothes from a supermarket which delivers. I I go on their website, choose what I know she world like and get it delivered to her in the care home.
When I go to see her she is now wearing nice clothes. She doesnt' know where they have come from. In fact she did complain to me that the pretty dress she was wearing (one that has been in her wardrobe at home wrapped in plastic, probably kept for "best") should have been ironed)!
Is it selfish of me to feel pleased that Mum is dressed in nice clothes that she doesnt understand where they have come from? Of course the ideal scenario would be she chooses her own clothes, and dresses appropriately. But so much better than wearing smelly dirty frayed clothes...
The lighter side is that she likes the new clothes, and enjoys wearing them.