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Supplying own equipment in care home

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Diannie, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Diannie

    Diannie Registered User

    Jun 2, 2015
    168
    what are the actual rules for taking your own equipment into a care home. My husband now panics when it comes to being helped onto the toilet. He won’t bend his legs to sit down. He seems to have a fear of going backwards. There is a portable seat with a frame round (I think they are called a Mowbray) which he uses easily. But they say he cannot use it any more until he has been assessed. He always needs assistance so is always supervised. The care home says an assessment could take weeks because he is not classed as a priority. I asked if I could bring a fixed raised toilet seat in for him to use until the assessment. The head of care said wait. The care leader said she couldn’t see a problem. So I took one in today. But I wonder if he will be allowed to use it while waiting. Has anyone taken their own equipment in and been able to use it?
     
  2. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,028
    Male
    North Manchester
    Obviously the home can insist that any equipment taken into the home is both appropriate and safe for their carers to use.
    They can either make a decision themselves or call on the LA to make one, in your case it looks as if they have decided they do not have the expertise and have asked for an LA assessment - hence the delay.
    All you can do is chase the home/LA for an assessment.
    In my wife's case the problem of sitting down on the toilet was solved by using two carers, one each side and holding a hand, saying 'let's sit down', the inability to 'sit' was physiological not physical.
     
  3. Diannie

    Diannie Registered User

    Jun 2, 2015
    168
    Yes. This is exactly what is happening with my husband. I thought in the meantime until the assessment it would make things easier. They probably won’t appreciate that. So I’m not sure whether to remove it
     

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