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The Lighter Side Of Alzheimers

CardiffGirlInEssex

Registered User
Oct 6, 2018
217
This town ain't big enough for the both of us...Or am I remembering the wrong track?? Appropriate to the circumstances though, i think!
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,991
Essex
I seem to remember that dad said that this music sounds b***** awful!

I was to busy sniggering to say anything.

MaNaAk
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
134
North East England UK
Went to visit Mum in CH last weekend. Found her slumped over sleeping in a chair in the lounge. I wanted to see how she was doing when she didnt know I was there. Suddlenly she woke up, looked around confusedly, then she saw me and exclaimed loudly "Daughter!"
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
134
North East England UK
The other nice thing is she enjoying her food nnow and eating proper meals, which was not the case when she was at home. As the dementia progressed she forgot about refusing to eat, she has gained weight and no longer emaciated.
Another thing, winks at men. But keeps poker face while winking.
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,991
Essex
Went to visit Mum in CH last weekend. Found her slumped over sleeping in a chair in the lounge. I wanted to see how she was doing when she didnt know I was there. Suddlenly she woke up, looked around confusedly, then she saw me and exclaimed loudly "Daughter!"
Lovely!

MaNaAk
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,991
Essex
The other nice thing is she enjoying her food nnow and eating proper meals, which was not the case when she was at home. As the dementia progressed she forgot about refusing to eat, she has gained weight and no longer emaciated.
Another thing, winks at men. But keeps poker face while winking.
So that's probably how dad came to achieve two female admirers! He was also the same as your mum regarding his eating but he was also diabetic.

MaNaAk
 

Lyd

Registered User
May 27, 2019
84
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
63,237
69
Dundee
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
That’s lovely. :)
 

LynneMcV

Volunteer Moderator
May 9, 2012
3,989
south-east London
Took MIL out. On return to her house i watched from the car as she unlocked to door. Suddenly she raised her hands in the air and swivelled quickly round to face me. Thinking something terrible had happened I prepared for action... then i realised the sun had come out.
She was dancing in the sudden ray of sunshine!
How lovely - it made me smile just picturing it :)
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
775
Yesterday I was making my husband a cup of coffee and he said to me “you’re very reliable” it did make me smile
 

Mydarlingdaughter

Registered User
Oct 25, 2019
134
North East England UK
Mum worked in a textile mill for her first job before joining the Womens Royal Air Force, at the time joining the military and getting a on the job training was the only way out of poverty for young working class youth. Later she worked as an assistant to a seamstress in a small habadashery shop. She loved textiles as well as being very knowlegeable about them, and made clothes, as well as knitting and embroidery, but as the dementia progressed she would not wear anything new, her clothes were worn, frayed, had paint on them (one of her hobbies was painting, both art work and the walls). The clothes were actually dirty most of the time. I bought her new clothes but she preferred to wear the same old things over and over.
When she was admitted to the care home I gradually managed to get all her clothes out of the house and taken to the care home. Some of the clothes were very nice and had hardly been worn at all, others were almost rags. The other strange thing she had used scissors to cut some of them up. Once she was in the care home she began to run out of clothes. I also bought a lot of clothes from a supermarket which delivers. I I go on their website, choose what I know she world like and get it delivered to her in the care home.
When I go to see her she is now wearing nice clothes. She doesnt' know where they have come from. In fact she did complain to me that the pretty dress she was wearing (one that has been in her wardrobe at home wrapped in plastic, probably kept for "best") should have been ironed)!
Is it selfish of me to feel pleased that Mum is dressed in nice clothes that she doesnt understand where they have come from? Of course the ideal scenario would be she chooses her own clothes, and dresses appropriately. But so much better than wearing smelly dirty frayed clothes...
The lighter side is that she likes the new clothes, and enjoys wearing them.
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,991
Essex
I was listening to my 'The Best Of 1975' CD again today and when it got to the Sparks songs I was again reminded of dad walking out of the kitchen saying that this is b***** awful. I just laughed to myself and thought this is one way to stop him following me around. Anyway if you want any Halloween ideas just watch retro footage of this duo on the computer!

MaNaAk
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,991
Essex
Thankyou @Bunpoots!

As dad says 'b*****' awful with the hideous singing and the creepy twin with the moustache what more could you want for halloween. There are several other creepy singers from the seventies and early eighties and I remember our mum coming into the lounge just as we were watching Top Of The Pops and as S. Solo was singing my mum said 'gosh he looks like the villain from Halloween'!

MaNaAk
 

Triffid

Registered User
Oct 4, 2020
14
I was gently (And seriously) trying to introduce dad to the idea of having a shower and asked him if the worst part was the effort of having to get undressed and then dressed again.
“No” he says, “it’s the getting wet“.
We’re lucky at the moment that although his memory is really bad, his language and sense of humour are still there.
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,583
@Triffid The comment about not liking getting wet can be quite common in those with dementia so may not be due to your Dad's 'sense of humour'. Mum was fine with a bath but really didn't like the sensation of water on her face when I washed her hair so I swapped to using dry shampoo for a while.
 

Triffid

Registered User
Oct 4, 2020
14
@Triffid The comment about not liking getting wet can be quite common in those with dementia so may not be due to your Dad's 'sense of humour'. Mum was fine with a bath but really didn't like the sensation of water on her face when I washed her hair so I swapped to using dry shampoo for a while.
Yes, there is an element of that with dad although in this case he was winding me up for being too serious. He always preferred a long soak in the bath but can’t get in and out of it these days
 

Triffid

Registered User
Oct 4, 2020
14
Yes, there is an element of that with dad although in this case he was winding me up for being too serious. He always preferred a long soak in the bath but can’t get in and out of it these days
But he’s also never liked getting his hair wet even when he does have a shower. I wonder why there is a dislike of water/washing with dementia?
 

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